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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 101 37 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 20 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 16 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) or search for Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 10 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alaska, (search)
pidly as the face of the country would permit, the advantages of civilization hitherto unknown in that bleak region. Early in 1898 an aerial railway was constructed over the Chilkoot Pass to Lake Linderman, a unique enterprise that shortened the time between tidewater and the headwaters of the Yukon River from a month to a day, and removed the perils and hardships of former travels. At the end of that year the first section of the first railroad built in Alaska was completed. This was the White Pass and Yukon Railroad, projected to extend from Skagway to Fort Selkirk. The section ended at Summit, the highest point of the divide, and work was then in progress on the Canadian section of the line. At the same time the Canadian government had selected five routes for railways in the Yukon region, which it was thought might be provided with sea-coast outlets in the territory of the United States. In 1900 the all-water route to the Klondike was 2.705 miles from Seattle to St. Michae
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bache, George M., 1840-1896 (search)
Bache, George M., 1840-1896 Naval officer; born in the District of Columbia, Nov. 12, 1840; was graduated at the Naval Academy in 1860. He became lieutenant in 1862; lieutenant-commmander in 1866; and commander in 1875; and was retired April 5, 1875. He commanded an ironclad gunboat on the Mississippi early in the Civil War, and behaved with great bravery before Vicksburg. He was afterwards in command of a little squadron of gunboats in a spirited action near Clarendon, Ark., in June, 1864. He died in Washington, D. C., Feb. 11, 1896.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Charles ii. 1630- (search)
les in the gardens at Hampton Court, and presented their memorial so full of pious pretensions, the monarch, after looking each man in the face for a moment, with a merry twinkle in his eves, burst into loud laughter, in which his audience joined involuntarily. Then taking up a little shaggy spaniel, with large meek eyes, and holding it at arm's-length before them, he said, Good friends, here is a model of piety and sincerity which it might be wholesome for you to copy. Then, tossing the little pet to Clarendon, he said, There, Hyde, is a worthy prelate; make him archbishop of the domain I shall give you. With grim satire, Charles introduced into the preamble of their charter that the petitioners, excited with a laudable and pious zeal for the propagation of the Gospel, have begged a certain country in the parts of America not yet cultivated and planted, and only inhabited by some barbarous people who have no knowledge of God. See State of North Carolina; State of South Carolina.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
ed to the Department of Maryland, and General Dix ordered to Fortress Monroe.—3. National troops landed on James Island, S. C.—4. Battle near Trentor's Creek, N. C. Skirmish on James Island, S. C.—5. Artillery battle at New Bridge, near Richmond; Confederates defeated.—6. Tax bill passed United States Senate. Battle of Union Church, near Harrisonburg, Va. —14. A severe battle on James Island, S. C.—17. Battle between Union gunboats and Confederate batteries at St. Charles, on the White River, Ark., the batteries being carried.—18. Confederate works at Cumberland Gap, Tenn., occupied by National troops.—19. An act confiscating the slaves of Confederates passed the United States House of Representatives.—20. Commodore Porter arrived before Vicksburg with ten mortar-boats. Free territory act signed by President Lincoln.—26. High Court of Impeachment ordered Judge Humphreys to be removed from office and disqualified. Confederates destroy their gunboats on the Yazoo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornbury, Edward Hyde, Lord -1723 (search)
Cornbury, Edward Hyde, Lord -1723 Colonial governor; was sent to the province of New York as governor in 1702, when he was Sir Edward Hyde, grandson of the first Earl of Clarendon, and nephew, by marriage, of James II. He was one of the officers of that monarch's household, and was the first to desert him and go over to the Prince of Orange, who became William III, of England. Grateful for this act, William made him governor of the united provinces of New York and New Jersey. He was coad to Cornbury by the speaker, in which he was directly accused, among other things, of being an extortioner and the merchandise of faction. Finally, such representations went from both provinces to the board of trade that Queen Anne removed him (1708), though he was her cousin. Then his creditors threw him into prison, from which he was released by accession to the peerage on the death of his father, when he returned to England and became Earl of Clarendon. He died in London, April 1, 1723.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), James ii., 1633-1671 (search)
