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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 101 37 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 20 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 16 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) or search for Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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1st Indiana cavalry, Lt.-Col. Wood, with two howitzers, when an impetuous charge was made by the Indianians, whereby the enemy were routed and put to flight. The bodies of 110 dead Rebels were buried by our soldiers, whose loss was but 8 killed and 45 wounded, including Maj. Glendennin, who led the charge, receiving a shot in the breast, which proved mortal. The Rebels were satisfied with this experiment, and gave no further trouble. Gen. Curtis again struck July 9. White river at Clarendon, just below the mouth of the Cache, only to learn, with intense chagrin, that Col. Fitch, with the expected gunboats and transports, had gone down the river barely 24 hours previous. Being short of provisions, in a thoroughly inhospitable country, he had no choice but to make his way to the most accessible point on the Mississippi. This was Helena, 65 miles S. E., which was made July 11. by Gen. Washburne, with 2,500 cavalry and 5 howitzers, in a march of 24 hours, the infantry coming
water. The crew of the Gen. Bragg and the Sumter escaped in like manner; while the swifter Gen. Van Dorn fled down the river. The battle had lasted a little over an hour, and its result was most decisive. No man was killed on board our fleet. Memphis, whose population had all been interested spectators of the combat, surrendered immediately. An expedition, comprising four gunboats and a steam transport, conveying the 46th Indiana, Col. Fitch, was soon dispatched up the Arkansas and White rivers, to open communication with Gen. Curtis, known to be approaching from the West. Reaching St. Charles, the Mound City, then in advance, was fired on from two concealed batteries, and replied, while our troops were landed below to take those batteries in the rear. A ball, from a siegegun on the bluff, pierced the side of the Mound City, and passed through her steam-drum, filling the vessel instantly with the scalding vapor. Of the 175 persons on board, barely 23 escaped injury. Many jum
ore important points therein. Yet it was left unassailed till near the close of the siege of Vicksburg, ere which, Lt.-Gen. Holmes, commanding in Arkansas, had solicited June 14, 1863. of Lt.-Gen. Kirby Smith, chief of the trans-Mississippi department, permission to attack it; which was readily granted. Meantime, the Confederate Secretary of War had not merely sanctioned the enterprise, but suggested and urged it. Thus authorized and stimulated, Holmes left June 26. Little Rock for Clarendon, which he had designated as the rendezvous for his forces. Fagan, with a part of his men, was promptly on hand; but Sterling Price, owing to heavy rains and consequent high water, was unable to arrive till four days afterward. June 30. The attempt at surprise was thus baffled; Maj.-Gen. B. M. Prentiss, commanding at Helena, being seasonably aware of his peril, and fully on the alert to repel it. He had 3,800 effectives, behind strong earth works mounted with serviceable guns, with the
on, with nearly 6,000 more men, mainly mounted, and 18 guns, soon joined him from Missouri; swelling his aggregate to 12,000 men and 40 guns. Steele soon moved out, Aug. 10. Davidson's cavalry in advance; crossing White river Aug. 17. at Clarendon, and sending forward Aug. 22. Davidson to reconnoiter the enemy's position at Brownsville, while he shipped his extra supplies and his sick — by this time numbering 1,000--down to Duvall's bluff, which was accounted the healthiest spot in thacuated; retreating to his intrenchments at Bayou Metea; whence he was, after some fighting, dislodged Aug. 27. and driven over the bayou; burning the bridge behind him, and so checking pursuit. Gen. True's brigade, from Memphis, reaching Clarendon on the 29th, was ferried over the White next day, and a general advance resumed; Steele concentrating at Brownsville, and, after attempting to pass Bayou Metea on the north and being baffled by miry swamps, decided to move by the left to the Ar
n the mud, and devouring it with keen voracity. Steele entered Little Rock May 2d. Late June, Shelby crossed the Arkansas eastward of Little Rock, pushing northward to the White, near its mouth; and was met June 27. near St. Charles by four regiments under Gen. Carr, who worsted him, taking 200 prisoners. Our loss here in killed and wounded was 200; that of the Rebels was estimated by our officers at 500. Marmaduke soon approaching with renforcements for Shelby, Carr fell back on Clarendon, 20 miles below Duvall's bluff, where he also was reenforced; when the enemy retreated southward. There were, of course, a good many partisan encounters and raids during the Summer; in one of which a Union scouting party, under Capt. Jug, dashed July 25. into Benton and killed Brig.-Gen. Geo. M Holt; in another, Col. W. S. Brooks 56th U. S. colored, moving out from Helena with 400 men, was attacked July 26. on Big creek by Gen. Dobbins, with a superior Rebel force, and would have