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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 101 37 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 20 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 16 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) or search for Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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outhern Arkansas and Louisiana and Texas, and an abundant supply of arms and munitions of war from east of the Mississippi, and caused information to that effect to reach Curtis. With his cavalry he hovered around him, drove in his pickets, and at every favorable opportunity attacked him in flank and rear. These maneuvers and deceptions had their effect, for in a short time Curtis became alarmed and retired with his army of 15,000 men from Bayou Des Arc to the cover of his ironclads on White river, and then to Helena. In the meantime officers and soldiers of the Missouri State Guard who had crossed the river with General Price were returning, individually and by companies, to renew the fight for the protection of Arkansas and the States further south, and to recover possession of their own State. All of them were actively engaged recruiting or preparing to recruit in Missouri. General Parsons, as has been said, returned from Tupelo with the remnants of the State Guard. Col. Joh
d went to Helena. As soon as Davidson had disappeared a light ironclad boat came up White river to very nearly where Shelby's brigade was camped, and Colonel Thompson undertook to capture it. But the boat was bullet-proof, and in the fight Lieut.-Col. Charles Gilkey, commanding Jeans' regiment, was killed, and Maj. David Shanks of the same regiment was severely wounded. Davidson's column was only part of a force General Frederick Steele was concentrating at Devall's Bluff on the lower White river for the purpose of taking Little Rock. On the 24th of July General Price was assigned to the command of the district of Arkansas on account of the sickness of General Holmes, and General Fagan was assigned to the command of General Price's division. About the middle of August Marmaduke moved with his division from Jacksonport to form a junction with General Walker at Brownsville. When they met, Walker, as the ranking officer, took command. A few hours after Marmaduke reached Brownsvil
ed bodies of the enemy, and one of his lieutenants and a number of his men were captured. He soon cut his way out, and these were the only prisoners he lost. But constant marching and fighting, loss of sleep and lack of food, were telling on his men, and it became evident to the sturdy soldier that he must reach a place of safety soon or succumb. He made a detour around Springfield, passed between Mount Vernon and Greenfield, both heavily garrisoned by the Federals, and was approaching White river when his way was barred by 200 Federal cavalry. The cavalry were quickly dispersed and thirty horses fell into the hands of the victors, which served to mount the men whose horses had given out or been killed. That night Shelby's scouts and Shanks' scouts met. The two commands were camped not five miles apart. About as quickly as a tired horse could travel five miles, Shelby was informed of Shanks' safety, and he at once aroused his camp and a shout went up that could have been heard
king a recruit with him, Shelby moved the brigade quietly but swiftly down to Clarendon, on White river, fourteen miles below Devall's Bluff. At Clarendon, his scouWhite river, fourteen miles below Devall's Bluff. At Clarendon, his scouts informed him, was an ironclad gunboat. anchored in midstream—the Queen City. After night he approached the town, surrounded it with his scouts, with orders to aClarendon, his scouts informed him, was an ironclad gunboat. anchored in midstream—the Queen City. After night he approached the town, surrounded it with his scouts, with orders to arrest every person coming and going and at midnight, with artillery muffled, crept stealthily into the town, masked his battery where he could sweep the deck of the session of the field and was entitled to claim the victory. This fighting at Clarendon could not fail to attract the attention of the troops at Devall's Bluff, fouramp at Jacksonport, where he had constructed a sort of pontoon bridge across White river. While Shelby had been engaged on his Clarendon expedition he had not beeClarendon expedition he had not been unmindful of the condition of things farther west in the district. He had sent Capt. Maurice Langhorne and his company on a scouting foray in the direction of Sea