Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Greenbrier (West Virginia, United States) or search for Greenbrier (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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n immediate recognition. Every town was illuminated, and the people everywhere rejoicing over the downfall of Vicksburgh. Crops of wheat and oats are very good, but corn very poor indeed. After leaving the Ohio at Belleville, on the night of the nineteenth, we marched to near Elizabethtown, in Wirt County, from there to Steer Creek, and across the mountains to Sutton; from Sutton on the Gauley Bridge road to Birch Creek, crossing Gauley at mouth of Cranberry, and thence into the Greenbrier County, crossing Cold Mountain, passing over a heavy blockaded road, tired steeds preventing rapid marches, and six days were consumed ere we reached Lewisburgh, near which we left Colonel Grigsby, with a detachment, which then numbered about four hundred and seventy-five men. From the crossing of the Ohio to our entrance into Greenbrier, our men lived on beef alone, without salt, and no bread. Yet their only wish seemed to be for the safety of General Morgan and the command. To the kind
Doc. 157.-battle at White Sulphur Springs, Virginia. Report of General Averill. Huttonsville, Va., Aug. 30, 1863. General: I have the honor to report the safe return of my command to this place, after an expedition through the counties of Hardy, Pendleton, Highland, Bath, Greenbrier, and Pocahontas. We drove General Jackson out of Pocahontas and over the Warm Spring Mountain, in a series of skirmishes, destroyed their saltpetre works, burned Camp Northwest and a large amount of arms, equipments, and stores. We fought a severe engagement with a superior force, under command of Major-General Sam Jones and Colonel Patten, at Rocky Gap, near the White Sulphur Springs. The battle lasted during two days. We drove the enemy from his first position, but want of ammunition, and the arrival, on the second day, of three regiments to reenforce the enemy, from the direction whence the cooperation of General Scammon had been promised, decided me to withdraw. My command was withdraw