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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 84 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 30 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 14 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for White Oak (North Carolina, United States) or search for White Oak (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
s and Kemper's battery, followed Heintzelman's retreat at night, and crossing White Oak marched to Glendale, near the junction of the Charles City and Long Bridge roads. The passage across White Oak was skillfully broken up and the roads approaching it obstructed. Franklin, with two divisions and a brigade, stood on the south ng at Franklin with his artillery, and Franklin was preventing his passage of White Oak, McClellan was posting the divisions of Hooker, McCall, Sedgwick, Kearny and not reach the field of battle on the 30th. Jackson, whom Franklin stopped at White Oak, served no other purpose on the 30th that to keep Franklin's division and hist, and Magruder and Holmes on his right. He felt sure that Jackson, crossing White Oak, would be in time to fall on the Federal right and rear. General Lee and theions leaving the field under the cover of darkness, followed by Franklin from White Oak, to take their places in McClellan's last line on the James river. There is
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
in Weston. As a member of this company he was in most of the severe fighting in which they participated until the battle of Sharpsburg, where he was so severely wounded that he was compelled to retire from active service. After remaining at Richmond for some time as a detailed man after the surrender, he returned home and engaged in farming. In December, 1866, he was married to Sibbie C. Coleman. In 1890 he was elected to the State legislature, serving one term. His present home, near White Oak, is one of the handsomest in the county. Milton Pyles Tribble Milton Pyles Tribble was born in Laurens county, S. C., August 27, 1840. His father, John A. Tribble, a native of Laurens county and a farmer by occupation, still resides in that county, at the age of eighty-seven. The mother of Colonel Tribble was Susan Pyles, daughter of Dr. Abner Pyles. She died in 1859. Colonel Tribble received his education at one of the old field schools of Laurens county, and in April, 1861, he e