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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 3 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 11 5 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 10 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Opelika (Alabama, United States) or search for Opelika (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
d a line convex to the enemy, behind Peachtree creek and Chattahoochee river. There was comparative quiet until the 7th, except for the cavalry raid under Rousseau from Decatur, Ala., against the railroad connecting Atlanta with the west, from Opelika to West Point. On the 14th, a division of Federal cavalry also crossed the Chattahoochee near Newnan, and was bravely met and repelled by Armstrong's brigade. Meanwhile the work of strengthening and extending the Confederate intrenchments abou9th, passed without appreciation of Sherman's tactics, though it was known that a considerable Federal force was moving toward the Macon railroad. The general commanding believed that he had taken all necessary precautions. General Adams at Opelika, Ala., was warned of danger; General Hardee, at East Point, was instructed to act on his own discretion, and Generals Lee and Armstrong were both asked to find out where the enemy was. Yet during this day (29th) the armies of Schofield and Thomas t
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
tt's brigade, the totals being 41 killed, 178 wounded, 23 missing. The last considerable military event in Georgia was the cavalry raid of Gen. James H. Wilson in April, 1865. He left Chickasaw, Ala., March 22d, with about 10,000 men, and after defeating and capturing a large part of what was left of General Forrest's cavalry at Selma, entered Georgia. Upton's division marched through Tuskegee toward Columbia, and Colonel LaGrange, with three regiments, advanced on West Point by way of Opelika. Colonel LaGrange found a garrison of 265 devoted Confederates under Gen. Robert C. Tyler in possession of a small fort at West Point. The work was 35 yards square, surrounded by a ditch, supplied with four cannon, and situated on an eminence commanding the Chattahoochee bridge at that point. One assault was repelled by the garrison, but in the second the Federal soldiers swarmed over the little fort and captured the entire command of Tyler, who was killed with 18 of his officers and me
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
covering the retreat of Hardee. Finally, at the battle of Bentonville, he participated honorably in the last important battle in the Carolinas. General Harrison was a brave and daring soldier, and in action shared the dangers of his men. He was twice wounded in battle on John's island, and at Olustee was again wounded and had his horse killed under him. At the close of the war he had just passed his twenty-fourth birthday. He removed to Alabama, where he has ever since made his home, at Opelika. Having studied law during the war, he was soon licensed to practice. Meanwhile he had been elected commandant of cadets at the university of Alabama. This position he declined but subsequently accepted, and served one year in the same position at the State agricultural college. Resuming the practice of law, he gained a worthy prominence in his profession, and in political life became an active worker for the best interests of the people. He was a member of the constitutional conventi