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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 146 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 106 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 32 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Suppliant Women (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 14 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 12 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 12 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 10 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Nile or search for Nile in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 711 (search)
The Nile is represented G. 3. 38 on the doors of the temple which Virg. speaks of erecting: there however the representation seems to be of the actual river, like those which were carried in triumphal processions, here of the river god. Contra facing Cleopatra in the picture of the rout. Magno corpore with Nilum, perhaps hardly with maerentem.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 713 (search)
Caeruleum gremium latebrosaque flumina e(\n dia\ duoi=n. Latebrosa seems simply to express the fact that by sailing up the Nile they were able to take refuge in Egypt.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 30 (search)
vv. 25, 26, the intermediate lines being quasi-parenthetical. The steady silent march of the army is compared to the rising of the Ganges, or the subsidence of the Nile. Surgens can hardly refer to anything but the rising of the river, which is supposed to be slow and gradual. Whether Virg. had any authority for this notion of the periodical overflow of the Ganges, we do not know. He may have confused it with the Nile, as is further made probable by the number seven, which belongs to the Nile (see 6. 800), though Serv. refers for the seven branches of the Ganges to a passage of Mela, which is either misunderstood or non-existent. To take surgens with recenNile (see 6. 800), though Serv. refers for the seven branches of the Ganges to a passage of Mela, which is either misunderstood or non-existent. To take surgens with recent commentators of the rise or source of the river would not agree well with amnibus, and would have no point as a comParison. The alliteration, as well as the spondaic movement of the line, gives a notion of slowness and quiet.