Your search returned 46 results in 22 document sections:

1 2 3
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Liii. (search)
of erring on what many would call the weak side, had it not been balanced by an unusual degree of strong practical good sense and judgment. The Secretary of War, and generals in command, were frequently much annoyed at being overruled,--the discipline and efficiency of the service being thereby, as they considered, greatly endangered. But there was no going back of the simple signature, A. Lincoln, attached to proclamation or reprieve. My friend Kellogg, representative from Essex County, New York, received a despatch one evening from the army, to the effect that a young townsman, who had been induced to enlist through his instrumentality, had, for a serious misdemeanor, been convicted by a court-martial, and was to be shot the next day. Greatly agitated, Mr. Kellogg went to the Secretary of War, and urged, in the strongest manner, a reprieve. Stanton was inexorable. Too many cases of the kind had been let off, he said; and it was time an example was made. Exhausting his el
esterday, has been accomplished. The frigate Constitution has lain for a long time at this port substantially at the mercy of the armed mob which sometimes paralyzes the otherwise loyal State of Maryland. Deeds of daring, successful contests, and glorious victories, had rendered Old Ironsides so conspicuous in the naval history of the country, that she was fitly chosen as the school in which to train the future officers of the navy to like heroic acts. It was given to Massachusetts and Essex County first to man her; it was reserved to Massachusetts to have the honor to retain her for the service of the Union and the laws. This is a sufficient triumph of right — a sufficient triumph for us. By this the blood of our friends shed by the Baltimore mob is in so far avenged. The Eighth Regiment may hereafter cheer lustily upon all proper occasions, but never without orders. The old Constitution, by their efforts, aided untiringly by the United States officers having her in charge, is
meantime, he had traveled considerably over Europe, and learned something of the ways of the world. In 1849, he removed with his family to North Elba, Essex County, New York, to some land given him by Gerrit Smith. He went thither expressly to counsel and benefit the negroes settled in that vicinity, on lands like-wise bestowafterward, they brought a very excellent price. Early in April following, he was in Ashtabula County, Ohio, sick of the ague. He visited his family in Essex County, New York, toward the end of that month. In May, he was in New York City, Rochester, and Boston, where he learned to manufacture crackers. On the 3d of June, he wlso another widow, Mrs. Thompson, whose husband fell here. Whether she is a mother or not, I cannot say. All these, my wife included, live at North Elba, Essex County, New York. I have a middle-aged son, who has been, in some degree, a cripple from his childhood, who would have as much as he could well do to earn a living. He w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crown Point, (search)
Crown Point, A town in Essex county, N. Y., 90 miles north of Albany, which was quite an important tradingstation between the English and the Indians until 1731, when the French took possession of the cape projecting into Lake Champlain on its western side, and built a military work there, which they called Fort Frederick. The plan of the campaign for 1755 in the French and Indian War contemplated an expedition against the French at Crown Point, to be commanded by William Johnson. He accomplished more than Braddock or Shirley, yet failed to achieve the main object of the expedition. The Assembly of New York had voted £8,000 towards the enlistment in Connecticut of 2,000 men for the Niagara and Crown Point expedition; and after hearing of Braddock's defeat, they raised 400 men of their own, in addition to 800 which they had already in the field. The troops destined for the northern expedition, about 6,000 in number, were drawn from New England, New Jersey, and New York. They
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Watson, Winslow Cossoul 1803- (search)
Watson, Winslow Cossoul 1803- Author; born in Albany, N. Y., Dec. 22, 1803. He published Pioneer history of the Champlain Valley, giving an account of the settlement of the town of Willsboro, by William Gilliland, together with his journal and other papers, and a Memoir; The history of Essex county, N. Y., and Military annals of Ticonderoga and Crown Point, etc.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