guardianship of the Duke of Northumberland, and lived in the palace. When the overthrow of monarchy appeared inevitable, in 1648, he fled to the Netherlands, with his mother and family, and he was in Paris when Charles I. was beheaded. He entered the French service (1651), and then the Spanish (1655), and was treated with much consideration by the Spaniards. His brother ascended the British throne in 1660 as Charles ii., and the same year James married Anne Hyde, daughter of the Earl of Clarendon. She died in 1671, and two years afterwards, James married Maria Beatrice Eleanor, a princess of the House of Este, of Modena, twenty-five years younger than himself. While in exile James had become a Roman Catholic, but did not acknowledge it until 1671. He had become a commander in the British navy, but the test-act of 1673 caused him to leave all public employments. Being sent to Scotland as head of the administration there, he treated the Covenanters with great cruelty. When Charl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnson-Clarendon convention, (search)
Johnson-Clarendon convention, The treaty negotiated by Reverdy Johnson, while minister to England, dated Jan. 14, 1869. This treaty proposed a mixed commission for the consideration of all claims, including the Alabama claims. The treaty, which was the foundation of the subsequent successful one, was rejected by the United States Senate, as the provision made in it for national losses was not satisfactory. See Johnson, Reverdy.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, State of (search)
t for a domain south of Virginia, 6° of latitude in width, and extending westward to the Pacific Ocean. Heath did not meet his engagements, and the patent was vacated. In March, 1663, Charles II. granted to eight of his rapacious courtiers a charter for the domain granted to Heath. They had begged it from the King under the pretence of a pious zeal for the propagation of the Gospel among the heathen. These courtiers were the covetous and time-serving premier and historian, the Earl of Clarendon; George Monk, who, for his conspicuous and treacherous services in the restoration of the monarch to the throne of England, had been created Duke of Albemarle; Lord Craven, the supposed dissolute husband of the Queen of Bohemia; Sir Anthony Ashley Cooper, afterwards Earl of Shaftesbury; Sir John Colleton, a corrupt loyalist, who had played false to Cromwell; Lord John Berkeley and his brother, then governor of Virginia (see Berkeley, Sir William), and Sir George Carteret (q. v.), a propr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, (search)
of coast, see colony of Virginia, 1584-90. John Porey, secretary of the colony of Virginia, explores the country to the Chowan River......1622 Charles I. grants a patent for all the territory between lat. 36° and 31° N. to Sir Robert Heath......1629-30 Roger Green, with colonists from Virginia, settles on the Roanoke and the Chowan rivers......July, 1653 Chief of the Yeopim Indians grants to George Durant land in Perquimans county......1662 Charles II. grants to the Earl of Clarendon and seven others territory extending westward from the Atlantic Ocean between lat. 31° and 36°, which they call Carolina......March 20, 1663 Berkeley, governor of Virginia, visits Carolina, organizes a government for the northern part, calling it Albemarle county, and appoints William Drummond governor......1663 Several hundred persons, under Sir John Yeamans, land at the junction of Cape Fear River and Old Town Creek, and lay out a village called Charlestown, near the present site o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), South Carolina, (search)
ted out by Admiral Coligny, under Jean Ribault, of Dieppe, explores St. Helena Sound and Port Royal, and builds Charles Fort, near Beaufort......1562 Charles II. conveys by charter territory lying between lat. 31° and 36° N., to the Earl of Clarendon and seven others, who form a proprietary and call the country Carolina......March 20, 1663 Grant of land to the Earl of Clarendon and others enlarged and extended to lat. 29° N......June 30, 1665 Capt. William Sayle explores the coast....Clarendon and others enlarged and extended to lat. 29° N......June 30, 1665 Capt. William Sayle explores the coast......1667 Settlement near Port Royal by a few English colonists with William Sayle as governor......1670 Settlers at Port Royal remove to the western bank of the Ashley River and found Old Charleston......1671 Settlement at Charleston increased by a small colony from Barbadoes under Sir John Yeamans. With this colony came the first slaves in South Carolina......1671 Freemen of Carolina meet at Charleston and elect representatives for the civil government of the colony......1674 Fu