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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 655 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 189 95 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 84 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 69 69 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 26 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 24 18 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 24 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for North Anna (Virginia, United States) or search for North Anna (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ding that they had failed to capture Washington and march on to New York, as they had boasted they would do, assumed that they only defended their capital and Southern territory. Hence, Antietam, Gettysburg and all the other battles that had been fought, were by them set down as failures on our part, and victories for them. Their army believed this. It produced a morale which could only be overcome by desperate and continuous hard fighting. The battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, and Cold Harbor, bloody and terrible as they were on our side, were even more damaging to the enemy, and so crippled him as to make him wary ever after of taking the offensive. His losses in men were probably not so great, owing to the fact that we were, save in the Wilderness, almost invariably the attacking party; and when he did attack it was in the open field. The details of these battles, which for endurance and bravery on the part of the soldiery have rarely been surpassed, are gi
ere transpiring in the rear, our advance, composed of General Ouster's brigade, of the First division, was doing glorious work in the front. They forded the North Anna river, charged into Beaver Dam station, recaptured three hundred and seventy-eight Union prisoners, including colonels, majors, captains and lieutenants, belongingmanner. The road which passes here is the Virginia Central, running from Richmond to Gordonsville. The First division bivouacked on the south side of the North Anna river, while the Second and Third were on the north side. A strong picket guard was thrown out in the rear, and skirmishing was kept up all night. At daylight inly small in these engagements, mostly in wounded. Here night closed on the parties, Fitz Lee still following and harassing their rear till the enemy reached North Anna river, when, about daylight, a sharp fight was kept up, these two brigades holding their own against vastly superior numbers, and steadily driving the enemy before
attle on turnpike. Put Captain D. in position on turnpike; rode along our picket lines; fired upon by sharpshooters; moved off, after dark, with all the batteries, as we ascertained, that though we had whipped Grant badly on the fifth and sixth, he — was moving toward Richmond. Stopped at Verdiersville, near Colonel N., who had used most of the artillery engaged in this corps — his battalion alone being in. Sunday, 8th.--About one P. M. moved toward Anticon Church, on Terry's Creek of North Anna, and camped on Po river, near Shady Grove Church-thirteen miles. Monday, 9th.--Moved on to Spottsylvania New Court-house. Fighting yesterday and today at Court-house. We got between Grant and Richmond. Marched seven miles. Tuesday, 10th.--At sunrise, put Captain S. in position in Daniels' brigade, and Captain J. in position in Ramseur's line. Captain D. in reserve, but near; Captain G. in reserve, near Court-house. Captain S. was about three hundred yards from a dense pine thick
Wright, which was handsomely done. From all present indications we will have no battle this side of the line of the North Anna river. headquarters Second corps., May 22--6 A. M. Up to this hour all is quiet. Warren has crossed the Po river at Ghe slip, by a timely retreat with the main body of his army. headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25--12 M. After three weeks of marching and fighting, here, then, is the Army of the Potomac, sixty miles from its starting point north of the Rapidan, safely planted south of the North Anna river, and within twenty-five miles of the objective point which, for three years, has been the goal of all the bloody struggles of this army. The hasty dein turning the fortified lines of Spottsylvania and the tactical operations of yesterday and to-day, in crossing the North Anna river, and the actions succeeding the passage. Taken together, they form, perhaps, the most substantial successes of the
Motley House, May 22. The headquarters of the Ninth corps were established here at daylight. The corps is about leaving, and will proceed to-day to Bethel Church, seven miles beyond. The Sixth corps is now passing down the road in the direction taken by the Fifth corps last evening. The affair last night, indicated by the cannonading, was the holding in check of the enemy's strong rear guard by Burnside and Wright, which was handsomely done. From all present indications we will have no battle this side of the line of the North Anna river.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25-- (search)
headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25--12 M. After three weeks of marching and fighting, here, then, is the Army of the Potomac, sixty miles from its starting point north of the Rapidan, safely planted south of the North Anna river, and within twenty-five miles of the objectivNorth Anna river, and within twenty-five miles of the objective point which, for three years, has been the goal of all the bloody struggles of this army. The hasty despatches which alone it has been possible to send amid the turmoil of action have acquainted you with the more salient facts at least in our later movements, and I shall confine these notes to the record of the operations of thmprise the strategic operations employed in turning the fortified lines of Spottsylvania and the tactical operations of yesterday and to-day, in crossing the North Anna river, and the actions succeeding the passage. Taken together, they form, perhaps, the most substantial successes of the campaign, and have been gained with a gra