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Francis Glass, Washingtonii Vita (ed. J.N. Reynolds) 2 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Francis Glass, Washingtonii Vita (ed. J.N. Reynolds), EDITOR'S PREFACE. (search)
a way, that I feel bound to give the reader the whole history of it. In the summer of 1823, I was a member of the Ohio University, and left that Institution, expecting to return to college to pursue my studies, in the winter; but circumstances, unnecessary for me to state, prevented me from joining my class at that time, and I was induced to seek, in the western part of the state, a person with whom I could prosecute my studies during the winter season. I heard of a competent teacher in Warren county, of which Lebanon is the shire, situate about thirty miles from Cincinnati. He had excited no small degree of interest among the few who were capable of appreciating his extraordinary attainments in classical literature. — This man was Francis Glass, the author of the following work, "The Life of Washington." I found him in a remote part of the county, in a good neighborhood of thrifty farmers, who had employed him to instruct their children, who, in general, were then acquiring the sim
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Autobiographical sketch. (search)
s, yet, when war ensued, I felt it to be my duty to sustain the government in that war and to enter the military service if a fitting opportunity offered. When the regiment of volunteers from Virginia was called for by the President, I received from the Governor and Council of State the appointment as Major in that regiment, and was mustered into service on the 7th of January, 1847. Colonel John F. Hamtramck, of the County of Jefferson, and Lieutenant Colonel Thomas B. Randolph, of the County of Warren, were the other field officers. The regiment was ordered to rendezvous at Fortress Monroe and the superintendence of the drilling there and the embarkation for Mexico were entrusted to me. Two extra companies were allowed to the regiment, and, on account of some delay in the organization of them, I did not sail from Fortress Monroe with the last detachment of these companies until March 1st, arriving at Brazos Santiago on the 17th, to learn, for the first time, the news of General Tayl
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
the north of the Tennessee River, and the latter south of it. Bragg moved with the greatest celerity, and won the race, and with full forty thousand men he turned his face toward the Ohio. His force was divided into three corps, commanded respectively by W. J. Hardee, Leonidas Polk, and E. Kirby Smith. The latter was sent to Knoxville, and the former two held Chattanooga and its vicinity. Buell disposed his army in a line stretching from Huntsville, in Alabama, to McMinnsville, in Warren County, Tennessee. His headquarters, late in August, were at Huntsville, and General Thomas commanded the left wing at McMinnsville. E. Kirby Smith. So lay the opposing armies when E. Kirby Smith left Knoxville, and passing through Big Creek Gap of the Cumberland Mountains, with about six thousand men and a train of one hundred and fifty wagons, penetrated Kentucky by way of Knox County. By this movement he so completely outflanked and imperiled General G. W. Morgan, at Cumberland Gap, Se
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McMinnsville, battle near (search)
ell marched in nearly parallel lines eastward towards Chattanooga—the latter north of the Tennessee River, and the former south of it. Bragg won the race, and with fully 40,000 men turned his face towards the Ohio. Bragg divided his force into three corps, commanded respectively by Generals Hardee, Polk, and E. Kirby Smith. The latter was sent to Knoxville, Tenn., while the two former held Chattanooga and its vicinity. Buell disposed his line from Huntsville, Ala., to McMinnsville, Warren co., Tenn. So lay the opposing armies when Kirby Smith left Knoxville to invade Kentucky. Bragg crossed the Tennessee, just above Chattanooga, on Aug. 21, with thirty-six regiments of infantry, five of cavalry, and forty guns. Louisville was his destination. He advanced among the rugged mountains towards Buell's left at McMinnsville as a feint, but fairly flanked the Nationals. This was a cavalry movement, which resulted in a battle there. The horsemen were led by General Forrest, who, for s
great Manchester (England) house states that they will supply "elastic steel shirt collars, wristbands, and fronts, enamelled white." A New Business for Memphis--The Memphis Appeal says that that city is supplying manufactured tobacco to portions of Kentucky, and down the river as far as Natchez Samuel H. Coleman, a member of Captain Imboden's Artillery company, was badly injured by an accidental explosion of gunpowder, at Winchester, on the 28th ult. Z. M. P. Maury, of Warren county, Tenn., has been elected Brigadier General of the 10th Brigade Tennessee militia. Anderson, the fugitive slave, whose case created some excitement in Canada, has arrived in England. The comet has been plainly visible to the naked eye in Tennessee and other portions of the South. Private Bostwick, of the Gulf City Guards, died in Norfolk on Wednesday last, of typhoid fever. Col. Biddle, Democratic Union candidate, has been elected to Congress in the Second Congressional Di