hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 5 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Charleston. (search)
hough we are far from having got a Conservative Government yet in Columbia, we have secured a White majority in the Senate, and a powerful White minority in the Lower House. In Charleston county, though the Negroes count two to one, we have conquered by our new tactics half the seats. How is the conquest made? By sense and science; by the White man's power of putting this and that together. In certain counties we are too weak to fight. What is the use of running seven men in Beaufort County, where the Negroes stand at six to one, or three in Georgetown County, where they stand at seven to one? Why try for eighteen seats in Charleston County, seeing that the Negro voters stand at three to one? Till we can seize Fort Sumter and the Citadel, we cannot change these voting lists. Then why not try a compromise? That is the question we asked each other. Yes; and the reply. Some said it was no use to try; others believed there was a chance. You see the Negroes have th
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
1898; Frances and Amelia Pride. Ernest A. Bell, born in Beaufort county, S. C., December 16, 1842, belonged to a zealous Confederate familConfederate army. Theodore A. Bell, the father, was born in Beaufort county, S. C., and was a merchant until his State called her sons to armsng the early part of the present century, and settled first in Beaufort county and afterward in Barnwell county, where his father, Dr. Lewis nn., August 14, 1837. His father, John G. Humbert, born in Beaufort county, S. C., in 1800, was a Methodist minister and planter. In 1834 h1866. Captain Humbert's grandfather, David, was a native of Beaufort county, S. C., and son of Melchior Humbert, whose father, Peter Humbert, ative of Genoa, Italy. The latter obtained a grant of land in Beaufort county from the English government in 1738 and came to America that yprivate in the same company. Benjamin F. Wyman was born in Beaufort county, S. C., in 1839, and was educated at the State university at Wilmi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fragments of war history relating to the coast defence of South Carolina, 1861-‘65, and the hasty preparations for the Battle of Honey Hill, November 30, 1864. (search)
L. Campbell, captain; Saxby Chaplin, first lieutenant; C. G. Henderson, second lieutenant; Stobo Perry, third lieutenant; (from Colleton county), 51 men — was at John's Island, near Charleston; ordered to Pocataligo to relieve Company K, ordered to Georgia; it arrived at Honey Hill November 30, 8 o'clock A. M. Company C—James M. Gregorie, captain; Jos. M. Farr, first lieutenant (commanding); T. Heyward Howard, second lieutenant (on other duty); Wm. N. Heyward, third lieutenant; (from Beaufort county), 20 men. A detachment on outpost duty in the vicinity, which assembled and reported for duty—Company E, H. C. Raysor, captain; J. P. Youmans, first lieutenant; H. W. Jaudon, second lieutenant; Isaac Bostick, third lieutenant; (from what is now Hampton county), 80 men—were at Pocataligo and ordered to Bee's Creek on 29th; went there promptly; advanced towards Boyd's until enemy was in sight and remained there until evening, actively skirmishing with head of naval brigade, which had adv
Destructive hail storm --The Washington (N. C.) Dispatch, of the 30th ult., says that a most disastrous hail storm occurred in that section on the night of the 26th, which seemed to sweep in a regular current, carrying desolation in its train. At Long Acre and Bath Creek Districts, in Beaufort county, corn and other crops were wholly destroyed. Many of the stones found next morning were as large as a man's fist.