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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) or search for Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of the history Committee of the Grand Camp C. V., Department of Virginia. (search)
ognizing then, as I do now, both my inability and the lack of time at my command, for the proper discharge of the duty thus assigned me, I earnestly asked to be excused from the undertaking, and nothing but my devotion, both to Dr. McGuire and the Confederate cause, could have induced me to consent to undertake a work for which I felt so poorly prepared. Since that time, the hand that strikes no erring blow, has taken from us our able and beloved Chairman, and he now sleeps in beautiful Hollywood. I have no words to express the personal loss I feel at this calamity, and I know that you, and each of you, share with me in these feelings. Distinguished both in war and in peace, for ability and fidelity to every trust, there was nothing for which he was more distinguished than for his love and fidelity to our cause, and to those who fought to sustain it. He is lost to us as counsellor and friend. He is lost to us as our leader in labor for the truth. I am here not to supply his pl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Confederate States Artillery. (search)
s gun that Col. William R. Johnson Pegram was killed —the Christian warrior, the modest young soldier, who had lived long enough to win the plaudits of the whole army. Specs, as the boys used affectionately to call him, was always ready to lead. Noble Willie Pegram! Alas! the war had claimed another patriot as a victim. He was buried temporarily at Ford's Station, on the Southside Railroad, while the troops were on the retreat, and his remains were afterwards taken up and reinterred in Hollywood. As the evening shadows begin to gather around our yet gallant band, the order to limber up is heard, and the troops start on the retreat. Immediately after the order to limber up, consequent upon the battle of Five Forks, which occurred about sundown on Saturday, April 1, 1865, the Crenshaw Battery, with its three guns (one gun and most of its gallant crew, under the immediate command of Lieutenant Hollis, having been captured by the troops of Warren, commanding the Fifth Corps), move