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told again and again that they were free. Again, on the 17th, she writes: I saw many of the neighbours yesterday, and compared losses. We are all pretty severely pillaged. The infantry regiment from Heathsville took their departure on Sunday morning, in the Alice Price, stopped at Bushfield, and about twelve took breakfast there. Mr. B. says the vessel was loaded with plunder, and many negroes. They took off all the negroes from the Mantua estate; broke up the beautiful furniture at Summerfield, and committed depredations everywhere. A company of them came up as far as Cary's on Saturday evening, and met the cavalry. They stole horses enough on their way to be pretty well mounted. They will blazon forth this invasion of a country of women, children, and old men, as a brilliant feat! Now that they are gone, we breathe more freely, but for how long a time? We feel very anxious about our friends between the Rappahannock and Potomac, both rivers filled with belligerent vessels
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
ear and, if possible, connect with Croxton, who was still west of the Cahawba. Long and Upton, with their men dismounted, carried the works at a single charge. The fortifications assaulted and carried consisted of a bastioned line, on a radius of nearly three miles, extending from the Alabama River below to the same above the city. The part west of the city is covered by a miry, deep, and almost impassable creek; that on the east side by a swamp extending from the river almost to the Summerfield road, and entirely impracticable for mounted men at all times. General Upton ascertained by a personal reconnoissance that dismounted men might with great difficulty work through it on the left of the Range Line road. The profile of that part of the line assaulted is as follows: Height of parapet, six to eight feet, thickness eight feet, depth of ditch five feet, width from ten to fifteen feet; height of stockade on the glacis, five feet, sunk into the earth four feet. The ground over w
e out, and before Lincoln's proclamation was issued, a young Virginian named Summerfield was visiting the city of New York, where he made the acquaintance of two Misin making up the overcoats and clothing for the volunteers from their town. Summerfield expressed his regret that they must leave, but at the same time especially r at the flash of the gun, and upon rushing up to secure the dead man's arms, Summerfield observed that he had a fine new overcoat strapped to his back, which he determined to appropriate to his own use. The fight was over, and Summerfield had time to examine his prize, when, remarkable as it may appear, the coat was marked in th in the pockets were found letters, signed with the name of the sister, whom Summerfield had known in New York, and to whom he had made the remark we have quoted, in a melancholy fulfilment. We are assured this narrative is literally true. Summerfield now wears the coat, and, our informant states, is not a little impressed wit
Montevallo, where he destroyed five extensive iron works, and other valuable property. On the outskirts of the town the enemy's cavalry was found in force, attacked, routed, and pursued through Plantersville, leaving in our possession three pieces of artillery and several hundred prisoners. At three P. M. on the second of April General Wilson reached the immediate vicinity of Selma, and rapidly formed Upton's and Long's divisions to attack the defences of the town — Long attacking on the Summerfield road, and Upton across a swamp deemed impassable by the enemy. Dismounting two regiments from each of the brigades of Colonels Miller and Minty, General Long and those two officers gallantly leading their men in person, charged across an open field five hundred yards wide, over a stockade which they tore up as they passed, through the ditch, and over the enemy's parapets, sweeping everything before them. Our loss was forty-six killed and two hundred wounded; Colonel Dodds, Fourth Ohio,
wamp extending from the river almost to the Summerfield road, and entirely impracticable for mountekirmishers, held all the ground between the Summerfield road on the left, and the enemy's works on right, taking a cross road which led to the Summerfield road. At about three P. M. I found my left in search of a wagon train in direction of Summerfield. Captain Montry, of Company H, was ordered fronting the bridge over the ravine on the Summerfield road, and between the two redoubts. After redoubt contained four guns, commanding the Summerfield road. Five guns swept the railroad, and tw detour, was sent under cover across to the Summerfield road on the upper ridge. The brigade wasown men, passed through to the works on the Summerfield road unharmed, charged and secured the bridmmanding, made a march to the rear, through Summerfield, to Johnson's Ferry, returning on the sixthond division swept over the defences on the Summerfield road, while the Fourth division carried tho[7 more...]
