Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Selma (Alabama, United States) or search for Selma (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 5 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
en from the poop-deck. This mist and rain, in a cloudless sunshiny day, were slowly wafted over the waters toward the fort and pilot town, enabling John W. Bennett, commanding one of the enemy's gun-boats, and George W. Harrison, commanding the other, to shape their courses for safety, in shoal water, and finally under Fort Morgan. Gherardi in the Port Royal (as soon as he could see) saw only the Selma and Metacomet, and continued his course for them. Capture of the Confederate gun-boat Selma by the Metacomet. from a War-time sketch. Whatever damage was done by the Tennessee to the fleet in passing the fort was by the occasional discharge of her guns. She failed to strike a single one of the Union vessels, but was herself run into by the Monongahela, Captain Strong, at full speed. The Tennessee, after colliding with the Monongahela, grazed the bow of the Kennebec, injured slightly the latter's planking, and dropped one of her boats on the deck of the gun-boat.--editors.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The ram Tennessee at Mobile Bay. (search)
. The hull of the Tennessee was constructed on a high bluff near the Alabama River, a short distance above the city of Selma, and all the timber used was cut in the immediate vicinity. She was 209 feet in length and 48 feet in. breadth of beam. When she was prepared for launching, I was ordered by Admiral Buchanan to charter two steamboats and proceed with them to Selma, to tow her down to Mobile, as soon as she was launched. I found on arrival at Selma that every preparation had been madSelma that every preparation had been made for that purpose by the naval constructor in charge (Mr. Henry Pearce). She was immediately taken in tow by the steamboats and towed down to Mobile, to receive her machinery and battery, the latter having been cast at the Government foundry in SelSelma, under the superintendence of Commander Catesby ap Roger Jones, late commander of the Merrimac, who had acquired great distinction as an ordnance officer of the United States navy. The armor plating had been prepared at the rolling-mills of Atla
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Land operations against Mobile. (search)
his transportation. The Union loss during these operations was 189 killed, 1201 wounded, and 27 captured,--a total of 1417. General Randall L. Gibson, the Confederate commander at Spanish Fort, reported a loss of 93 killed, 395 wounded, and 250 missing.--editors. Maury retreated to Meridian, the cavalry sent out from Pensacola to cut him off being prevented by high water from crossing the Alabama and Tombigbee. Meanwhile Wilson, with a reorganized and freshly equipped force of 12,500 cavalry, setting out from the Tennessee on the 18th of March, had completely defeated Forrest and taken Selma, with its fortifications, foundries, and workshops, on the 2d of April, and entered Montgomery on the day Canby gained Mobile. On the news of Johnston's capitulation Taylor surrendered to Canby, on the 4th of May, 1865, at Citronelle, all the remaining forces of the Confederacy east of the Mississippi; on the 26th Kirby Smith followed with the Trans-Mississippi, and the war was ended.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Sooy Smith expedition (February, 1864). (search)
llierville, east of Memphis, on the 1st of February, and to join Sherman at Meridian as near the 10th as possible, destroying public property and supplies and the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, from Okolona south. [See map, p. 348.] Sherman's orders to Smith were, Attack any force of cavalry you may meet and follow them south. . . . Do not let the enemy draw you into minor affairs, but look solely to the greater object — to destroy his communications from Okolona to Meridian and then east toward Selma. Reference was made to previous verbal instructions covering all points. Sherman left Vicksburg with his force February 3d, reached Meridian on the 14th, remained there until the 20th, and in Canton until the 28th, hoping to receive word of Smith's whereabouts. None coming, he then returned to Vicksburg. Smith's command comprised three brigades of cavalry: First, Waring's; Second, Hepburn's; Third, McCrillis's; and a battalion of the 4th (regular) Cavalry, commanded by Captain Bowman
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
of making a demonstration upon Tuscaloosa and Selma in favor of General Canby's operations againstled to watch equally Columbus, Tuscaloosa, and Selma. The command moved southward in three colue road, and rejoin it at or in the vicinity of Selma. Besides covering our trains and inflicting aoining Forrest in my front, or in the works at Selma. I also learned that a force of dismounted meless than an hour, the enemy retreating toward Selma. The whole corps bivouacked at sundown about Plantersville, nineteen miles from Selma. With almost constant fighting the enemy had been drivech and complete description of the defenses of Selma, I directed General Long, marching by the flan General Upton's division was dispatched from Selma, on April 3d, to open communications with McCo had returned east of the Cahawba. He reached Selma in company with Upton on the 6th. Nothing wasGeneral Wilson, believing that he had rendered Selma valueless by his thorough destruction of railr[2 more...]