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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 31, 1860., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
fic States (vols. 1-5, 1874), History of Central America (vols. 6-8, 1883-87), History of Mexico (vols. 9-14, 1883-87), History of the Northern Mexican States and Texas (vols. 15-16, 1884-89), History of Arizona and New Mexico (vol. 17, 1889), History of California (vols. 18-24, 1884-90), History of Nevada, Colorado, and Wyoming (vol. 25, 1890), History of Utah (vol. 26, 1889), History of the North-West Coast (vols. 27-28, 1884), History of Oregon (vols. 29-30, 1886-88), History of Washington, Idaho, and Montana (vol. 31, 1890), History of British Columbia (vol. 32, 1887), History of Alaska (vol. 33, 1886), California pastorals (vol. 34, 1888), California inter Pocula (vol. 35, 1888), Popular Tribunals (vols. 36-37, 1887), Essays and miscellany (vol. 38, 1890), and Literary Industries (vol. 39, 1890). Neither Bancroft nor his assistants had the preliminary training to save them from the ordinary pitfalls along the path of the scholar. They carried to their tasks uncritical e
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
the intellectual development of Europe, the, 180, 236 History of the Missouri River, 134 History of the Northern Mexican States and Texas, 195 History of the North-West Coast, 196 History of the precious Metals, a, 440 History of the rise of the Huguenots, 180 History of the standard Oil Trust, 293 History of the United States during the Administrations of Jefferson and Madison, 199 History of the United States for schools, a, 193 History of Utah, 196 History of Washington, Idaho, and Montana, 196 His wife's father, 290 Hittell, Theodore H., 153 Hive or Beestock, 573 Hoar, G. F., 351, 363, 364, 419 Hobbes, 263 Hodder, Frank H., 134 Hodge, Charles, 201-3, 204, 209, 340 Hodge, F. W., 159 Hodgson, 251 Hoffding, Prof., 248 n. Holdsworth, Edward, 445 Holland, J. G., 38, 48, 73, 74, 75, 310, 311, 416 Holland, Lord, 454 Holley, Marietta, 26 Holman, Frederick V., 140 Holmes, Mary Jane, 69 Holmes, O. W., 5, 36, 69, 119, 305, 306,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Development of the free soil idea in the United States. (search)
ry line of Florida followed the St. Mary's river from its mouth to its source, thence west to the Chattahoochee, thence along that stream to the 31st parallel, thence west to the Mississippi river, including the present State of Florida, parts of Alabama and Mississippi, and some parts of the present Louisiana. It also included all that territory west of the Rockies and north of the 42d parallel to the British possessions, and from the Rocky mountains to the Pacific, including Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and part of Wyoming, thereby extinguishing the Spanish claims to this vast area. Florida proper was acquired with the institution of slavery existing, and was not subject to the restriction of the Missouri compromise, as claimed by one school of politicians and subject to the restriction as claimed by the other. Slavery was neither prohibited nor sanctioned by the terms of this grant. About the same time this government ceded to Spain that country between Louisiana and the Rio Gra
ed only by bloodletting. The Republicans, fresh from a visit to their constituents, confirm this opinion. They are more defiant than ever. Doolittle, in his speech in the Senate yesterday, haughtily and insultingly told the Southern Senators that it was idle to talk about amending the Constitution, for they (the Republicans) intended to amend it to suit themselves. This is what Seward is after in his proposition to admit all the Territories at once as States. Kansas, Nebraska, Washington, Idaho, Nevada and Utah will become Northern States, adding twelve to the Republican strength in the Senate. Very soon they will have the two-thirds requisite to amend the Constitution, and reconstruct the Supreme Court according to their own notions. Meantime, the fact of Anderson's holding South Carolina in check, will stiffen the Republican neck. They foresee that Fort Monroe will do as much for Virginia. With the navy they will blockade all our ports. Of a certainty, they will whip u