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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 52 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 16 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 16 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 6 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Euphrates or search for Euphrates in all documents.

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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The description of the countrey of Russia, with the bredth, length, and names of the Shires. (search)
sea : as the dukedome of Volodemer, of Mosco, Rezan, &c. Some have thought that the name of Sarmatia was first taken from one Sarmates, whom Moses & Josephus cal Asarmathes sonne to Joktan, & nephew to Heber, of the posteritie of Sem. But this seemeth to be nothing but a conjecture taken out of the likenes of the name Asarmathes. For the dwelling of all Joktans posteritie is described by Moses to have bene betwixt Mescha or Masius (an hil of the Ammonites) & Sephace, nere to the river Euphrates : which maketh it very unlikely that Asarmathes should plant any colonies so far off in ye North & northwest countries. It is bounded northward by the Lappes & the North Ocean. On the Southside by the Tartars called Crimmes. Eastward they have the Nagaian Tartar, that possesseth all the countrey on the East side of Volga towards the Caspian sea. On the West and Southwest border lieth Lituania , Livonia and Polonia . The whole Countrey being nowe reduced under the government of one, co
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage and travell of M. Caesar Fredericke, Marchant of Venice, into the East India, and beyond the Indies. Wherein are conteined the customes and rites of those countries, the merchandises and commodities, aswell of golde and silver, as spices, drugges, pearles, and other jewels: translated out of Italian by M. Thomas Hickocke. (search)
ctuals, and nere unto the walles of the city runneth the river of Euphrates . In this city the marchants divide themselves into companies, acce a boat to carry them and their goods to Babylon downe the river Euphrates , with charge of a master and mariners to conduct the boat in the ey stand greatly in feare of the shot. And as you passe the river Euphrates from Bir to Feluchia, there are certein places which you must pas of the desert, who hath certain cities and villages on the river Euphrates . Feluchia and Babylon. FELUCHIA is a villin abundance two dayes journey from Babylon. Nere unto the river Euphrates , there is a city called Heit, nere unto which city there is a gre fort, which is set on that point of the land where the rivers of Euphrates and Tygris meet together, and the castle is called Corna : at thyes we passe by villages inhabited until we have passed the river Euphrates . And then within two dayes of Alepo we have villages inhabited. I
ir. BIR is a small city very scarse of all maner of victuals, and nere unto the walles of the city runneth the river of Euphrates . In this city the marchants divide themselves into companies, according to their merchandise that they have, and there either they buy or make a boat to carry them and their goods to Babylon downe the river Euphrates , with charge of a master and mariners to conduct the boat in the voyage: these boats are in a maner flat bottomed, yet they be very strong: and for allebuzes are very good weapons against them, for that they stand greatly in feare of the shot. And as you passe the river Euphrates from Bir to Feluchia, there are certein places which you must passe by, where you pay custome certaine medines upon a b are certein places which you must passe by, where you pay custome certaine medines upon a bale, which custome is belonging to the sonne of Aborise king of the Arabians and of the desert, who hath certain cities and villages on the river Euphrates .
