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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. 2 0 Browse Search
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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7., An eighteenth century enterprise. (search)
and thirtyseven feet long, elevated thirty feet above its current. While the aqueducts were costly, yet the long stretches of meadow land the canal had to cross were extremely treacherous and swallowed up a vast amount of filling ere the course of the canal was secure. In some intervals they had to be filled upwards of one hundred feet in width to a depth of ten feet to form the canal bed before the embankments were made. This difficulty overcome and Maple Meadow Brook (the source of Ipswich River) crossed, a loop, called the Ox-bow, had to be made around a hill. Much of the work was through a sandy soil, but in various places its course could not avoid ledges of solid rock. These taxed the effort and patience of the laborers, who were mostly native born, as emigration from Ireland, Italy and Hungary was then but slight. The shore of Medford Pond, or, as it is now termed, Mystic Lake, was originally intended for the southern terminus, but the canal was built six miles further
nal stations were the brick gate-houses beside the river and above the dam that separates the two divisions of what used to be called Medford ponds ere this was built. It is, or rather was, a sub-waterway, the conduit of the Charlestown Water Works. At the time of its building, public water works were confined to the larger cities. The city of Charlestown, after considering various sources of supply, decided upon Medford pond, whose watershed extended backward to the divide between the Ipswich and Aberjona rivers in Wilmington. By natural configuration Medford pond lent itself well to the design. The Narrows, or the Partings, were the names by which the location of the impounding dam had been previously known. It must have been a picturesque spot. We have found no view of it preserved by artist's brush or pencil of those pre-camera days, but have heard it much spoken of. Two wedge-shaped portions of Medford and West Cambridge extended into the pond so nearly that a plank