Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Orleans, La. (Louisiana, United States) or search for Orleans, La. (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Emancipation proclamations. (search)
Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. And by virtue of the power and for the purpose afo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Walker, Alexander 1819-1893 (search)
Walker, Alexander 1819-1893 Journalist; born in Fredericksburg, Va., Oct. 13, 1819; graduated at the law department of the University of Virginia; settled in New Orleans, La., where he established a law practice and engaged in journalism; was editor at different times of the Louisiana Democracy, the Delta, the Times, the Picayune, and the Herald. His publications include Jackson and New Orleans; Life of Andrew Jackson; History of the battle of Shiloh; Duelling in Louisiana; The story of the plague, a history of the yellow fever epidemic of 1852, etc. He died in Fort Scott, Ark., Jan. 24, 1893.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White League. (search)
estigation has been made, and the civil authorities in all but a few cases have been unable to arrest, convict, and punish perpetrators. Consequently, there are no correct records to be consulted for information. There is ample evidence, however, to show that more than 1,200 persons have been killed and wounded during this time, on account of their political sentiments. Frightful massacres have occurred in the parishes of Bossier, Caddo, Catahoula, Saint Bernard, Saint Landry, Grant, and Orleans. The general character of the massacres in the abovenamed parishes is so well known that it is unnecessary to describe them. The isolated cases can best be illustrated by the following instances which I have taken from a mass of evidence now lying before me of men killed on account of their political principles. In Natchitoches parish the number of isolated cases reported is thirty-three. In the parish of Bienville the number of men killed is thirty. In Red River parish the number of is