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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) or search for Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
State has long since perpetuated his memory. The conduct of young Wyatt was spoken of in the highest terms by J. B. Magruder, colonel commanding the Confederate forces, by his own regimental commander, D. H. Hill, by George W. Randolph, then in charge of the Richmond Howitzers, and afterwards Secretary of War for the Confederacy, and by all who on that day were witnesses of his gallant but unavailing heroism. The remains were taken to Richmond and interred in the soldier's section in Hollywood, near where the Confederate monument now is. A board of pine, inscribed with his name, regiment, time and place of death, was his only monument. In 1887 this had rotted away and was found face downward. I do not know that the grave has yet been properly marked. But the State of North Carolina has shown her sense of duty and gratitude to the young hero. The General Assembly, of 1891, ordered an oil painting (25x30) of Wyatt, to be made at the public expense. The work was executed by
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
re; a granite column (nearly finished) in Marshall Park (Libby Hill) to all of the soldiers and sailors of the Confederacy; a statue to Stonewall Jackson in the Capitol Square; a granite pyramidal pile to the twelve thousand Confederate dead in Hollywood, and in the same cemetary monuments over the graves of Pickett, Stuart, Maury and others; a statue of Wickham in Monroe Park, and an equestrian statue of Lee at the west end of Franklin street. Our duty in this respect to A. P. Hill is also donhin the next two years, judging from present prospects, the regiment would be second to no similar organization in the United States. The visiting millitary companies began to leave the city immediately after the return from the exercises at Hollywood, and at 10 o'clock last night the armories were as quiet as they are when the boys are all off at encampment. The Monticello Guards, of Charlottesville, were the last infantrymen to take their departure, while the Lynchburg and Surry compani