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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
d with the more cautious Buell at that place, on the moving of the army southward at the close of March, March 28, 1862. his own judgment was his guide, and his was practi cally an independent command. Before him the insurgents had destroyed the bridges, and these he was compelled to rebuild for the passage of his troops and munitions of war. This work was done so promptly, that his army was seldom even halted in waiting. On the 4th of April he was at Shelbyville, the capital of Bedford County, Tennessee, at the terminus of a short railway branching from that which connects Nashville with Chattanooga. This was almost sixty miles from Nashville, and there he made his deposit of supplies. At that point he struck across the country with a supply-train, sufficient for only two days provisions, in the direction of Huntsville, making forced marches all the way. On the 10th April, 1862. he left Fayetteville, in Lincoln County, Tennessee, crossed the State line the same day, and entered
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forrest, Nathan Bedford 1821-1877 (search)
Forrest, Nathan Bedford 1821-1877 Military officer; born in Bedford county, Tenn., July 13, 1821; joined the Tennessee Mounted Rifles in June, 1861; and, in July following, raised and equipped a regiment of cavalry. By 1863 he had become a famous Confederate chief; and early in 1864 the sphere of his duties was enlarged, and their importance increased. He was acknowledged to be the most skilful and daring Confederate leader in the West. He made an extensive raid in Tennessee and Kentucky, with about 5,000 mounted men, in March and April, 1864. He had been skirmishing with Gen. W. S. Smith in northern Mississippi, and, sweeping rapidly across the Tennessee Nathan Bedford Forrest. River into western Tennessee, rested a while at Jackson, and then (March 23) pushed on towards Kentucky. A part of his force captured Union City the next day, with the National garrison of 450 men. Forrest then pushed on to Paducah, on the Ohio River, with 3,000 men, and demanded the surrender of F
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
iano. War means killing, he said, and the way to kill is to get there first with the most men. He was not taught at West Point, but he gave lessons to West Point. His career was quite as brilliant and devoted in its allegiance to duty in peace as it was in the conflict of arms. His father's family had moved from Virginia, before the Revolution, to North Carolina, where every member able to bear arms at that time fought in the cause of independence. His parents moved thence to Bedford county, Tennessee, where he was born July 13, 1821. In 1834 he moved with his father to Marshall county, Mississippi, where the latter soon died, leaving young Forrest to support the widow and family with nc resources other than a small hill farm. He undertook this work with such devotion and energy, that while neglecting his own education he provided liberally for that of his brothers and sisters, and going into business at Memphis became able to purchase a large plantation, and at the outbreak o