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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 4 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 10 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 6 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Orange County (Virginia, United States) or search for Orange County (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
his recollection of the engagement, brought me a reply under date of February 26th, 1892, from which I take the following extracts: I cannot recall much of the route along which we passed except that we moved in a northeasterly direction, somewhat; nor can I recall the place at which we bivouacked on the night of the 4th. On the night of the 5th, however, we bivouacked near a place called Vidiersville. In the meantime, reports reached us that fighting was going on in that part of Orange county known as the Wilderness, and from the early start taken on the morning of the 6th and the rapidity of the march, it became evident that the Wilderness was our destination. After reaching the plank-road, which was about 9 o'clock A. M., we were hurried along to the scene of action. By 10 o'clock or a little after, on the 6th, we were on the ground, but we had no sooner arrived than we filed to the right from the plank-road, moving quite rapidly in a direction apparently at right angle
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
save Virginia. And as soon as the secession of his State became a fixed fact he resigned his commission in the army, and bidding farewell to old friends and comrades, reported to duty to Governor Letcher, and was commissioned colonel of Virginia volunteers. Colonel Hill was at once ordered to report to General Joseph E. Johnston, then in command of the troops on the upper Potomac, and was assigned to the command of the Thirteenth Virginia Infantry, made up of companies from the counties of Orange, Culpeper, Louisa, Hampshire, and Frederick, in Virginia, and one company from Baltimore, Maryland. This regiment was composed of splendid material, and by his training and discipline and from the spirit he infused into its officers and men, it was made equal to the best of the regular troops, and became as well known throughout the Army of Northern Virginia as its first loved commander. Of this regiment General Lee said: It is a splendid body of men. General Ewell said: It is the only