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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
e abandonment and destruction of that place, with all the railroads leading to it, and telegraphed me as follows: Centreville, Ga., October 10, 1864-noon. Lieutenant-General Grant: Dispatch about Wilson just received. Hood is now crossing Coosa River, twelve miles below Rome, bound west. If he passes over the Mobile and Ohio road, had I not better execute the plan of my letter sent by Colonel Porter, and leave General Thomas, with the troops now in Tennessee, to defend the State? He willput much more on the defensive than heretofore. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Kingston, Ga., October 11, 1864-a. m. Lieutenant-General Grant: Hood moved his army from Palmetto Station across by Dallas and Cedartown, and is now on the Coosa River, south of Rome. He threw one corps on my road at Acworth, and I was forced to follow. I hold Atlanta with the Twentieth Corps, and have strong detachments along my line. This reduces my active force to a comparatively small army. We cannot
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
ings, Cheney's Farm, Kolb's Farm, Olley's Creek, Nickajack Creek, Noyes' Creek, and other points. June 24, 1864.Action at La Fayette. July 4, 1864.Skirmishes at Ruff's Mill, Neal Dow Station, and Rottenwood Creek. July 5-17, 1864.Operations on the line of the Chattahoochee River, with skirmishes at Howell's, Turner's, and Pace's Ferries, Isham's Ford, and other points. July 10-22, 1864.Rousseau's raid from Decatur, Ala., to the West Point and Montgomery Railroad, with skirmishes near Coosa River (11th), near Greenpoint and at Ten Island Ford (14th), near Auburn and near Chehaw (18th). July 18, 1864.Skirmish at Buck Head. General John B. Hood, C. S. Army, supersedes General Joseph E. Johnston in command of the Army of Tennessee. July 19, 1864.Skirmishes on Peach Tree Creek. July 20, 1864.Battle of Peach Tree Creek. July 21, 1864.Engagement at Bald (or Leggett's) Hill. July 22, 1864.Battle of Atlanta. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
e corps through Dalton to Resaca, Ga. May 14, the Fifth Indiana, Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, were engaged; the Fifth Indiana was charged, and repulsed the enemy in the most gallant manner. May 15, the Sixth Ohio Light Battery, Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery; Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery; Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania and Fifth Indiana Batteries were engaged. May 16, the enemy having evacuated Resaca, the artillery crossed the Coosa River and marched with their divisions to Adairsville, when, on May 17, the Sixth Ohio Light Battery was placed in position near the Adairsville and Resaca road, and Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, was placed in position one mile to the right and front on General Wood's division front, each doing good execution. May 20, the Fifth Indiana Light Battery, Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, and the Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Battery were engaged with General Hardee's corps, C.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
ially successful. A few troops advanced into the works on De Soto Hill were sufficient to draw the enemy's artillery fire from the two formidable field-works, one situated on the east bank of the Oostenaula and the other on the south bank of the Coosa. The works were situated on two high hills, and completely commanded all approaches to them from the. opposite side of the river, as well as the works just abandoned by the enemy and now held by us. In order to test the full strength of the enemsion. The city was occupied by McCook's brigade until the advance was resumed. Morgan's and Mitchell's brigades went into camp on the west bank of the Oostenaula, occupying the works. The enemy's pickets continued to hold the south bank of the Coosa for several days, and kept up at intervals a vicious skirmish firing into the city, killing and wounding soldiers and citizens indiscriminately, until the 22d, when, in compliance with instructions, Morgan crossed a part of his brigade in pontoon
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 129 (search)
s skirmishers, drove the enemy's pickets across the Alabama road, and the rebel works were soon occupied by my command, the enemy having crossed the river, destroying the bridge. A battery of the enemy's, stationed on the opposite side of the Coosa River, having opened fire on my line, Captain Barnett's battery reported to me and was soon in a good position, and in a short time silenced that of the enemy. May 19, 20, and 21, remained on the north side of the Coosa River. May 22, Tenth IllinoiCoosa River. May 22, Tenth Illinois Infantry were ordered to descend the Oostenaula in pontoon boats to cross the Etowah and take possession of the south side of the Coosa, the enemy's pickets having become troublesome in this direction. This movement was promptly and handsomely executed by this excellent regiment. At 5 p. m. the pontoon bridge having been completed over the Etowah River, the balance of my command moved to the south side of the Coosa, remaining during the 23d. May 24, command moved at 5 a. m., and bivouacked
