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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 56 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 35 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 33 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 26 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 24 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Pea Ridge, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) or search for Pea Ridge, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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near Leetown, across Sugar creek, and in close proximity to General Curtis's center position. Pea Ridge is the designation of the elevated table-land, broken by ravines, and filling a large bend of Gens. Ben McCulloch and Mcintosh killed, Gens. Price and Slack were wounded. The victory at Pea Ridge was unmistakably ours, but the trophies were not abundant. No cannon, nor caissons, nor prison less wasted and exhausted than that which for many miles surrounded the well-fought field of Pea Ridge. As this was the only important battle in which Indians in considerable numbers took partIndian Territory, from which they collected the four or five thousand warriors who appeared at Pea Ridge; but, though the ground was mainly broken and wooded, affording every facility for irregular wMississippi some time previously. Schofield pressed on Oct. 17 to the old battle-ground of Pea Ridge, only to find the enemy's forces divided: a part, under Cooper, having moved westward toward M
hat Magrluder had abandoned his works, including Yorktown, during the preceding night, retreating up the Peninsula. Gen. John G. Barnard, Gen. McClellan's chief engineer through the Peninsula campaign, in a report to his commander at the close of that campaign, says: At the time the Army of the Potomac landed on the Peninsula, the Rebel cause was at its lowest ebb. Its armies were demoralized by the defeats of Port Royal, Mill Spring, Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Roanoke Island, and Pea Ridge; and reduced by sickness, loss in battle, expirations of period of service, etc.; while the conscription law was not yet even passed. It seemed as if it needed but one vigorous gripe to end forever this Rebellion, so nearly throttled. How, then, happened it, that the day of the initiation of the campaign of this magnificent Army of the Potomac was the day of the resuscitation of the Rebel cause, which seemed to grow pari passu with the slow progress of its operations? However I may be
riots, 505. Asboth, Gen. Alex., 28-9; at Pea Ridge, 30. Ashby, Gen. Turner, killed, 137. , 608. Peach-tree Cr'k, Tenn., 631. Pea Ridge, Ark., 27. Perryville, Ky., 219. Petersburg, el R., pursues Price to Fayetteville, 27; at Pea Ridge, 27 to 31; his report of losses at, 31; adva and 1,000 prisoners at Milford, Mo., 26; at Pea Ridge, 28 to 31; commands a division at Stone Rivet Sanders, 432. McIntosh, Gen., killed at Pea Ridge, 28; 30. McKean, Gen., at Corinth, 225. ol., 2d La., wounded at Port Hudson, 333. Pea Ridge, battle of, 27 to 32; losses at, 31. Pea9. Pike, Gen. Albert, commands Indians at Pea Ridge, 27-33. Pillow, Gen. Gideon J., at Fort DGen. Sterling, 26; abandons Missouri, 27; at Pea Ridge, 28; wounded, 31; allusion to, 35; 67; attacz, retreats from Bentonville, Ark., 27-8; at Pea Ridge, 28-31; succeeds Gen. Fremont, 172; on the Rppi Department. 27; baffled by Sigel, 27; at Pea Ridge, 23-42; attacks Corinth and is defeated, 225[1 more...]