on commission; most of it was for farmers living in Western Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown left here in 1850 or 1851, and removed with his family to North Elba, Essex County, New York. This person says Gerritt Smith gave him a large tract of land there. He says he knows it because he saw the deed. ... Mir. Brown's integrity was never t old gentleman. He was, however, notably resolute in all that he did. Chapter 5: North Elba. John Brown and his family removed to North Elba, in Essex County, New York, in 1849. It was about this time that Mr. Gerritt Smith, the eminent philanthropist, offered to colored settlers his wild lands in that district of the An starting for Kansas, he again moved his household to North Elba, where they still reside, and where his body lies buried. At the Agricultural Fair of Essex County, for 1850, a great sensation was created by the unlooked — for appearance on the grounds of a beautiful herd of Devon cattle. They were the first that had bee
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Perkins and Brown, wool Factors. (search)
called upon a man who was his bookkeeper when he lived here. This person informs me that he came here from Akron, Ohio, in the spring of 1846, and engaged in the business of wool-dealing. He was afterwards associated in business with a Mr. Perkins, of Ohio. and their firm was Perkins and Brown. They sold large quantities of wool on commission; most of it was for farmers living in Western Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown left here in 1850 or 1851, and removed with his family to North Elba, Essex County, New York. This person says Gerritt Smith gave him a large tract of land there. He says he knows it because he saw the deed. ... Mir. Brown's integrity was never doubted, and he was honorable in all his dealings, but peculiar in many of his notions, and adhering to them with great obstinacy. Mr. Brown was a quiet and peaceable citizen, and a religious man. Rev. Mr. Conklin, who was settled here in the North Congregational Church, and who separated himself in a great measure from other mini
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
Chapter 5: North Elba. John Brown and his family removed to North Elba, in Essex County, New York, in 1849. It was about this time that Mr. Gerritt Smith, the eminent philanthropist, offered to colored settlers his wild lands in that district of the Adirondack wilderness. Many of them accepted the offer, and went there to make the experiment. At this period, writes a friend, John Brown appeared one day at Peterboroa, and said to Mr. Smith: I see, by the newspapers, that you have offer, where he managed Mr. Perkins's farm, and carried on the wool business. In 1855, on starting for Kansas, he again moved his household to North Elba, where they still reside, and where his body lies buried. At the Agricultural Fair of Essex County, for 1850, a great sensation was created by the unlooked — for appearance on the grounds of a beautiful herd of Devon cattle. They were the first that had been exhibited at the county festival, and every one was surprised and delighted at the
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
also two daughters-in-law, whose husbands have both fallen near me here. There is also another widow, Mrs. Thompson, whose husband fell here. Whether she is a mother or not I cannot say. All these, my wife included, live at North Elba, Essex County, New York. I have a middle-aged son, who has been, in some degree, a cripple from his childhood, who would have as much as he could well do to earn a living. He was a most dreadful sufferer in Kansas, and lost all he had laid up. He has not enougell as my own sorrow-stricken daughter, are left very poor, and have much greater need of sympathy than I, who, through Infinite Grace and the kindness of strangers, am joyful in all my tribulations. Dear sister, write them at North Elba, Essex Co., N. Y., to comfort their sad hearts. Direct to Mary A. Brown, wife of John Brown. There is also another, a widow, wife of Thompson, who fell with my poor boys in the affair at Harper's Ferry, at the same place. I do not feel conscious of guilt
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
Chapter 6: Essex County. This county is bounded north-west by Rockingham County, New Hampshire; south-west by Middlesex County, south by Suffolk County, east and north-east by the Atlantic Ocean, and south-east by Massachusetts Bay. Essex County is one of the most historical in the State, and the birthplace of many wise and great men. It has an extensive sea-coast, indented with numerous bays, inlets, and harbors; it has many delightful farms and beautiful ponds; it is to Eastern Massachusetts what Berkshire County is to Western Massachusetts,—a place of pleasant resort in the warm months of summer, to those who love the sea more than they do the valleys and the mountains. In former years the chief interests of Essex County were foreign commerce and the fisheries. At the present day, although the fishing interest holds its place, the foreign commerce of the county has in a great measure been transferred to Boston and New York. It is now largely devoted to manufactures. At
1 2 3