hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 282 results in 94 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
ary 2. Rivers' Bridge February 3. Binnaker's Bridge, South Edisto River, February 9. Orangeburg, North Edisto River, February 11-12. Columbia February 15-17. Fayetteville, N. C., March 11. Cape Fear March 18. Cox's Bridge, Neuse River, March 19-20. Battle of Bentonville March 20-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Wash865. Salkehatchie Swamp, S. C., February 2-5. Fishburn's Plantation, near Lane's Bridge, Salkehatchie River, February 6. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Columbia February 15-17. Cox's Bridge, Neuse River, February 19-20. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 20-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh, N. C., April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his arm
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
sion, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to May, 1863. Lee's Brigade, Defenses of Newberne, N. C., to June, 1863. Service. Camp on banks of the Trent near Newberne till December 12, 1862. Foster's Expedition to Goldsboro December 12-20. Kinston December 14. Whitehall December 16. Goldsboro December 17. Reconnoissance toward Trenton January 17-22, 1863. Duty as post guard at Newberne January 26 to April 25. Moved to mouth of the Trent, south side of the Neuse River, April 25. Expedition toward Kinston, up the Atlantic & N. C. Railroad, April 27-May 1. Dover Road and Wise's Cross Roads April 28. Camp near Fort Spinola, mouth of Trent, till June 24. Company C detached at Morehead City November 29, 1862, to January 3, 1863. Company G at Fort Macon till April 25. Company I at Morehead City January 3 to April 25, and at Fort Spinola till June 24. Regiment moved to Morehead City June 24 and embarked for Boston, Mass., arriving at Fort
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
ry 22-27. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Faced Ridge February 23-25. Railroad guard duty between Chattanooga and Allatoona, Ga., till November. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Ogeechee River December 7-9. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Salkehatchie Swamps, S. C., February 2-5. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Columbia February 15-17. Cox's Bridge, Neuse River, N. C., March 19-20. Battle of Bentonville March 20-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D. C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June. Duty there and at Little Rock, Ark., till August. Mustered out Companies A, B, C, D, E, F and G November 4, 1864, to January 9, 186
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
K August, 1862. Duty in the Dept. of North Carolina, 18th and 10th Army Corps, to March, 1863. Service. Burnside's Expedition to Roanoke Island, N. C., January 6-February 7, 1862 (Detachment). Battle of Roanoke Island February 8 (Detachment). Siege of Fort Macon April 12-26. Action at South Mills April 19. Tranter's Creek June 2 and 5. Reconnoissance from Washington, N. C., to Tranter's Creek June 24 (Detachment). Swift's Creek Bridge June 27. Swift Creek and Neuse River August 6. Washington August 6. Near Shiloh September 20. Rawle's Mills November 3. Foster's Expedition to Goldsboro December 11-20. Southwest Creek December 13. Kinston December 14. Whitehall December 16. Goldsboro December 17. Duty at New Berne till January, 1863. Moved to Dept. of the South January, 1863. Regiment disbanded March 31, 1863. Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 7 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 81 Enlist
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Operations at Chattahoochie River Bridge August 26-September 2. Occupation of Atlanta September 2-November 15. Near Atlanta November 9. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Averysboro, N. C., March 16. Battle of Bentonville March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 9-13. Neuse River April 10. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D. C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20. Grand Review May 24. Mustered out at Pittsburg June 14, 1865. Battery lost during service 2 Officers and 12 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 11 Enlisted men by disease. Total 25. Independent Battery F Light Artillery. (Hampton's Battery) Organized at Williamsport December 7, 1861.
