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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 61 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
ering the roads from Randolph and Old Maplesville, with a force estimated by General Wilson at five thousand. General Thomas Jordan, in Campaigns of Forrest's cavalry, states that the Confederate force at Ebenezer Church numbered 1500.--editors. Long's division advanced to the attack, and, reenforced by Alexander's brigade, of Upton's division, carried the position, the report says, in less than an hour, the enemy retreating toward Selma. The whole corps bivouacked at sundown about Plantersville, nineteen miles from Selma. With almost constant fighting the enemy had been driven since morning twenty-four miles. At daylight of the 2d [of April] Long's division took the advance, closely followed by Upton's. Having obtained a well-drawn sketch and complete description of the defenses of Selma, I directed General Long, marching by the flanks of brigades, to approach the city and cross to the Summerville [Summerfield] road without exposing his men, and to develop his line as soon as
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
destroyed the bridge over the Cahawba, at Centreville, and rejoined April 5, 1865. Wildon at Selma. Wilson pushed southward from Randolph with the brigades of Long and Upton, and at-Ebenezer Church, near Boyle's Creek, six miles north of Plantersville, he was confronted by Forrest who had five thousand men behind a strong barricade and abatis. Forrest was straining every nerve to reach and defend Selma, which was one of the most important places in the Confederacy, on account of its immens such vigor, that the Confederates were routed, and fled in confusion toward Selma, leaving behind them two guns and two hundred prisoners in the hands of Alexander, and one gun as a trophy for Long. Winslow's brigade followed them as far as Plantersville, nineteen miles from Selma, where the chase ceased, and the victors bivouacked. Forrest had been driven on that day April 1, twenty-four miles. Selma was now the grand objective of pursued and pursuers. Because of its importance, it ha
oroa factory and Centerville bridge, and rejoining Wilson near Selma. Wilson was moving eagerly and in force on Selma, driving small parties of Rebel cavalry, when he was brought to a halt by Forrest, strongly posted on Boyle's creek, near Plantersville, with a creek on his right and a high, wooded ridge on his left, with 4 guns planted to sweep the Randolph and 2 on the Maplesville road, whereon our troopers were advancing. He had in line about 5,000 men, mainly cavalry (Roddy's division, oying his brigade, and going right in on the left, with such energy that the enemy were soon in headlong flight, leaving 2 guns and 200 prisoners to Alexander, and 1 gun to Long. Winslow's brigade now took the advance, and pursued sharply to Plantersville, 19 miles from Selma; but the fugitives could not be overtaken. Forrest had been driven 24 miles that day. Long's division now April 2. took the lead, followed by Upton's; and all, by 4 P. M., were in sight of Selma. Forrest had here
Tupelo, Miss. Hurricane Creek, Miss.: Booneville, Mo. Little Blue, Mo. Independence, Mo. Big Blue, Mo. Osage River, Mo. Franklin, Tenn. Nashville, Tenn. Rutherford's Creek, Tenn. Pulaski, Tenn. Egypt Station, Miss. Mount Sterling, Ky. Saltville, Va. Sherman's March to the Sea. Griswoldville, Ga. Waynesboro, Ga. Ogeechee River, Ga. the Carolinas Salkahatchie River, S. C. Rockingham, N. C. Solemn Grove, N. C. Averasboro, N. C. Bentonville, N. C. Stoneman's Raid; Plantersville, Ala. Selma, Ala. Tuscaloosa, Ala. Montgomery, Ala. Columbus, Ga. Macon, Ga. Talladega, Ala. Irwinsville, Ga. (capture of Jefferson Davis). In the Western Armies there was no corps organization composed of cavalry until December, 1864, although there were divisions of mounted troops in each military department. Hence the list of cavalry battles given here embraces those which occurred in all the operations west of the Alleghanies. It includes only the more important engagements
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Meeting at the White Sulphur Springs. (search)
m to halt and await orders. This caused a delay of one day, when General Taylor, at Selma, hearing of it, telegraphed orders for the First division to move to Plantersville. Before the division could reach Plantersville, orders came from General Forrest to move to Randolph, about twenty miles further north. Before the division cPlantersville, orders came from General Forrest to move to Randolph, about twenty miles further north. Before the division could reach Randolph, Forrest had been driven from there, and it turned to Plantersville again. The Ochmulgee swamp had now to be crossed, and Armstrong's brigade was five hours in going one mile across it. When this brigade had gone over, it was utterly impassable to the artillery and Starke's brigade; and these, under the directiPlantersville again. The Ochmulgee swamp had now to be crossed, and Armstrong's brigade was five hours in going one mile across it. When this brigade had gone over, it was utterly impassable to the artillery and Starke's brigade; and these, under the direction of a neighborbood guide, were moved to a crossing five miles above, and after working all night, got over about daylight the next morning, and moving rapidly reached Selma just in time to see it burn. Forrest, moving with Jackson's division, heard of Croxton's movement on Tuscaloosa, and changed the march of this division by
