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upon it, so as to retain a sufficient number at home for police purposes. For this purpose a county court, consisting of a justice and quorum, ordered a draft for a certain number of men to stay at home. This draft stopped my brother, who was about to start for New Orleans-making him the exception of my father's adult sons who were not engaged in the defence of the country during the War of 1812. The part of the county in which my father resided was at that time sparsely settled. Wilkinson County is the southwestern county of the State. Its western boundary is the Mississippi River. The land near the river, although very hilly, was quite rich. Toward the east it fell off into easy ridges, the soil became thin, and the eastern boundary was a pine country. My father's residence was at the boundary line between the two kinds of soil. The population of the county, in the western portion of it, was generally composed of Kentuckians, Virginians, Tennesseeans, and the like; whil
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
ith Andrew Jackson, and gaining from that great soldier special mention of their gallantry in the battle of New Orleans. Samuel Davis, after the Revolution removed to Kentucky, resided there a few years and then changed his home to Wilkinson county, Mississippi. Jefferson Davis received his academic education in early boyhood at home, and was then sent to Transylvania university in Kentucky, where he remained until 1824, the sixteenth year of his age. During that year he was appointed by Pr Davis, elder brother of Jefferson Davis, a soldier of the war of 1812; grandson of Samuel Emory Davis, the revolutionary soldier; and great grandson of Evan Davis, who was prominent in colonial public affairs. General Davis was born in Wilkinson county, Miss., at Woodside, January 12, 1825, and was educated at Nashville, and at Miami university, Ohio, also being graduated from the law school of that State. He began the practice of law in 1851 and at the same time engaged extensively in farmi
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical. (search)
and Alfred Iverson. He served through the Atlanta campaign, leading his division skillfully through the various cavalry engagements, his men fighting with equal valor as troopers and as infantry. Toward the close of the year 1864 he was assigned to the command of the district of Northwest Mississippi. Here he was employed until the close of the struggle, protecting the people against raiding bands as far as his resources would permit. Brigadier-General Carnot Posey was born in Wilkinson county, Miss., in August, 1818. When the Mexican war began in 1846 he entered the Mississippi Rifle regiment commanded by Col. Jefferson Davis, holding the rank of first lieutenant. Every one is familiar with the story of Jefferson Davis and his Rifles at the battle of Buena Vista; how, at a critical moment, when on one part of the field the day seemed lost, the gallant Mississippians, under the lead of their talented and heroic colonel, made one of the most brilliant charges of the whole war,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Fredericksburg.—From the morning of the 20th of April to the 6th of May, 1863. (search)
e of the river. I was now satisfied that the enemy's movement up the opposite side of the river in the morning was a feint; that an advance would be made on Fredericksburg, and that our sojourn in that city would soon be terminated. The enemy's pickets soon advanced from Deep Run, drove General Early's pickets back to the railroad and moved up the turnpike toward Fredericksburg. I immediately threw back the right of my picket line, composed of Company E, under Lieutenant Mc-Neely, of Wilkinson county, and Company G, under Lieutenant Mills, of Leak county, and established it from the gas-house up Hazel Run to the railroad, with videttes along the railroad toward Hamilton station, connecting with General Early's pickets. The enemy's pickets continued to advance and engaged my pickets, but being supported by a line of infantry, failed to drive them from their position. It was now dark. Helpless and alone, the Twenty-first regiment, with four hundred muskets, was facing and resisting
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association Listens to a masterly oration by Judge Charles E. Fenner. (search)
ife, crowded up to the eloquent speaker as he closed and thanked him for his bold and true defense of the immortal principles of the Constitution. Judge Fenner spoke as follows: Jefferson Davis was born on the 3rd of June, 1808, in Christian (now Todd) county, Kentucky. He came of revolutionary stock. His father and two of his uncles rendered honorable service as soldiers in the revolutionary army. During his childhood his father removed first to Louisiana, and then to Wilkinson county, Mississippi. He received his primary education in the local schools, and then became a student at Transylvania University, in Lexington, Ky., where he studied until November, 1823, when, at the age of fifteen years, he was oppointed to West Point, where he was a contemporary, amongst others, of his life-long friends, Albert Sidney Johnston, Bishop Leonidas Polk and Alexander Dallas Bache. He graduated honorably in 1828; received his brevet as lieutenant of infantry, and was immediately o
Virginia. --At a recent meeting of the citizens of Wilkinson county, Miss., the following resolution, among others, was passed: Resolved, That it would do violence to our feelings to omit, on this occasion, our tribute to the "mother of States and of Statesmen;" that the quiet dignity with which Virginia took her place in the van, and grandly bared her bosom to the storm of war, and the promptitude with which her sons, in themselves a formidable host, rushed to the standard of freedom, challenges our highest admiration; while the atrocities perpetrated by the brutal invaders of her soil, excites our deepest indignation, and elicits for her sufferers our profoundest sympathies: and that words fail us when we would express our emotions for the exuberant kindness displayed by her citizens to our sick and wounded sons; we can only utter the universal prayer of the South--"May the richest blessings of Almighty God be lavished upon the sons and daughters of the Old Dominion."
y informs us that in one neighborhood in that county, thirty-two twin children have been born since January of this year --thirty one of whom were boys. These were all born under the care of one midwife, and were doing well when our informant left. Instead of the Ganary of Cape Verde Islands, usually recommended to an husbands, we would suggest this locality, as being altogether more convenient and accessible. Compliment to Virginia. At a recent meeting of the citizens of Wilkinson county, Miss., the following resolution, among others, was passed: Resolved, That it would do violence to our feelings to omit, on this occasion, our tribute to the "Mother of States and of Statesmen;" that the quiet with which Virginia took her place in the van, and grandly bared her bosom to the storm of war, and the promptitude with which her sons, in themselves a formidable host, rushed to the standard of freedom, challenges our highest admiration; while the atrocities perpetrated by t
Clothing for the soldiers. Camp near Centreville., Nov. 15, 1861. Editors Dispatch. I see, from your paper, that a record has been kept of contributions of winter clothing to our army. As a part of that record, allow me to state that Messrs. Hughes. Bryan & Dameron have lately reached here, from Wilkinson county, Mississippi, with $20,000 worth of blankets, overcoats, pantaloons, shoes, socks, woolen underclothes, &c., for three companies from that county; now in the 18th and 21st Mississippi regiments. The clothing was all made up by the ladies of the county, from wool grown, spun, and woven in the county the shoes from leather tanned there, and the blankets were principally from from the private bedding of the citizens. These gentlemen came to this place direct from Lynchburg, and therefore their report was not made to her sons in Richmond. Very respectfully, A. C. Holt.