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 131 (search)
es of that city. On the 17th we continued our march, and at noon had arrived at Jones. Mill, where we halted until about 9 o'clock that night. Two companies were sent to the mill as a guard. At 9 p. m. we started again on the Rome road, and at 2 a. m. we halted about two miles from the city. The next day we moved up within sight of the town, where we remained until the 22d. That day we received orders to pack up and get ready to march. We crossed over into Rome, and then across the Coosa River on pontoons; two companies were given the job of clearing the way. They crossed on pontoons, and after deploying, marched, steadily up the hill, driving the rebels before them. The rest of the regiment then crossed and the pioneers commenced throwing the bridge across. On the 24th we left camp on the Coosa and took the main road leading to Atlanta, and camped that night, at Cave Spring. The next day we turned off and took the Dallasroad, and on the 26th arrived at the town of Dallas. T
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 134 (search)
e soon ascertained that these were deserted, and we moved to the top of the hill, where the enemy began shelling our line, while our skirmishers advanced to the Coosa River and found the enemy's skirmishers on the opposite side. The regiment moved, under cover of a hill, in a piece of woods, while our battery came up on the hill as of Forrest and Wheeler being about to attack our lines, which all proved false. May 20, at 2.30 p. m., being relieved from two days picketing, made camp near Coosa River, being one mile from Rome, which lay on the opposite bank. May 22, at 2.30 p. m. left camp and moved across the Oostenaula River on pontoon bridge into Rome and then across the Etowah River on pontoon-boats, and took position on a high, steep ridge on the south bank of the Coosa River. Distance marched, three miles. May 23, moved camp at 9 a. m. nearly a mile farther from town and made camp in a pine grove, and drew rations of hard bread, which was welcome, for we had been subsisting fo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 143 (search)
ly on the evening of the 14th wewithdrew to the rear, drew two days rations, and took up a position on the right of the front line, which we intrenched close up to the enemy's lines. During the night of the 15th the enemy retreated across the Coosa River. On the morning of the 16th we marched back to Sugar Valley for knapsacks and baggage, and drew two days additional rations, and at 2 p. m. took up the line of march for Rome, the expedition, consisting of the Second Division, Fourteenth Armyhundred and twenty-first rested on the north side of the river, where they were supplied with shoes and clothing and enabled to get plenty of vegetables to eat, until the 23d of May. On the evening of the 23d we moved to the south side of the Coosa River. On the morning of the 24th we took up the line of march for Dallas, Ga.; arrived at Cave Spring and camped for the night; Private Samuel Henry, Company G, was wounded by the premature discharge of his gun. Moved on the 25th and bivouacked ne
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 176 (search)
as ordered to move farther to the left and take up position, which I did under heavy fire of artillery and musketry, and was heavily engaged here all day. 16th, the enemy having evacuated the night before, I moved into Resaca and camped. 17th, moved forward again, passing through Calhoun, and camped at the battle-ground five miles below. 18th, moved forward, passing through Adairsville, and camped at a point five miles from Kingston. 19th, moved again to a position on the banks of the Coosa River. 20th, marched on toward Cassville and camped. 21st, crossed Etowah River at Island Ford, and camped on Euharlee Creek. 22d, remained in camp. 23d, remained in camp. 24th, crossed creek and camped on Allatoona Hills. 25th, marched at 2 a. m. toward Dallas, through Burnt Hickory, and camped on the mountain. 26th, moved forward and took up position in line on Pumpkin Vine Creek at 4 p. m., and threw up works during the night. 27th, engaged by rebel batteries all day. 28th, engaged in s
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 178 (search)
a flank fire of musketry, but the move was so unexpected that most of the men were under cover before the heaviest fire was opened. Sergeant Hoffman was severely wounded, and 2 horses shot in this operation. Lieutenants Repp and Pound came out with their sections and the battery moved with the division several miles to the right, and one section relieved two guns of some Iowa battery, and fired several shots at the rebel works, but elicited no reply. On the 16th marched and crossed the Coosa River at Resaca at midnight, and parked for the men to breakfast while the division was coming up; passed through Calhoun and camped for the night three miles south. On the 19th camped near Cassville, where we remained until the 23d, when we took up the route of march, fording the Etowah at Island Ford, and after ten miles' march, camped on Island Creek; two days passed without a move. Marched to Burnt Hickory Valley on the 26th. At noon on the 28th moved four miles to the front, returning t