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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
ince the war he has been a farmer in Pickens county, and has held the positions of deputy collector of internal revenue and postmaster. He was married, October 16, 1867, to Temperance Looper, and they have one daughter, now Mrs. Nora Gertrude Harris. Robert E. Hill, born in Abbeville county, S. C., January 14, 1839, is a son of Judge William Hill, who served as probate judge of Abbeville country for seventeen years and was a soldier in the Seminole war. He was a native of Ireland, county Antrim, and came to America alone in 1822, at the age of seventeen. In 1824 he married Anna Hamilton Donald, daughter of Maj. John Donald, of Abbeville county. Judge Robert E. Hill was reared on a farm and finished his education at Erskine college. In 1859 he made a trip to the native land of his father, visiting also England and Scotland. In the fall of 1861 he volunteered as a private in Company A, Second South Carolina rifles, was promoted to corporal, and finally to sergeant, and served on t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heroes of the old Camden District, South Carolina, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. (search)
. But the heroism of our troops was not confined to their leaders. The descendants of those, who had fought under the Brattons and McLures in the Revolution, were as brave as their leaders and as conscientious in the discharge of their duty. In that old Waxhaw churchyard I have seen this quaint inscription upon a stone: Here lies the body of William Blair, who departed this life in the sixty-fourth year of his age on the 2d July, A. D, 1821, at 9 P. M. He was born in the county of Antrim, Ireland, on the 24th March, 1759. When about thirteen years old he came with his father to this country, where he resided till his death. He was a Revolutionary patriot, and in the humble station of private soldier and wagon master, he contributed more to the establishment of American independence than many whose names are proudly emblazoned on the page of history. In the language of Pope, The noblest work of God is an honest man. There was more truth in this old homely epitaph p