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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
n of powder intended to wreck the fort. Since 1890 Mr. Jordan has resided at Greenville, where he is secretary and treasurer of the South Carolina mutual insurance company. He was married, in 1871, to Frances Warthen Latimer, and they have two daughters living: Isabell, wife of William C. Schwalmeyer, of Memphis, Tenn., and Lalla Parker Jordan. Edmund Noah Joyner, a gallant Confederate veteran who is now prominent in the work of the Protestant Episcopal church, was born in Rockingham county, North Carolina, in 1847, and was reared and educated in Pitt county of that State. His father was Dr. Noah Joyner, born in Pitt county in 1816, who served as volunteer surgeon when occasion permitted, in the hospitals at Raleigh and Goldsboro during the war; his grandfather, John Joyner, was a member of the North Carolina legislature for many years; and his maternal grandfather, Dr. Robert Williams, served as a surgeon in the war of the Revolution from 1775, and afterward was a member of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Valuable war relic. (search)
, N. C. James T. Deans, Hertford county, N. C. John R. Dwiggins, Guilford county, N. C. Umphrey Elliott, Hertford county, N. C. James L. Freeman, Rockingham county, N. C. Peter Franklin, Madison county, N. C. John W. Goodwin, Hertford county, N. C. John Gosnal, Madison county, N. C. Ambrose Hoke, Iredell county, Ntford, N. C. John W. Kellough, Mecklenburg county, N. C. Commodore P. Long, Richmond county, N. C. Isaac L. Lezigia, Richmond, Va. John W. Long, Sr., Rockingham county, N. C. John W. Long, Jr., Rockingham county, N. C. Daniel Lassiter, Wilmington, N. C. Richmond T. Long, Richmond county, N. C. Barney Landers, MarshalRockingham county, N. C. Daniel Lassiter, Wilmington, N. C. Richmond T. Long, Richmond county, N. C. Barney Landers, Marshall county, N. C. John A. McCaskill, Wilmington, N. C. James McNeall, Richmond county, N. C. Neill McKennon, Wilmington, N. C. Peter McMillan, Richmond, Va. Duncan B. McDonald, Wilmington, N. C. Neill McLauchlin, New Hanover county, N. C. This makes in all seventy-six men rank and file.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
p near Raleigh in July, 1861, by the election of the following field officers: Colonel, J. Johnston Pettigrew, of Tyrrell county, then a resident of Charleston, S. C. Colonel Pettigrew had seen service with the forces in South Carolina, and commanded a regiment at the siege and capture of Fort Sumter by the Confederates in April, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel, John O. Long, of Randolph county, a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point; Major, Thomas S. Gallaway, Jr., of Rockingham county, a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, Va. The commissions of the field officers all bore date of July 11th, 1861. The regiment was composed originally of twelve companies, but two of them, C and D, were very soon transferred to other commands, and the lettering, A, B, E, F, G, H, I, K, L, and M, for the ten companies was retained. This fact is mentioned because the lettering of the companies of this regiment, as reported in the register published by the Adjut
The Daily Dispatch: December 6, 1861., [Electronic resource], Burning of St. Paul's Catholic Church in Philadelphia. (search)
earest and most practicable route, and we fear not his decision. Rockingham. Rockingham, Nov. 30, 1861 Railroad meeting In connection with the above subject, we append the following proceedings of a meeting of the citizens of Rockingham county, N. C.: At a large and enthusiastic meeting of citizens of the county of Rockingham, North Carolina, convened at Reidsville, on the 28th of November, 1861, on motion, Alfred Reed, Esq, was called to the chair, and James Irvin and Joseph HoRockingham, North Carolina, convened at Reidsville, on the 28th of November, 1861, on motion, Alfred Reed, Esq, was called to the chair, and James Irvin and Joseph Holderby were requested to act as secretaries; when, by request, Colonel J. H. Dillard explained the object of the meeting; and, before taking his seat, showed in his usual felicitous style the importance and great necessity of a connexion between the Richmond and Danville and the North Carolina Central Roads both in a commercial and military point of view. When he concluded, Dr. S. W. Keen was called for, who responded in a few pertinent and well- timed remarks, saying that he had nothing to
Habeas Corpus. --An important case has been decided by Chief Justice Person. In July, 1862 John N. Irvin, of Rockingham county, N. C. hired a substitute one Gadhart, who was 36 years of age, and consequently not then liable as a conscript.--He was accepted by Col. Madett and Irvin received an absolute discharge. After the passage of the law subjecting men between 35 and 45 to conscription. It was contended that Godhart was himself liable, and that, therefore, Irvin's discharge had no further effect. The Chief Justice decided that this was not the law, but that Irvin, having been absolutely discharged, was no longer liable to conscription. He says it would be different where a youth under 18 was hired since it was known to the partier when he was hired that he would be liable on arriving at 18. The consideration then faits, and the officer has no right to grant a longer discharge.
The Daily Dispatch: August 17, 1863., [Electronic resource], Convention of North Carolina brigades in Gen. Lee's army — a Rebuke Administered to Unpatriotic citizens at home. (search)
North Carolina coal. --We have seen a specimen of anthracite coal, discovered on the farm of a Mr. Wade, in Rockingham county, North Carolina. The coal appears to be very good, and has been so proven, we understand, by the proper test. The vein now worked is only six feet under ground, and is three feet thick. Col. B. M. Jones is engaged in the operation of mining this coal, and the work is progressing under the superintendence of Mr. Ambrose Barrett, a practical miner. The Upper Dan River Valley, in which the above mine is located, has been known for some years to contain a coal basin of considerable extent, and it was considered that anthracite coal was the predominant deposit. Should this impression prove to be as correct in other openings as it has in the mine of Wade's farm, the coal field of this region will be of very great value to the Confederacy.
Wanted --Twenty good negro Colliers, to work in our mines on Dan river, thirty miles west of Danville, in Rockingham county, N. C. Our shaft is a new one, not yet 100 feet deep, and is free from gas. The locality is healthy, and as safe as any in the Confederacy. Owners of such hands would do well to apply to us in person, or by letter to Danville. Jones & Neal. de 15--t1Jan
The Daily Dispatch: December 29, 1863., [Electronic resource], No Conference to be with Beast Butler on the Exchange question. (search)
Wanted --Twenty good negro Clliers, to work in our mines on Dan river, thirty miles west of Danville, in Rockingham county, N. C. Our haft is a new one, not yet 100 feet deep, and is free from gas. The locality is healthy, and as as any in the Confederacy. Owners of each hands would do well to apply to us in person, or by letter to Denville. Jones & Neal. de 15--