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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 60 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 48 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 20 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 12 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Trinummus: The Three Pieces of Money (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding). You can also browse the collection for Jupiter (Canada) or search for Jupiter (Canada) in all documents.

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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 4, line 271 (search)
ll not speake: it is to knowe: ne yet I doe entende To tell how Scython variably digressing from his kinde, Was sometime woman, sometime man, as liked best his minde. And Celmus also wyll I passe, who for bicause he cloong Most faithfully to Jupiter when Jupiter was yoong, Is now become an Adamant. So will I passe this howre To shew you how the Curets were engendred of a showre: Or how that Crocus and his love faire Smylax turned were To little flowres. With pleasant newes your mindes Jupiter was yoong, Is now become an Adamant. So will I passe this howre To shew you how the Curets were engendred of a showre: Or how that Crocus and his love faire Smylax turned were To little flowres. With pleasant newes your mindes now will I chere. Learne why the fountaine Salmacis diffamed is of yore, Why with his waters overstrong it weakeneth men so sore That whoso bathes him there commes thence a perfect man no more. The operation of this Well is knowne to every wight. But few can tell the cause thereof, the which I will recite. The waternymphes did nurce a sonne of Mercuries in Ide Begot on Venus, in whose face such beautie did abide, As well therein his father both and mother might be knowne, Of whome he a
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 7, line 552 (search)
folke there strowed I did spie Even like as from a shaken twig when rotten Apples drop, Or Mast from Beches, Holmes or Okes when Poales doe scare their top. Yon stately Church with greeces long against our Court you see: It is the shrine of Jupiter. What Wight was he or shee That on those Altars burned not their frankincense in vaine? How oft, yet even with Frankincense that partly did remaine Still unconsumed in their hands, did die both man and wife, As ech of them with mutuall care di up and downe unmourned for at all. In fine so farre outrageously this helpelesse Murren raves, There was not wood inough for fire, nor ground inough for graves. Astonied at the stourenesse of so stout a storme of ills I said: O father Jupiter whose mightie power fulfills Both Heaven and Earth, if flying fame report thee not amisse In vouching that thou didst embrace in way of Love ere this The River Asops daughter, faire Aegina even by name, And that to take me for thy sonne tho
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 8, line 152 (search)
As soone as Minos came aland in Crete, he by and by Performde his vowes to Jupiter in causing for to die A hundred Bulles for sacrifice. And then he did adorne His Pallace with the enmies spoyles by conquest wonne beforne. The slaunder of his house encreast: and now appeared more The mothers filthie whoredome by the monster that she bore Of double shape, an ugly thing. This shamefull infamie, This monster borne him by his wife he mindes by pollicie To put away, and in a house with many nookes and krinks From all mens sights and speach of folke to shet it up he thinks. Immediatly one Daedalus renowmed in that lande For fine devise and workmanship in building, went in hand To make it. He confounds his worke with sodaine stops and stayes, And with the great uncertaintie of sundrie winding wayes Leades in and out, and to and fro, at divers doores astray. And as with trickling streame the Brooke Maeander seemes to play In Phrygia, and with doubtfull race runnes counter to an
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 10, line 143 (search)
ve. Of Jove the heavenly King I oft have shewed the glorious power. I erst in graver verse The Gyants slayne in Phlaegra feeldes with thunder, did reherse. But now I neede a meelder style to tell of prettie boyes That were the derlings of the Gods: and of unlawfull joyes That burned in the brests of Girles, who for theyr wicked lust According as they did deserve, receyved penance just. The King of Goddes did burne erewhyle in love of Ganymed The Phrygian and the thing was found which Jupiter that sted Had rather bee than that he was. Yit could he not beteeme The shape of any other Bird than Aegle for to seeme And so he soring in the ayre with borrowed wings trust up The Trojane boay who still in heaven even yit dooth beare his cup, And brings him Nectar though against Dame Junos will it bee. And thou Amyclys sonne (had not thy heavy destinee Abridged thee before thy tyme) hadst also placed beene By Phoebus in the firmament. How bee it (as is seene) Thou art eternall so f