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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse of the honourable receiving into England of the first Ambassador from the Emperor of Russia, in the yeere of Christ 1556. and in the third yeere of the raigne of Queen Marie, serving for the third voyage to Moscovie. Registred by Master John Incent Pro tonotarie. (search)
divine service ended, he eftsoones was remitted and reduced to his barge, and so repaired to his lodging, in like order and gratulation of the people universally, as before. The time of the yeere hasting the protection and departure of the Ambassador, the merchants having prepared foure goodly and well trimmed shippes laden with all kinds of merchandises apt for Russia , the same Ambassadour making provision for such things as him pleased, the same ships in good order valed downe the River of Thames, from London to Gravesend , where the same Ambassadour with his traine and furniture was imbarked to wards his voyage homeward, which God prosper in all felicitie. It is also to be remembred, that during the whole abode of the sayd Ambassadour in England, the Agents of the sayde marchants did not onely prosecute and pursue the matter of restitution in Scotland , and caused such things to be laden in an English shippe hired purposely to convey the Ambassadours goods to London, there
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Commission given by sir Rowland Hayward knight, and George Barne, Aldermen and governours of the company of English Merchants, for discovery of new trades, unto Arthur Pet, and Charles Jackman, for a voyage by them to be made, for discovery of Cathay, 1580. in forme following. (search)
d partie, and Charles Jackman of Popler, in the said Countie of Middlesex, Captaine, Master and ruler of the good barke, called the William of London, of the burthen of 20. tunnes, or thereabouts, (which barkes are now riding at anker in the river of Thames against Limehouse ) on the third partie: witnesseth, that the said Governours, and company have hired the saide Arthur Pet, to serve in the said barke, called the George, with nine men and a boy: And likewise the said Charles Jackman, to serour discretions. And now for your good direction in this. voyage, we would have you with the next good winde and weather, that God shall send thereunto meete and convenient, after the 22. day of this present moneth of May, saile from this river of Thames, to the coast of Finmarke, to the North Cape there, or to the Wardhouse, and from thence direct your course to have sight of Willoughbies land, and from it passe alongst to the Nova Zemla, keeping the same landes alwayes in your sight on you
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Instructions made by the company of English merchants for discovery of new trades, unto Richard Gibs, William Biggat, John Backhouse, William Freeman, John Haly, and James Woodcock, &c. masters of the 9 ships, and one barke that we had freighted for a voiage with them to be made (by the grace of God) from hence to S. Nicholas in Russia , and backe againe: which ships being now in the river of Thames are presently ready to depart upon the said voyage, with the next apt winds that may serve thereunto: and with this Fleet afterwards was joined M. Christopher Carlisle with the Tyger. The 1 of June 1582. (search)
Instructions made by the company of English merchants for discovery of new trades, unto Richard Gibs, William Biggat, John Backhouse, William Freeman, John Haly, and James Woodcock, &c. masters of the 9 ships, and one barke that we had freighted for a voiage with them to be made (by the grace of God) from hence to S. Nicholas in Russia , and backe againe: which ships being now in the river of Thames are presently ready to depart upon the said voyage, with the next apt winds that may serve thereunto: and with this Fleet afterwards was joined M. Christopher Carlisle with the Tyger. The 1 of June 1582. FORASMUCH as the number of shippes which we purpose to send in this Fleete together for Saint Nicholas in Russia is greater then at any time heretofore wee have sent thither, as also for that some speeches are given out that you shall be met withall by such as with force & violence will assault you as enemies, to the end that good order may be established among you for keeping toge
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The miraculous victory atchieved by the English Fleete, under the discreet and happy conduct of the right honourable, right prudent, and valiant lord, the L. Charles Howard, L. high Admirall of England, &c. Upon the Spanish huge Armada sent in the yeere 1588. for the invasion of England, together with the wofull and miserable successe of the said Armada afterward, upon the coasts of Norway , of the Scottish Westerne Isles, of Ireland , of Spaine, of France, and of England, &c. Recorded in Latine by Emanuel van Meteran in the 15. booke of his history of the low Countreys. (search)
te and faithfull captaines. And whereas it was commonly given out that the Spaniard having once united himselfe unto the duke of Parma , ment to invade by the river of Thames, there was at Tilburie in Essex over-against Gravesend , a mightie army encamped, and on both sides of the river fortifications were erected, according to thof their conflict, to passe by, and to land his souldiers upon the Downes. The Spanish captives reported that they were determined first to have entred the river of Thames, and thereupon to have passed with small ships up to London, supposing that they might easily winne that rich and flourishing Citie being but meanely fortifiee coast, which he thought to be most convenient. Which invasion (as the captives afterward confessed) the Duke of Parma thought first to have attempted by the river of Thames; upon the bankes whereof having at his first arrivall landed twenty or thirty thousand of his principall souldiers, he supposed that he might easily have woon
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage made with the shippes called the Holy Crosse, and the Mathew Gonson, to the Iles of Candia and Chio, about the yeere 1534, according to a relation made to Master Richard Hackluit, by John Williamson, Cooper and citizen of London, who lived in the yere 1592, and went as cooper in the Mathew Gonson the next voyage after. (search)
