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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., General Pegram on the night before his death. (search)
was the question; but he finally decided to approach, and did so. Then the mystery was quickly solved. The men in blue were a battalion of Confederate marines, and they were proceeding toward the Nottoway river to make a circuit, approach James river far below City Point, board and seize upon a Federal ram, and then steam up the James, and destroy Grant's fleet of transports at City Point. This excellent scheme was thoroughly arranged; the torpedoes to be used were hidden in the woods of Nottoway ready for the party, when a deserter went over and informed the enemy, in consequence of which the expedition was abandoned. We have seen how, by a singular chance, the battalion set out on its march, armed and prepared, the very day that the enemy's cavalry crossed the Rowanty. More singular still, they passed along in rear of the Federal cavalry without discovering them or being discovered. This, all things considered, was one of the most curious events of the war; as the scheme pro
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 29 (search)
ville; that Lee was in person at Amelia Court-house, etc. This news was given to the passing troops, and lusty cheers went up from every throat. They had marched about fifteen miles already that day, and now struck out as if they were good for fifteen more, and vowed that they were going to beat the record of the cavalry. We continued to move along the wagon-road which runs parallel to the South Side Railroad till nearly dark, and had by that time reached a point about half-way between Nottoway and Burkeville. The road was skirted by a dense woods on the north side — the side toward the enemy. A commotion suddenly arose among the headquarters escort, and on looking round, I saw some of our men dashing up to a horseman in full Confederate uniform, who had emerged like an apparition from the woods, and in the act of seizing him as a prisoner. I recognized him at once as the scout who had brought the important despatch sent by Sheridan from Columbia to City Point. I said to him,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
Lee's advance toward Burkeville, that Lee was in person at Amelia Court House, etc. This news was given to the passing troops, and lusty cheers went up from every throat. They had marched about fifteen miles already that day, and now struck out as if they were good for fifteen more, and swore they were going to beat the record of the cavalry. We continued to move along the road which runs parallel to the South Side railroad till nearly dark, and had reached a point about half-way between Nottoway and Burkeville. The road was skirted by a dense woods on the north side, the side toward the enemy. There was a sudden commotion among the headquarters escort, and on looking around I saw some of our men dashing up to a horseman in full rebel uniform, who had suddenly appeared in the road, and they were in the act of seizing him as a prisoner. I recognized him at once as one of Sheridan's scouts, who had before brought us important dispatches; said to him: How do you do, Campbell? and t
e island. I hope to get off to-morrow night, and will move at once upon New Berne; but I am not sure of it, as we cannot calculate upon more than one good day in the week. But we are getting used to storms, so that we don't mind them. How we have escaped with so little loss of life is to me a miracle. I feel thankful enough. During our delay here I came very near moving upon [illegible], making my headquarters there, and rushing some columns up to burn the bridges on the Black Water, Nottoway, and Menheim, and then rush with my entire force upon Weldon and Gaston. But it is a risky move with my small force, and your orders are to go to New Berne. The same move can be made after we get New Berne (if we succeed), if you will send me men enough — say double the force. I feel sure that I can cut the enemy's communications at Weldon and Gaston with an additional force of even two regiments. In case you decide to send them you must not hesitate to send any division you like, as I
brigades have passed here to-day, and been forwarded; he himself will arrive to-night, and follow immediately. The water here has improved my health. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Weldon, N. C., May 8th, 1864. Genl. Braxton Bragg, Richmond, Va.: Despatch received at 10.30 A. M. Orders had been given before destruction of bridge at Stony Creek to have necessary timbers prepared for all bridges between here and Petersburg. After destroying Stony Bridge enemy's cavalry engaged guards at Nottoway and Jarratt's, but were repulsed. All troops are being hurried forward as rapidly as possible. I hope to leave to-day for Petersburg, where prompt and energetic measures will be adopted as soon as practicable. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Petersburg, May 10th, 1864. Genl. Braxton Bragg, Richmond, Va.: Have just arrived. Will take the offensive as soon as practicable. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Petersburg, May 10th, 1864. Genl. Braxton Bragg, Richmond, Va.: General Hoke has