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
Dismounted November 1 and ordered to Louisville, Ky. Duty there till December 28. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., thence to Gravelly Springs, Ala., and duty there till March, 1865. Wilson's Raid to Macon, Ga., March 22-April 24. Plantersville, Ala., April 1. Selma April 2. Montgomery April 12. Columbia April 16. Spring Hill, Mimm's Mills, Tobasofkee Creek, Montpelier Springs and Rocky Creek Bridge, near Macon, April 20. Capture of Macon April 20. Post duty at Macon d duty there till December 28. March to Nashville, Tenn., December 28, 1864, to January 8, 1865, thence to Gravelly Springs, Ala., and duty there till March, 1865. Wilson's Raid from Chickasaw, Ala., to Macon, Ga., March 22-April 24. Plantersville and near Randolph April 1. Selma April 2. Montgomery April 12. Columbia April 16. Capture of Macon April 20. Pursuit of Jeff Davis May 6-10. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., May 23-June 15. Mustered out June 26, 1865. Regime
ost entirely stripped of all subsistence for man or beast. At Elyton Croxton's brigade, of McCook's division, was detached and sent to capture and destroy Tuscaloosa, and then march to rejoin the main body near Selma. With the remainder of his command, General Wilson pushed rapidly forward to Montevallo, where he destroyed five extensive iron works, and other valuable property. On the outskirts of the town the enemy's cavalry was found in force, attacked, routed, and pursued through Plantersville, leaving in our possession three pieces of artillery and several hundred prisoners. At three P. M. on the second of April General Wilson reached the immediate vicinity of Selma, and rapidly formed Upton's and Long's divisions to attack the defences of the town — Long attacking on the Summerfield road, and Upton across a swamp deemed impassable by the enemy. Dismounting two regiments from each of the brigades of Colonels Miller and Minty, General Long and those two officers gallantly lea
ce at Ebenezer church, six miles north of Plantersville. Forrest had chosen a position on the norhe whole corps bivouacked at sundown about Plantersville, nineteen miles from Selma. With almost c the action of April first, 1865, near Plantersville, Alabama. command. killed. wounded. missingd Selma was resumed, and we marched on the Plantersville road until within six miles of Selma. We ty prisoners. We camped that night near Plantersville, and on the second instant moved at half-pegiment moved from camp one mile north of Plantersville on the morning of the second, with a fight and attacked and carried the works on the Plantersville road, capturing five pieces of artillery, ving in front of the fortifications on the Plantersville road at four o'clock P. M. It was beingt of one hundred men, and retreated toward Plantersville. On his way he came across a party of Fedtect the wagon trains. Forrest arrived at Plantersville on his retreat, and captured the hospital,[18 more...]
On the night of the thirty-first of March I was encamped ten miles north of Montevallo, and on the night of the first of April I camped at Plantersville, having marched forty-five miles on that day. On the morning of the second I marched at six o'clock, taking the advance on the main road to Selma. The Third Ohio was my advance regiment. It easily drove what small force we met without delaying the column for a moment. About six miles from Selma I turned to the right, taking a cross rnear the cotton gin, which formed a portion of the inner line of works. This was immediately assaulted and carried. Three field pieces were captured in this work. Here we again turned to the left and attacked and carried the works on the Plantersville road, capturing five pieces of artillery, one of them a thirty-pounder Parrott. Report of casualties in Second division cavalry corps, military division of the Mississippi, in the action at Selma, Alabama, on the Second of April, 1865. c
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
Va. 39, 2, 39, 3; 41, 1; 45, 1; 74, 1; 81, 1; 91, 1; 94, 7; 96, 3 Piney Green, N. C. 138, H9; 139, A12 Piney River, Va. 100, 1; 137, E3 Pisgah, Mo. 152, D3 Pitt River, Cal. 171 Pittsburg, Pa. 135-A; 140, A12; 171 Pittsburg, Tenn. 78, 3, 78, 6 Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. 10, 10; 12, 4, 12, 5; 13, 1; 14, 2, 14, 3 Battle of, April 6-7, 1862. See Shiloh, Tenn. Corinth, Miss., to 12, 5 Position Union Army, March 24, 1862 78, 6 Plantersville, Ala. 74, 5; 76, 1; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 148, D5 Plaquemine, La. 23, 8; 135-A; 156, C6; 171 Plaquemine Bayou, La. 23, 8 Platte City, Mo. 119, 1; 135-A; 161, B9 Platte River, Nebr. Ter. 119, 1; 171 Plattsburg, Mo. 119, 1; 135-A; 161, B10 Pleasant Grove, La. 50, 6; 52, 1; 158, E12 Engagement, April 8, 1864 50, 6 Pleasant Hill, Ga. 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 145, C2; 147, B14; 148, B12, 148, D13 Pleasant Hill, La. 50, 6; 52, 1; 53, 1; 13