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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 146 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 106 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 32 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Suppliant Women (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 14 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 12 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 12 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 10 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan). You can also browse the collection for Nile or search for Nile in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan), BOOK II, INTRODUCTION (search)
ty of food, nor maintain its population without a supply of it. Therefore, while thinking that your design is commendable, I consider the site as not commendable; but I would have you stay with me, because I mean to make use of your services.” 4. From that time, Dinocrates did not leave the king, but followed him into Egypt. There Alexander, observing a harbour rendered safe by nature, an excellent centre for trade, cornfields throughout all Egypt, and the great usefulness of the mighty river Nile, ordered him to build the city of Alexandria, named after the king. This was how Dinocrates, recommended only by his good looks and dignified carriage, came to be so famous. But as for me, Emperor, nature has not given me stature, age has marred my face, and my strength is impaired by ill health. Therefore, since these advantages fail me, I shall win your approval, as I hope, by the help of my knowledge and my writings. 5. In my first book, I have said what I had to say about the functions of
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan), BOOK IV, CHAPTER V: HOW THE TEMPLE SHOULD FACE (search)
r and the choice is free, the temple and the statue placed in the cella should face the western quarter of the sky. This will enable those who approach the altar with offerings or sacrifices to face the direction of the sunrise in facing the statue in the temple, and thus those who are undertaking vows look toward the quarter from which the sun comes forth, and likewise the statues themselves appear to be coming forth out of the east to look upon them as they pray and sacrifice. But if the nature of the site is such as to forbid this, then the principle of determining the quarter should be changed, so that the widest possible view of the city may be had from the sanctuaries of the gods. Furthermore, temples that are to be built beside rivers, as in Egypt on both sides of the Nile, ought, as it seems, to face the river banks. Similarly, houses of the gods on the sides of public roads should be arranged so that the passers-by can have a view of them and pay their devotions face to face.
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan), BOOK VIII, CHAPTER II: RAINWATER (search)
rivers Astansoba and Astoboa and a great many others, it passes through the mountains to the Cataract, and from there it dashes down, and passes to the north between Elephantis and Syene and the plains of Thebes into Egypt, where it is called the Nile. 7. That the source of the Nile is in Mauretania is known principally from the fact that there are other springs on the other side of the Atlas range flowing into the ocean to the west, and that ichneumons, crocodiles, and other animals and fishNile is in Mauretania is known principally from the fact that there are other springs on the other side of the Atlas range flowing into the ocean to the west, and that ichneumons, crocodiles, and other animals and fishes of like nature are found there, although there are no hippopotamuses. 8. Therefore, since in descriptions of the world it appears that all rivers of any size flow from the north, and since in the plains of Africa, which are exposed to the course of the sun in the south, the moisture is deeply hidden, springs not common, and rivers rare, it follows that the sources of springs which lie to the north or northeast are much better, unless they hit upon a place which is full of sulphur, alum, or