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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 106 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
ated a large body of the Comanches, and he killed two of their noted chieftains in a hand-to-hand fight. For this he was voted a handsome sword by the legislature of South Carolina. In 1860 he was married to a sister of Gen. M. W. Gary, of Abbeville county. He resigned from the old army in February, 1861, being then stationed in Texas, and taking farewell of his colonel, Robert E. Lee, proceeded to Montgomery, and was commissioned major of cavalry, C. S. A. Being assigned to duty as adjutant-on, and devoted himself to the profession of civil engineering. In 1898 he offered his services for the war with Spain. Brigadier-General Martin Witherspoon Gary Brigadier-General Martin Witherspoon Gary was born in 1831 at Cokesbury, Abbeville county, the third son of Dr. Thomas Reeder Gary. He was educated at the South Carolina college and Harvard college, graduating at the latter institution in 1854. Then studying law he was admitted to the bar in 1855, and soon acquired distinction
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
il 1890, when he was elected treasurer of Abbeville county. This office he still holds, having been eldest son of the foregoing, was born in Abbeville county, October 24, 1857, and completed his educer C. Haskell was born in what is now Abbeville county, S. C., September 22, 1839, the fifth child the Confederate veterans. He was born in Abbeville county, July 4, 1849. He located in Seneca in 1er Lyon J. Fuller Lyon was born in Abbeville county, S. C., in 1842, the son of William and Virgelected judge of the probate court of Abbeville county, S. C. This position he held for eighteen yelina, September 17, 1844, in that part of Abbeville county which is now called Greenwood county. Hid for college at the Bethlehem academy of Abbeville county, but the coming on of the war deprived hiin an hour. After the war he returned to Abbeville county, where he engaged in farming. Before the county of Abbeville was divided he served two years as a member of the board of county commissione[46 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
t saw the light in May, 1789. At that time, the foremost minds of America were studying constitutional questions, and the underlying principles of government. No wonder that this bright young Carolina lawyer should have become interested in affairs of State, formed a definite line of politics and settled for himself the question whether he would assume the role of demagogue or plant himself upon the high plane of statesmanship. He was fortunate too in the place of his birth. Abbeville county, South Carolina, was the home of his nativity and the place of his childhood. It was and is a county prolific of great men. She can rightly claim as her children, either by birth or adoption, John C. Calhoun, George McDuffie, Judge Cheves, Dr. Geddings, Judge James Calhoun, George and Aleck Bowie, Dr. John T. Pressly, the two Wardlaws, and many others whom I might mention. Genius thrives best when it finds kindred spirits around it. If I wanted an illustration of this fact, I would cite Bosto
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
tant; T. B. Lee, sergeant-major; Company A, J. W. Livingston, captain; Company B, James M. Perrin, captain; Company C, J. J. Norton, captain; Company D, F. E. Harrison, captain; Company E, Miles M. Norton, captain; Company F, Robert A. Hawthorn, captain; Company G; G. McD. Miller, captain; Company H, George M. Fairlee, captain; Company K, G. W. Cox, captain; Company L, J. B. Moore, captain. The regiment was composed of the ten companies of one hundred men each—Companies B and G from Abbeville county; Companies A, C, E, F, Pickens county; Companies D, K and L, Anderson county; Company H, Marion county. On July 20th the regiment was mustered into Confederate service for three years, or during the war, being the first, I believe, to enlist for the war. Few, if any, thought that the war would continue for three years. The general impression was that six to twelve months would end the war and secure our independence. Some of us were afraid it would all be over before we reached the fr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
Hot night fight at Stony Creek. From the News leader, May 6, 1908. Virginian guided a flank attack at Farm he was born On—Movement which broke Wilson's great Raid. Working through a swamp in the dark with talk of Dominecker which was found to be unfounded. Captain W. R. Brooks, of the Hampton Legion, now a resident of Abbeville county, S. C., is publishing a series of extracts from his forthcoming book on scout services with Hampton in the Civil War. In one of these articles, recently published he tells a story of special interest to people in this part of Virginia. After describing the return from the fight with Sheridan at Trevillian's, and General M. C. Butler's interview with General R. E. Lee in the latter's tent at Petersburg, he says: We moved in a column of fours through the city of Petersburg and after clearing the city struck out in a southerly direction, skirting the Petersburg and Weldon railroad. After getting out about seven miles we halted for the
Sudden Deaths. --On Saturday evening last Mr. John Bradley, an aged and much-respected citizen of Abbeville county, S. C., dropped dead while in the act of shaving. The sister of the deceased was immediately sent for, who, on reaching the room of her brother, fainted, and died in a few moments.