William Gonson, paymaster of the kings navie. In this first voyage went William Holstocke (who afterwards was Controuller of her Majesties Navie, lately deceased) as page to M. Richard Gonson aforesaid, which M. Gonson died in Chio in this his first voyage. The ship called the Holy Crosse was a short shippe, and of burden 160 tunnes. And having beene a full yeere at the sea in performance of this voyage, with great danger she returned home, where, upon her arrivall at Blackwall, in the river of Thames, her wine and oyle caske was found so weake, that they were not able to hoyse them out of the ship, but were constrayned to draw them as they lay, and put their wine and oyle into new vessels, and so to unlade the shippe. Their chiefe fraight, was very excellent Muscatels and red Malmesie, the like whereof were seeldome scene before in England. They brought home also good quantitie of sweete oyles, cotton woolles, Turkie Carpets, Galles, Cynamon, and some other spices. The saide shippe
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. John Eldred to Trypolis in Syria by sea, and from thence by land and river to Babylon and Balsara. 1583. (search)
ace, who laudably supplied the same roome 3. yeeres. In which meane time, I made two voyages more unto Babylon, and returned by the way aforesayd, over the deserts of Arabia . And afterwards, as one desirous to see other parts of the countrey, I went from Aleppo to Antioch , which is thence 60. English miles, and from thence went downe to Tripolis, where going aboord a small vessell, I arrived at Joppe, and travelled to Rama, Lycia , Gaza , Jerusalem, Bethleem , to the river of Jordan , and the sea or lake of Zodome, and returned backe to Joppe, & from thence by sea to Tripolis, of which places because many others have published large discourses, I surcease to write. Within few dayes after imbarking my selfe at Tripolis the 22. of December, I arrived (God be thanked) in safety here in the river of Thames with divers English marchants, the 26. of March, 1588, in the Hercules of London, which was the richest ship of English marchants goods that ever was knowen to come into this realme.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage to Barbary in the yeere 1552. Set foorth by the right worshipfull Sir John Yorke, Sir William Gerard, Sir Thomas Wroth, Master Frances Lambert, Master Cole, and others; Written by the relation of Master James Thomas then Page to Master Thomas Windham chiefe Captaine of this voyage. (search)
The second voyage to Barbary in the yeere 1552. Set foorth by the right worshipfull Sir John Yorke, Sir William Gerard, Sir Thomas Wroth, Master Frances Lambert, Master Cole, and others; Written by the relation of Master James Thomas then Page to Master Thomas Windham chiefe Captaine of this voyage. THE shippes that went on this voyage were three, whereof two were of the River of Thames, That is to say, the Lyon of London, whereof Master Thomas Windham was Captaine and part owner, of about an hundred & fiftie tunnes: The other was the Buttolfe about fourescore tunnes, and a Portugall Caravel bought of certaine Portugals in Newport in Wales, and fraighted for this voyage, of summe sixtie tunnes. The number of men in the Fleete were an hundred and twentie. The Master of the Lyon was one John Kerry of Mynhed in Somersetshire , his Mate was David Landman. The chiefe Captaine of this small Fleete was Master Thomas Windham a Norffolke gentleman borne, but dwelling at Marshfieldparke in So
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage to Guinea set out by Sir George Barne, Sir John Yorke, Thomas Lok, Anthonie Hickman and Edward Castelin, in the yere 1554. The Captaine whereof was M. John Lok. (search)
e mariners facultie. Not therefore assuming to my selfe the commendations due unto other, neither so bold as in any part to change or otherwise dispose the order of this voyage so well observed by art and experience, I have thought good to set forth the same, in such sort and phrase of speech as is commonly used among them, and as I received it of the said Pilot, as I have said. Take it therefore as followeth. In the yeere of our Lord 1554 the eleventh day of October, we departed the river of Thames with three goodly ships, the one called the Trinitie, a ship of the burden of seven-score tunne, the other called the Bartholomew, a ship of the burden of ninetie, the third was the John Evangelist, a ship of seven score tunne. With the sayd ships and two pinnesses (whereof the one was drowned on the coast of England) we went forward on our voyage, and stayed at Dover fourteene dayes. We staied also at Rie three or foure dayes. Moreover last of all we touched at Dartmouth . The first
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage to Benin , set foorth by Master John Newton, and Master John Bird Marchants of London in the yeere 1590 with a ship called the Richard of Arundell of the burthen of one hundreth tunnes, and a small pinnesse, in which voyage Master James Welsh was chiefe Maister. (search)
r, and right over the river was a high tuft of trees. The 17 we ankered in the rivers mouth, and then we found the land to be Cavo de las Palmas, and betweene us & the cape was a great ledge of rockes, one league and a halfe into the sea, and they bare to the West of the Cape, we saw also an Island off the point of the foreland, thus it waxed night that we could perceive no more of the lande, but onely that it trended in like a bay, where there runneth a streame as if it were in the river of Thames, and this was the change day of the Moone. The 19 a faire temperate day, and the wind South, we went East, and the lande a sterne of us West, and it shewed low by the water side like Islands, this was the east of Cavo de las Palmas, and it trended in with a great sound, and we went East all night, and in the morning wee were but 3 or 4 leagues from the shore. The 20 we were thwart of a river called Rio de los Barbos. The 21 we went along the shore East, & 3 or 4 leagues to t
iance, will yet be summoned, unless a blight or blast shall smite the head of every American statesman in America — shall be summoned to the American standard wherever that flag advances. (Great applause.) And it is not my opinion that our Generals, when any man comes to the standard and desires to defend the flag, will find it important to light a candle to see what is the complexion of his face, or to consult the family Bible to ascertain whether his grandfather came from the banks of the Thames or the banks of the Senegal. (Applause.) But all they who have attempted to overthrow the national Constitution, which was their aegis as well as ours, to destroy their American liberty as well as ours, to overthrow the hopes of their posterity as well as ours, to destroy civil society and social life in their own midst, shall find that their peculiar patriarchal institution, staggering, shall fall beneath their own parricidal stroke; whether they count it misfortune or not, it will be thei
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