wounded. On the morning of the 17th, the whole column was again in motion; Lee's brigade having the advance, reaching the railroad. The bridge spanning the Neuse River, and the telegraph-wires, were soon destroyed; companies D and H protecting the parties destroying the railroad. After the object of the expedition had been rn Nov. 15, and was assigned to the brigade commanded by Colonel Horace C. Lee, of the Twenty-seventh Massachusetts. Having encamped on the right bank of the Neuse River, very soon after its arrival two companies were detached from the regiment, and assigned to outpost duty at Newport Barracks, Captain Spooner taking command of ly expected attack; but the defeated and discouraged enemy retired, and Plymouth was thoroughly fortified undisturbed. The regiment went into barracks on the Neuse River, May 8, and was employed in the construction of earthworks and other means of defence, at Newbern, during the remainder of its stay, with the exception of the p
rve well of the country, and history will record in glowing terms their honorable conduct. A few days since, I communicated the information, entirely reliable, that floats were being prepared to buoy the ram over the principal shoals in the Neuse River, between this place and Kinston. It has been the intention from the first to bring the two iron-clads from the Roanoke and Neuse together in an attack upon Newbern. Should this movement be delayed, it will result solely from the exigencies o the one at Kinston is intended to come down on the next high water. February eighteenth, I wrote, viz.: On receiving most reliable information of the organization of a naval brigade for opening these Sounds, with the aid of the rams in Neuse and Roanoke rivers, I directed the blockading up of the Neuse with old hulks, within range of our battteries. This work is now in progress. I then proceeded to Little Washington and perfected similar arrangements in the Tar River, and fully adv
that Jeff Davis has decided upon recovering Newbern and the Sounds, probably as a preliminary step to Lee's retrograde movement in the spring. Both rams are expected down the Neuse and Roanoke in conjunction with land troops. It seems certain that the one at Kinston is intended to come down on the next high water. February eighteenth, I wrote, viz.: On receiving most reliable information of the organization of a naval brigade for opening these Sounds, with the aid of the rams in Neuse and Roanoke rivers, I directed the blockading up of the Neuse with old hulks, within range of our battteries. This work is now in progress. I then proceeded to Little Washington and perfected similar arrangements in the Tar River, and fully advised all the authorities of the rebel plans, and gave the necessary orders for foiling them, to the extent of our means. Since my return I have examined men respecting the ram at Kinston, and their in formation is positive, reliable, and confirmat
carnage. perfidious conduct of the enemy. the Virginia engages the Minnesota. wonderful results of the first day's fight. second day's fight. apparition of the Monitor. a singular scene of naval combat a drawn battle. excitement about iron vessels. discussion in the newspapers. addition of ironclads to the Federal navy. what McClellan thought of the Virginia. capture of Newbern, &c. objects of Burnside's expedition. branch's command at Newbern. the Confederate works on the Neuse River. retreat of branch. Federal occupation of Newbern. capture of Fort Macon. the entire coast of North Carolina in possession of the enemy. the sea-coast an unimportant part of the Confederate defences The series of disasters that befell the Confederates in the early months of 1862, may be distinctly and sufficiently traced to human causes. Instead of being ascribed to the mysterious dispensations of Providence, they are more properly named as the results of human mismanagement. T
ely routed, and fifteen hundred prisoners taken. On the 9th March, Gen. Bragg found the enemy several miles in rear strongly entrenched, and, after a faint attack, drew off. On the 14th, this body of the enemy, under Schofield, crossed the Neuse River, occupied Kinston, and entered Goldsboro on the 21st. The column from Wilmington reached Cox's Bridge on the Neuse River, ten miles above Goldsboro, on the 22d. It remained now for Sherman to keep the rendezvous and complete the combinatioNeuse River, ten miles above Goldsboro, on the 22d. It remained now for Sherman to keep the rendezvous and complete the combination. But to do so and make the last stage of his march, it was clear that he would have to do some more important and severe fighting than he had experienced since he and Johnston parted at Atlanta — the latter General having been put in command of the Confederate forces in the Carolinas. It appeared indeed that a formidable army was at last collecting in his pathway. Beauregard at Charlotte, had been reinforced by Cheatham and the garrison at Augusta, and had had ample time to move in the dir
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10