Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Hebron, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) or search for Hebron, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nelson, Samuel 1792-1873 (search)
Nelson, Samuel 1792-1873 Jurist; born in Hebron, Washington co., N. Y., Nov. 10, 1792; graduated at Middlebury College in 1813, and admitted to the New York bar in 1817. He was circuit judge in 1823-31; was then appointed an associate justice of the Supreme Court of New York; and was its chief-justice in 1837-45. In the latter year President Tyler appointed him an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court to succeed Judge Smith Thompson. In the famous Dred Scott case (q. v.) he concurred with the decision of Chief-Justice Taney, holding that, if Congress possessed power under the Constitution to abolish slavery, it must necessarily possess the like power to establish it. In 1871 he was a member of the joint high commission on the Alabama claims. Illness compelled him to resign his office in October, 1872. He died in Cooperstown, N. Y., Dec. 13, 1873
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Peters, Samuel Andrew 1735- (search)
Peters, Samuel Andrew 1735- Clergyman; born in Hebron, Conn., Dec. 12, 1735; graduated at Yale College in 1757; became a clergyman of the Church of England; and in 1762 took charge of the Episcopal churches at Hebron and Hartford. He opposed the movements of the patriots; became exceedingly obnoxious to them; and in 1774 was obliged to flee to England. In 1781 he published A General history of Connecticut, which has been characterized as the most unscrupulous and malicious of lying narraHebron and Hartford. He opposed the movements of the patriots; became exceedingly obnoxious to them; and in 1774 was obliged to flee to England. In 1781 he published A General history of Connecticut, which has been characterized as the most unscrupulous and malicious of lying narratives. In it he gave pretended extracts from the blue laws, and the whole narrative shows an independence of time, place, and probabilities. In 1794 he was chosen bishop of Vermont, but was never consecrated. In 1805 he returned to the United States, and towards the latter years of his life he lived in obscurity in New York City, where he died, April 19, 1826.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trumbull, Benjamin 1735-1820 (search)
Trumbull, Benjamin 1735-1820 Historian; born in Hebron, Conn., Dec. 19, 1735; graduated at Yale College in 1759, and studied theology under Rev. Eleazer Wheelock; pastor in North Haven for nearly sixty years. His publications include General history of the United States of America; Complete history of Connecticut from 1630 till 1713 (2 volumes). He died in North Haven, Conn., Feb. 2, 1820.