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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 128 14 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 74 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 69 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 22 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Pine Bluff (Arkansas, United States) or search for Pine Bluff (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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le wanted him to do, the latter did not interfere with him, but allowed him full time to abandon the works and evacuate the city. Marmaduke had no alternative but to obey the order he received. He fell back by successive regimental formations, retiring slowly and checking the enemy whenever they attempted to crowd him. After the evacuation of Little Rock the infantry were concentrated at Camp Bragg, near Red river, and the cavalry watched the movements of the enemy at Little Rock and Pine Bluff. The troops were dissatisfied. They confidently expected to fight the Federals at Little Rock and to whip them, and they could not understand why, when General Steele divided his force and took the chance of being beaten in detail, a retreat had been ordered, instead of advantage taken of his hazardous experiment. It has been stated that Colonel Shelby left his sick bed and took command of his brigade as it passed through Little Rock to join Marmaduke in checking the advance of the enem
Shelby's raid through Missouri the fight near Marshall brilliant Exploits of Shelby's command Marmaduke attacks Pine Bluff. The Arkansas river from the Indian country to its mouth was in possession of the Federals, and Shelby decided to goed him as a conquering hero. Late in October General Marmaduke got permission from General Holmes to attack and take Pine Bluff. The place was held by Col. Powell Clayton, a bold and enterprising Federal officer, with probably 1,500 men. Clayton e batteries—aggregating 2,300 men. This force was gradually concentrated at Princeton, nearly midway between Camden and Pine Bluff. By a night march Marmaduke reached Pine Bluff the next morning before seven o'clock. Clayton was taken completely Pine Bluff the next morning before seven o'clock. Clayton was taken completely by surprise, but it was Sunday morning and his troops were in line for inspection. Marmaduke, supposing he would be overawed by superior force, sent in a flag of truce by a staff officer demanding his surrender. Clayton refused to surrender, but th
lby made his headquarters at Princeton, and it was not long before he had the enemy confined closely to Little Rock and Pine Bluff. The belief of a Federal advance soon became a certainty, and there was the excitement of preparation in every command and in his extremity started out another foraging train, about as large as the first and about as strongly guarded, to Pine Bluff for supplies. After the affair at Poison Spring General Smith—who had come up from Shreveport, bringing Parsons' and Cs left Steele in a desperate position. It was evident that he must evacuate Camden and force his way to Little Rock or Pine Bluff, or surrender. He was not disposed to surrender without first making an effort to escape. Shelby wanted Fagan to moveay open for Steele to throw his pontoons across the river and get at least a day's start in the race for Little Rock or Pine Bluff. On the 25th—the day after the capture of his train at Marks' Mill—Steele evacuated Camden. When it was known that he<
action failing for want of support. During Price's defense of Little Rock he commanded the cavalry of the army, which, fighting as the rear guard, was reported as skillfully handled and behaved admirably. At this time occurred his duel with Brig.-Gen. L. M. Walker, which resulted in the death of the latter. Marmaduke was put in arrest, but was ordered to resume command during pending operations, and subsequently was formally released by General Holmes. On October 25, 1863, he attacked Pine Bluff with his division, but without success. At the opening of the Red river campaign, 1864, he held the line of the Ouachita, scouring the country in front to within 25 miles of Little Rock, and when Steele advanced to co-operate with Banks he harassed and delayed the Federal movement from the north to Camden to such an extent as to make it ineffectual, fighting gallantly at Elkin's ferry, April 2d, 3d and 4th, and at Prairie d'ane, April 9th. On the 18th he won the brilliant action at Poiso