hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) or search for Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 1 document section:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.2 (search)
It was obedience even unto death. From the Richmond, Va., Times, October 29, 1899. Grave in Hollywood recalls a story of devotion to duty. Came South to fight with us. James H. Beers, of Connecticut, who fell at Chancellorsville—Ran the gauntlet when he left Home—Services for the Confederacy. Within the last few days there has been placed over a low mound in my family lot in Hollywood, a simple granite marker bearing this inscription: James H. Beers, of Connectcut, who fell at Chancellorsville fighting for Virginia and the South, May 3, 1863. The erection of this modest stone not only marks the discharge of an obligati everything connected with the matter, except the sad scene at the grave, seems to have faded out of my recollection. I know he was buried in our family lot in Hollywood, and, as no one of us was buried there for long years after this, we must have bought the lot for the purpose. Yes; I remember, too, that we laid him to rest wi