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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
command were pushed out to cover the road leading by Morrow's Mills to Decatur. General Newton, at Mann's house, on the Shoal Creek road, reported the enemy in considerable force, and intrenched between himself and Morrow's Mills. Early August 31 the corps was moved in the direction of Rough and Ready by way of Thorn's Mill. General Newton was instructed to remain in position until he should be joined by General Schofield's force, and then to follow. Arriving in sight of the mills on Crooked Creek, on the Decatur road, a long line of breast-works could be seen on the opposite side of the creek. These were occupied, but in what force we could not at once determine. Kimball's and Wood's divisions were deployed, and pushing forward a strong line of skirmishers, the enemy, who proved to be dismounted cavalry, abandoned the works and took to their heels. Verbal instructions having been received to push a strong reconnaissance to the railroad southeast of Rough and Ready in conjuncti
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
division leading. August 27, left at 3 p. m., bringing up the rear of the corps and guarding the baggage train; passing the rest of the corps in camp, and crossed Camp Creek, covering the road to Fairburn. August 28, moved second in order of march, and took position near Red Oak, on the West Point railroad. August 29, remained in camp. August 30, marched first in order, and took position at Mann's house. Our march this day was much impeded by the Fourteenth Corps. August 31, crossed Crooked Creek at the mill; remained there to guard the trains and artillery, while the rest of the corps moved forward to strike the railroad. Toward evening took up position on the right of the First Division. September 1, marched toward Jonesborough by the railroad, destroying the track as we went, the First Division in the lead. Late in the afternoon proceeded to Jonesborough, where the division was formed to attack and turn the enemy, this division being on the extreme left. We advanced rapidly
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
hree-quarters of a mile from his camp, the enemy in force. Citizens report that the enemy is about Morrow's Mill, on Crooked Creek (about one mile and a quarter in our front), and that he is in strong works, about three miles long. He arrived at ty from their works. They ran at our approach and they were dismounted cavalry. Their works were on the east side of Crooked Creek. Our corps crossed at Thorn's Mill, Schofield's at Morrow's. 11p. m., directed Generals Kimball and Wood to move foroward the Atlanta and Macon Railroad. Our scout reports that it is only one mile and a half to it fiom this point on Crooked Creek (Thorn's Mill). General Newton's division to remain at the creek. 1.30 p. m., General Wood's head of column started road, Kimball's division on the left, then Wood's, then Newton's. This line is straight and runs from the railroad to Crooked Creek at Thorn's Mill. It is one mile and three-quarters long and faces Jonesborough. General Schofield's right connects