wives and daughters are daily and hourly nursing our sick and wounded, they wipe the hot brow, cool the fevered lips, and tenderly nourish and comfort the suffering soldiers in their hospitals. The angel nurses and the stricken patriots of this patriotic place shall not fall into the hands of ruffian invaders. Its very militia has set an example which inspires the confidence that Petersburg is indomitable, and which consoles and compensates for every drop of blood which has been spilt at Nottoway, at Walthal Junction, and at Drury's Bluff, and Howlett's Neck, for the defence of the old Cockade City. Let the reserves and second class of militia of the surrounding counties now come in promptly, one and all, and emulate this bright and successful example — let it hotly hiss to blood-red shame the laggards and skulkers from the streets and alleys of the city to the lines; and let it proclaim aloud that Petersburg is to be and shall be defended on her outer walls, on her inner lines, at
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 12 (search)
erable service to the Confederates, who were able to use it up to within a few miles of the Union position, and from the point of stoppage supplies were hauled by wagon. Warren's expedition was to completely break up this line for a distance of twenty-five miles southward. The force consisted of the Fifth Corps, Mott's division of the Second Corps, and Gregg's mounted division. Setting out on the 7th of December, with four days rations, the troops moved southward, and that night reached Nottoway. The railroad-bridge over this stream was destroyed by General Gregg. Next day the march was renewed to Jewett's Station, to which point the railroad-track was torn up from the Nottoway. The work of destruction was resumed early on the morning of the 9th, by forming line of battle on the railroad, each division destroying all on its front, and then moving to the left alternately. A force of the enemy was encountered, but was driven by Gregg across the Meherrin River. At Hicksford, on t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The lost sword of Gen. Richard B. Garnett, who fell at Gettysburg, (from the Baltimore sun, of November 4, and December 3, 1905.) (search)
the Federals and Confederates being first separated. One deep trench was about 20 feet long, 12 feet wide and 20 feet deep, and it was filled. I was enabled to keep up with our army, retreating to Virginia, and finally reached my home in Nottoway county, Va., about August 15th, which occasioned some surprise and rejoicing, as I had been reported dead. Marylanders with Garnett. At Gettysburg our company was just 100 strong—a fine body of men and officers. We had a number of recruits and brave Capt. Camphell was killed at Five Forks, Va., April 1st, 1865. The adjutant of our regiment, Hugh McCullough, of Maryland, was always conspicuously brave and capable. My company G of the 18th Virginia Infantry, was raised in Nottoway county, Va., and started out 100 strong, but only 28 surrendered at Appomattox, and of these only 3 men among the original 100. During the four years war 473 names appeared on the company roll, and these are inscribed on the Confederate monument erec
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
as one of the thoughtful leaders and prolific writers of Virginia in her palmiest days, you are yet sufficiently alert and watchful to advise the good old county of Halifax to preserve sacredly these fortifications, which will be a priceless heirloom for her sons and their posterity for all time, and an inspiration to guard and defend with their lives, if necessary, as did those brave men in June, 1864, the soil of Halifax from invasion; and Charlotte, Mecklenburg, Pittsylvania, Lunenburg, Nottoway and Amelia can well afford to lend a helping hand for this worthy purpose, as they each and all furnished men who did their part nobly in that battle; the momentous results from which were the saving of the most important bridge from Danville to Richmond, and from absolute destruction all the rolling stock of the Danville Railroad, which had been run just beyond my command, and also the saving not only of the road itself from Staunton River to Danville, but probably Danville, with its vast
The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1860., [Electronic resource], English view of the late Royal visit. (search)
Union Electoral Ticket.State of Virginia.the Union, the Constitution, and the Enforcementof the Laws.for President,John Bell, of Tranesserfor Vice-President,Edward Everett, of Massachusetts. Electors: Dist. 1st. L. H. Chandler, of Norfolk City. Dist. 2d. Travis H. Epes, of Nottoway. p>Dist. 3d. Thos. Bruck, of Halifax. Dist. 4th. John T. Thornton of P. Edward. Dist. 5th. Jas. F. Johnson, of Bedford. Dist. 6th. Marmaduke Johnson, of Richmond City. Dist. 7th. Lemuel. J. Bowden, of Winburg. Dist. 8th. Joseph Christian, of Middlesex. Dist. 9th. B. H. Shackelford, of Fauquier. Dist. 10th. And W. E. Kennedy, of Jefferson. Dist. 11th. Francis T. Anderson, of Rockbridge. Dist. 12th. W. R. Staples, of Montgomery. Dist. 13th. Walter Preston, of Washing'n. Dist. 14th. J. J. Jackson. Jr., of Wood. Dist. 15th. A. B. Caldwell, of Ohio. Election, Tuesday,6th November. oc 31--4t
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