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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 146 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 106 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 32 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Suppliant Women (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 14 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 12 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 12 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 10 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.). You can also browse the collection for Nile or search for Nile in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 1, section 37 (search)
e; Phrath for Euphrates, either a dispersion or a flower; Diglath for Tigris, what is swift, with narrowness; and Geon for Nile, what arises from the east,--we perhaps mistake him when we suppose he literally means those four rivers; especially as to Geon or Nile, which arises from the east, while he very well knew the literal Nile arises from the south; though what further allegorical sense he had in view, is now, I fear, impossible to be determined. which ran round about the whole earth, and wNile arises from the south; though what further allegorical sense he had in view, is now, I fear, impossible to be determined. which ran round about the whole earth, and was parted into four parts. And Phison, which denotes a multitude, running into India, makes its exit into the sea, and is by the Greeks called Ganges. Euphrates also, as well as Tigris, goes down into the Red Sea. By the Red Sea is not here meant thegraphers. Now the name Euphrates, or Phrath, denotes either a dispersion, or a flower: by Tiris, or Diglath, is signified what is swift, with narrowness; and Geon runs through Egypt, and denotes what arises from the east, which the Greeks call Nile.
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 2, section 243 (search)
ter of these Ethiopians. Now when the Egyptian army had once tasted of this prosperous success, by the means of Moses, they did not slacken their diligence, insomuch that the Ethiopians were in danger of being reduced to slavery, and all sorts of destruction; and at length they retired to Saba, which was a royal city of Ethiopia, which Cambyses afterwards named Mero, after the name of his own sister. The place was to be besieged with very great difficulty, since it was both encompassed by the Nile quite round, and the other rivers, Astapus and Astaboras, made it a very difficult thing for such as attempted to pass over them; for the city was situate in a retired place, and was inhabited after the manner of an island, being encompassed with a strong wall, and having the rivers to guard them from their enemies, and having great ramparts between the wall and the rivers, insomuch, that when the waters come with the greatest violence, it can never be drowned; which ramparts make it next to