irty-first of March I was encamped ten miles north of Montevallo, and on the night of the first of April I camped at Plantersville, having marched forty-five miles on that day. On the morning of the second I marched at six o'clock, taking the advance on the main road to Selma. The Third Ohio was my advance regiment. It easily drove what small force we met without delaying the column for a moment. About six miles from Selma I turned to the right, taking a cross road which led to the Summerfield road. At about three P. M. I found my left in front of the works around Selma. In accordance with orders from Brigadier-General Long, I sent the Third Ohio to the right and rear to cover led horses and pack mules. The other three regiments, Fourth Ohio, Seventh Pennsylvania, and Fourth Michigan, were dismounted, and formed line about half a mile from the works. A strong skirmish line was pushed forward a few hundred yards in advance, and was immediately engaged with the enemy's skirmi
; assistant surgeons, Gore, of Kentucky; Hewes, of Louisville, Kentucky; Welford, of Virginia; Redwood, of Mobile, Alabama, and some others whose names I cannot now recall. Dr. W. T. McAllister was surgeon in charge of the Buckner. Of the assistant surgeons I can only remember Dr. W. S. Lee, then of Florida, now a successful practitioner and an honored citizen of Dallas, Texas; Dr. R. D. Jackson, of Selma; Alabama, who since the war has lived a well-beloved physician and druggist in Summerfield, Alabama; Dr. Reese, also of Alabama, and Dr. Yates, of Texas, now dead. For a few months Dr. Francis Thornton, of Kentucky, was surgeon of the post. He was a fiery, impetuous, manly man, a rigid disciplinarian, but always compelled to fight against the dictates of his large, warm heart when duty compelled him to execute severe justice. Mrs. Thornton was one of the most lovable women I ever knew; impulsive and earnest in her friendship, of a sunny, cheerful temperament seldom clouded. He
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
0, 3; 79, 6; 159, B11; 160, E11 Sugar Creek, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 97, 1; 135-A Sugar Loaf, N. C. 132, 1; 139, C10 Sugar Loaf Mountain, Md. 25, 6; 27, 1; 116, 2 Sugar Valley, Ga. 24, 3; 48, 1; 57, 1-57, 3; 58, 1, 58, 2; 62, 1; 76, 2; 118, 1; 149, E11 Sullivan's Island, S. C. 4, 1; 131, 1 Sulphur Spring, Ark. 159, D10 Sulphur Springs, Tenn. 24, 3; 31, 2 Sulphur Springs, Va. 21, 13; 22, 5, 22, 7; 94, 1; 100, 1; 137, E2, 137, G5; 142, A9 Summerfield, Ala. 117, 1; 148, E5 Summertown, Tenn. 24, 3; 35, 6; 49, 1, 49, 2; 97, 1; 111, 9; 118, 1; 149, C10 Summerville, Ga. 48, 1; 57, 1, 57, 3; 69, 5; 70, 1; 76, 1; 88, 2; 118, 1; 135-A; 143, F7; 144, B8; 149, E10 Summerville, W. Va. 135-A; 140, H10 Summit Point, W. Va. 43, 7; 74, 1; 81, 4; 85, 1; 116, 2 Fort Sumner, N. Mex. 98, 1 Fort Sumter, S. C. 1, 1-1, 3; 2, 1; 4, 1; 38, 2; 91, 4; 117, 1; 131, 1; 135-A; 143, H14; 144, D14; 171 Views 121, 1, 171
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical sketch of the Rockbridge artillery, C. S. Army, by a member of the famous battery. (search)
ings, James M. Reintzell, George W. Rhodes, Jacob N. *Robertson, John W. Robinson, Arthur *Root, Erastus C. *Ruffin, Jefferson R. Rutledge, Charles A. *Sandford, James Saville, John *Shaner, Joseph F. *Shaw, Campbell A. *Shoulder, Jacob M. *Silvey, James A. Singleton, William F. Schermerhorn, John G. Smith, Adam Smith, J. Howard Smith, James P. Smith, James Morrison Smith, Josiah Smith, Joseph S. *Smith, Samuel C. Smith, Summerfield Stewart, George W. Strickler, James A. *Strickler, John, Jr. *Strickler, William L. *Stuart, William C. *Swann, Minor W. Swann, Robert W. *Swisher, Benjamin R. *Swisher, George W. *Swisher, Samuel S. *Tate, James F. Taylor, Charles S. *Taylor, Stevens M. Tharp, Benjamin F. Thompson, Ambrose *Thompson, John A. *Thompson, Lucas P. Thompson, Samuel G. *Tidball, Thomas H. Timberlake, Francis H. Tomlinson, James W. Tompkins, Joh
ore the war broke out, and before Lincoln's proclamation was issued, a young Virginian, named Summerfield, was visiting in the city of New York, where he made the acquaintance of two Misses Holmes, f; the victim fell at the flash of the gun, and upon rushing up to secure the dead man's arms, Summerfield observed that he had a fine new overcoat strapped to his back, which he determined to appropriate to his own use. The fight was over, and Summerfield had time to examine his prize, when, remarkable as it may appear, the coat was marked in the lining with the name of Thomas Holmes, and in the pockets were found letters signed with the name of the sister, whom Summerfield had known in New York, and to whom he had made the remark we have quoted, in which the dead man was addressed as broth made in jest had a melancholy fulfillment. We are assured this narrative is literally true, Summerfield now wears the coat, and our informant states is not a little impressed with the singularity o
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