Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) or search for Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ering three hundred men, under command of Major Zagonyi, charged against two thousand rebels, drawn up in line of battle at their camp, near Springfield, Missouri, routed them, cleared Springfield of rebels, and retired.--(Doc. 106.) At Pilot Knob, Missouri, Col. Boyd, of the Twenty-fourth Missouri regiment, commandant of the post, announced the modification of the proclamation of Gen. Fremont by the President, and declared that martial law would be rigidly enforced in the counties of Jefferson, St. Francois, Washington, and Ironton, and that all persons taken in arms against the Government of the United States, in an irregular warfare, or who might be found to have participated in any manner in the burning or otherwise injuring railroad or other bridges, or cutting telegraph wire, or injuring any public property, would be summarily shot. Also, that the sympathizers with the rebellion, who were constantly visiting the stations on the Iron Mountain Railroad, and giving informatio
rd passed through, the whole bridge was in flames. Two bridges on the East Tennessee and Georgia railroad on Lick Creek, Green County, and another on Holstein River, were also burned. The guard at Lick Creek were unarmed. They were overwhelmed, tied, and carried away and kept during the day. The bridge on Holstein River was not guarded. It was thought unnecessary to guard it, Sullivan County being strongly Southern in feeling. The bridge at Holstein River is at Strawberry Plains. In Jefferson County the bridge was fired, but the fire was put out by the people. The city of Savannah, Ga., was in a state of intense excitement. The news of the capture of the Walker battery on Hilton Head, and the arrival of retreating troops, among them many of the wounded, aroused the intensest feeling. Everybody was in the street, and large crowds collected around the news and telegraphic offices throughout the day until late at night. Families commenced packing up, and large numbers of fem
tanton.--The One Hundred and Twenty-second regiment N. Y.S. V. left Syracuse for the seat of war. It was commanded by Colonel Silas Titus.--Paris, Ky., was evacuated by the National troops, who fell back on Cynthiana. Great excitement existed in Louisville, Ky., in consequence of the approach of the rebel army under Gen. E. Kirby Smith. The Governor of the State issued a proclamation authorizing Col. Gibson to organize and bring into the field all the able-bodied men in the county of Jefferson and city of Louisville, and the Mayor called upon the citizens to come forward and enroll themselves for the immediate defence of their city. The public archives were removed from Frankfort to Louisville, and the Legislature adjourned to the same place. Lexington, Ky., was entered and occupied by the rebel forces under Gen. E. Kirby Smith. The Union troops evacuated the place a few hours previous, and fell back to Covington.--Natchez, Miss., was shelled by the Union gunboats. Y
September 2. The following order was issued from the War Department at Washington: By direction of the President, Major-General McClellan will have command of the fortifications at Washington, and of all the troops for the defence of the capital. --Gen. Wright, commanding Department of the Ohio, issued an order from his headquarters at Louisville, Ky., proclaiming Jefferson County in that State, to be under martial law. The greatest excitement existed in the cities of Cincinnati, Ohio, Covington and Newport, Ky., in consequence of the reported approach of the rebel army under Gen. E. Kirby Smith. General Wallace assumed command, and issued a proclamation declaring those cities to be under martial law. All business was suspended. Saloons were closed and liquor of all kinds was forbidden to be sold. The ferry-boats were stopped. The inhabitants, including judges and clergymen, met in public places, formed themselves into companies, and began to drill in readiness for
May 16. Last night a company of United States cavalry was surprised and captured at Charlestown, Jefferson County, Va. Major-General Schenck, on being informed by telegraph of the disaster, immediately ordered General Milroy to send out a force to intercept and attack the rebels, and to-day he received the following despatch from General Milroy, announcing the result: The Federal cavalry captured at Charlestown were recaptured by detachments of Virginia and Pennsylvania cavalry, under Captain Vitt, this afternoon, about three o'clock, at Piedmont Station, in Fauquier County. We also captured forty rebels and a corresponding number of horses. Two rebels were killed. I regret to add that we lost Captain Vitt and one sergeant. Our cavalry recaptured one Federal lieutenant, and fifty privates, and their horses. Major Adams, of the First New York cavalry, who arrived after the recapture, is still in pursuit of the rebels. The Virginia and Pennsylvania cavalry, who made the rec
lle, Ky., was entered and plundered by a body of rebels under the command of Colonel Hamilton. Brig.-Gen. J. C. Sullivan, from his Headquarters at Harper's Ferry, Va., issued the following general orders: It appearing that the leaders of the rebellion against the Government of the United States have passed laws conscripting all males between certain ages, and have appointed agents to enforce such conscript laws; and such agents having made their appearance in the counties of Berkeley, Jefferson, Clarke, and Loudon, counties not occupied by or under the control of insurgent troops; and believing that a large portion of the citizens of these counties are anxious to remain at home, and to preserve their faith and allegiance to the Federal Government, and to receive the protection which is due them; and knowing that the poorer class of citizens of these counties have been hostile to the usurpation of the rebel authorities, and have been compelled by them to shoulder the musket, while