Babylon and Basora. FROM Babylon I departed for Basora, shipping my selfe in one of the barks that use to go in the river Tigris from Babylon to Basora, and from Basora to Babylon: which barks are made after the maner of Fusts or Galliots with a Speron and a covered poope: they have no pumpe in them because of the great abundance of pitch which they have to pitch them with all: which pitch they have in abundance two dayes journey from Babylon. Nere unto the river Euphrates , there is a city called Heit, nere unto which city there is a great plaine full of pitch, very marvellous to beholde, and a thing almost incredible, that out of a hole in the earth, which continually throweth out pitch into the aire with continuall smoake, this pitch is throwen with such force, that being hot it falleth like as it were sprinckled over all the plaine, in such abundance that the plaine is alwayes full of pitch: the Mores and the Arabians of that place say, that that hole is
n of a great countrey, and cannot be overcome of the Turke, because that the sea hath divided their countrey into an Iland by channels with the ebbing and flowing of the sea, and for that cause the Turke cannot bring an army against them, neither by sea nor by land, and another reason is, the inhabitants of that Iland are very strong and warlike men. A dayes journey before you come to Basora, you shall have a little castle or fort, which is set on that point of the land where the rivers of Euphrates and Tygris meet together, and the castle is called Corna : at this point, the two rivers make a monstrous great river, that runneth into the sea, which is called the gulfe of Persia, which is towards the South: Basora is distant from the sea fifteene miles, and it is a city of great trade of spices and drugges which come from Ormus. Also there is great store of corne, Rice, and Dates, which the countrey doth yeeld. I shipped my selfe in Basora to go for Ormus, and so we sailed thorow the
dayes over the wildernes, in which 36. dayes they neither see house, trees, nor people that inhabite it, but onely a plaine, and no signe of any way in the world. The Pilots go before, and the Carovan followeth after. And when they sit downe all the Carovan unladeth and sitteth downe, for they know the stations where the wells are. I say, in 36. dayes we passe over the wildernesse. For when wee depart from Babylon two dayes we passe by villages inhabited until we have passed the river Euphrates . And then within two dayes of Alepo we have villages inhabited. In this Carovan there goeth alway a Captaine that doth Justice unto all men: and every night they keepe watch about the Carovan, and comming to Alepo we went to Tripoli , whereas Master Florin, and Master Andrea Polo, and I, with a Frier, went and hired a barke to goe with us to Jerusalem. Departing from Tripolie, we arrived at Jaffa : from which place in a day and halfe we went to Jerusalem, and we gave order to our barke to
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. Ralph Fitch marchant of London by the way of Tripolis in Syria , to Ormus, and so to Goa in the East India, to Cambaia, and all the kingdome of Zelabdim Echebar the great Mogor, to the mighty river Ganges, and downe to Bengala, to Bacola, and Chonderi, to Pegu , to Imahay in the kingdome of Siam , and backe to Pegu , and from thence to Malacca, Zeilan, Cochin, and all the coast of the East India: begunne in the yeere of our Lord 1583, and ended 1591, wherein the strange rites, maners, and customes of those people, and the exceeding rich trade and commodities of those countries are faithfully set downe and diligently described, by the aforesaid M. Ralph Fitch. (search)
entifull of victuals: and neere to the wall of the towne runneth the river of Euphrates . Here we bought a boate and agreed with a master and bargemen, for to go to B which a gunne is very good, for they doe feare it very much. In the river of Euphrates from Birra to Felugia there be certaine places where you pay custome, so manyseene to goe into it. It doth stand upon a great plaine betwixt the rivers of Euphrates and Tygris. By the river Euphrates two dayes journey from Babylon at a pEuphrates two dayes journey from Babylon at a place called Ait, in a fielde neere unto it, is a strange thing to see: a mouth that doth continually throwe foorth against the ayre boyling pitch with a filthy smoke:em the Turke cannot subdue, for that they holde certaine Ilandes in the river Euphrates which the Turke cannot winne of them. They be theeves all and have no setled he did once dwell there. From thence I went to Bir, & so passed the river of Euphrates . From Bir I went to Aleppo, where I stayed certaine moneths for company; an
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. John Eldred to Trypolis in Syria by sea, and from thence by land and river to Babylon and Balsara. 1583. (search)
nd his company, and came to Birrah in three dayes, being a small towne situated upon the river Euphrates , where it beginneth first to take his name, being here gathered into one chanell, whereas befoad as he was asleepe: and therefore travellers keepe good watch as they passe downe the river. Euphrates at Birrah is about the breadth of the Thames at Lambeth , and in some places narrower, in som of yron. From thence we departed in flat bottomed barks more strong & greater then those of Euphrates , and were eight and twenty dayes also in passing downe this river to Balsara, but we might havnother Zecchiah. Before we come to Balsara by one dayes journey, the two rivers of Tigris and Euphrates meet, and there standeth a castle called Gurna, kept by the Turks, where all marchants pay a syes journey from Babylon toward Aleppo, neere unto a towne called Heit, as we crosse the river Euphrates by boates, about 3. miles from the town there is a valley wherein are many springs throwing ou