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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 22 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 19, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 19, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Elm Springs (Arkansas, United States) or search for Elm Springs (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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of March, and being satisfied that the enemy, who had halted on Sugar Creek, 55 miles distant, was only awaiting large reinforcements before he would advance, I resolved to attack him at once. Accordingly, I sent for Gen. Pike to join me near Elm Springs with the forces under his command, and, on the morning of the 4th of March, moved with the divisions of Price and McCulloch, by way of Fayetteville and Bentonville, to attack the enemy's main camp on Sugar Creek. The whole force under my command was about 16,000 men. On the 6th we left Elm Springs for Bentonville, and from prisoners captured by our scouting parties on the 5th I became convinced that up to that time no suspicion was entertained of our advance, and that there were strong hopes of our effecting a complete surprise, and attacking the enemy before the large detachments encamped at various points in the surrounding country could rejoin the main body. I therefore endeavored to reach Bentonville, 11 miles distant, by