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g the enemy six miles from the river, on the Courtland road, and at once attacked and routed him, caffair. December 30 My infantry moved to Courtland and went into camp on the south side of the y, December 30. Marched at seven A. M. to Courtland, four miles, and encamped. Remained at CourCourtland five days. Wednesday, January 4, 1865. Left Courtland at two P. M., marched back to SnopeCourtland at two P. M., marched back to Snope's, and bivouacked. Thursday, January 5. Marched at dawn of day; made thirteen and a half milesanother stand, but fled ingloriously through Courtland, and for eight miles beyond to Town Creek, otwenty-eight, six miles from Decatur, on the Courtland road, by a daring charge of our advanced guaember, with the whole command and arrived at Courtland on the thirtieth December. On the thirty-ourth of January, received orders to move to Courtland, as Colonel Palmer had been heard from, and other of the enemy's trains. On arriving at Courtland, found that the General commanding, with the[12 more...]
December 28. My artillery and cavalry was crossed, the command rationed, and moved out three miles on the road to Courtland. The cavalry, the Fifteenth Pennsylvania. Colonel Palmer, and detachments of the Second Tennessee. Tenth, Twelfth, and Thirteenth Indiana, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Prosser, amounting in the aggregate to about six hundred and fifty effective men (Colonel Win. L. Palmer, of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania, commanding), moved from Decatur at 8 P. M., and pushed rapir, and detachments of the Second Tennessee. Tenth, Twelfth, and Thirteenth Indiana, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Prosser, amounting in the aggregate to about six hundred and fifty effective men (Colonel Win. L. Palmer, of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania, commanding), moved from Decatur at 8 P. M., and pushed rapidly forward, encountering the enemy six miles from the river, on the Courtland road, and at once attacked and routed him, capturing his artillery, a section of six-pounder brass guns.
December 20. My command moved at daylight, the cavalry in advance, and went into camp at five o'clock, within four miles of Courtland. The infantry met no opposition. The cavalry skirmished most of the day in advance of the infantry, driving the enemy rapidly towards Courtland. At Pond Spring, three miles north-east of Courtmished most of the day in advance of the infantry, driving the enemy rapidly towards Courtland. At Pond Spring, three miles north-east of Courtland, he made a stand, but was immediately charged and routed by my cavalry. The report of Colonel Palmer, commanding the cavalry, herewith forwarded, gives a full account of this affair.mished most of the day in advance of the infantry, driving the enemy rapidly towards Courtland. At Pond Spring, three miles north-east of Courtland, he made a stand, but was immediately charged and routed by my cavalry. The report of Colonel Palmer, commanding the cavalry, herewith forwarded, gives a full account of this affair.
December 30 My infantry moved to Courtland and went into camp on the south side of the town, on Big Nance Creek, the cavalry pushing on as far as Leighton, thirteen miles west of Courtland. At five o'lock P. M. I received a despatch from ColoCourtland. At five o'lock P. M. I received a despatch from Colonel Palmer, written at Leighton, asking my permission to pursue, capture, and destroy Hood's pontoon train. I immediately gave him permission to exercise his own judgment in the matter. He decided to pursue, and in the most splendid manner not onlnel Palmer, I advanced two brigades of infantry, under command of Colonel Thompson, to Town Creek, seven miles west of Courtland, and one brigade, under command of Colonel Salm, to Leighton. General Cruft's division, with the artillery, remained aI advanced two brigades of infantry, under command of Colonel Thompson, to Town Creek, seven miles west of Courtland, and one brigade, under command of Colonel Salm, to Leighton. General Cruft's division, with the artillery, remained at Courtland.
Friday, December 30. Marched at seven A. M. to Courtland, four miles, and encamped. Remained at Courtland five days.Friday, December 30. Marched at seven A. M. to Courtland, four miles, and encamped. Remained at Courtland five days.
Wednesday, January 4, 1865. Left Courtland at two P. M., marched back to Snope's, and bivouacked.
ked any enemy that appeared, and for the patient manner in which they bore, on the most scanty rations, the severe fatigue of this expedition. I desire particularly to recommend for honorable mention in general orders, Sergeant Arthur P. Lyon, of Company A, of the Anderson cavalry, for repeated acts of marked bravery during this short campaign-including the capture of two pieces of artillery, which fell into his hands on the night of December twenty-eight, six miles from Decatur, on the Courtland road, by a daring charge of our advanced guard of fifteen men, which he led on this occasion. We took about one hundred and fifty prisoners after leaving Leighton, including two colonels (one of whom was left in consequence of his wounds), two captains and six lieutenants and destroyed, in all, between seven hundred and fifty and one thousand stand of arms, and captured a considerable number of pistols. Our entire loss, one man killed and two wounded--all (of Lieutenant-Colonel Pross
ing the Charleston and Savannah railroad, between the Coosawatchie and Talifinny rivers. Hood, instead of following Sherman, continued his move northward, which seemed to me to be leading to his certain doom. At all events, had I had the power to command both armies, I should not have changed the orders under which he seemed to be acting. On the twenty-sixth of October the advance of Hood's army attacked the garrison at Decatur, Alabama, but failing to carry the place, withdrew toward Courtland, and succeeded, in the face of our cavalry, in effecting a lodgement on the north side of the Tennessee river, near Florence. On the twenty-eighth Forrest reached the Tennessee at Fort Heiman, and captured a gunboat and three transports. On the second of November he planted batteries above and below Johnsonville, on the opposite side of the river, isolating three gunboats and eight transports. On the fourth the enemy opened his batteries upon the place, and was replied to from the gunbo
and his scouts informed him there was also a corps at Warrenton, Alabama, with Russell's brigade of cavalry at Guntersville, on the river; Roddy's division of cavalry was picketing the south side of the Tennesse from Decatur to Tuscumbia, and Forrest, with the main cavalry force, was reported at Corinth, Mississippi, with outposts at Eastport and along the west bank of the Tennessee. On the twenty-ninth General Granger reported the enemy in his front to be withdrawing from Decatur toward Courtland. The same day General Croxton, commanding a brigade of cavalry picketing the north bank of the river, reported the enemy crossing at the mouth of Cypress creek, two miles below Florence, stating at the same time that he would move with all the force he could spare to drive the enemy back. Directions were sent to General Hatch, commanding a division of cavalry at Clifton, on the east bank of the Tennessee, to move to the support of Croxton at Florence, impressing upon both commanders the
sounded, and the word flew that Roddy had driven in the pickets. Out went the brigade on the Courtland road, and marching six miles, the First Ohio in advance, found pickets, rebel regiments of caved to camp. At eleven A. M., on the twenty-seventh, the brigade left camp, and again took the Courtland road, this time preceded by a brigade of infantry and a battery of artillery. After marching s going quite lively, killing a major and several men, and had got within five or six miles of Courtland, when the rebels opened two fires of artillery on us, and the Fourth, now dismounted, except tnd again our skirmishers advanced, but they met with slight opposition, and at dark we entered Courtland and encamped. Two men were wounded this day, in the Fourth, by shells, neither severely. The rebel force must have been considerable, as Roddy's headquarters had been near Courtland. At six A. M., the twenty-eighth, our brigade, and two pieces of artillery, took the Moulton road, the infan