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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
lough's Brigade, Garrison of Alexandria, Va., 22nd Army Corps, to April, 1863. Ferry's 1st Brigade, Corcoran's 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1863. New York, Dept. of the East, to October, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1865. Service. Provost duty at Alexandria, Va., till April 20, 1863. Ordered to Suffolk, Va., April 20. Siege of Suffolk, Va., April 22-May 4. Siege of Suffolk raised May 4. Windsor May 23. Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 8. Expedition to Bottom's Bridge July 1-7. Ordered to New York City July 12. Duty there and at Fort Richmond, N. Y. Harbor, July 14 to October 13. Ordered to join Army of the Potomac in the field. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 4-June 15. Battles of the Wilder
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
Duty in the Shenandoah Valley till April, 1865. Expedition from Winchester into Fauquier and Loudoun Counties November 28-December 3, 1864. Expedition to Gordonsville December 19-28. Moved to Washington, D. C., April, 1865, and duty in the defenses of that city till July. Mustered out July 8, 1865. Battery lost during service 8 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 9 Enlisted men by disease. Total 17. 7th New York Independent Battery Light Artillery Organized at Windsor as an Artillery Company for the 56th Regiment Infantry, and mustered in October 30, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., November 7, 1861. Designated 7th Independent Battery December 7, 1861. Attached to Casey's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1862. Artillery, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, to September, 1862. Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1863
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
oleman, James 20, sin.; farmer; Adrian, Mich. 9 Apl 63; 13 May 64 Davids Id, N. Y; dis. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Dead. Coleman, John 19, mar.; farmer; Adrian, Mich. 9 Apl 63; 20 Aug 65. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Conaway, Shedrick Sergt. 19, sin.; waiter; Cleveland, O. 14 Apl 63; 20 Augt. 65. $50. Cleveland, O. cook, William 22, mar; brickmaker; Huntingdon, Pa. 9 Apl 63; missing 21 Feb 64. Left sick at Barber's Fork, Fla. $50. Cooper, George 23, sin.; farmer; Windsor, Can. 9 Apl 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Cummings, Aaron. 22, mar.; farmer; York Co. Pa. 12 Apl. 63; 20 Aug 65. Wounded 20 Feb 64 Olustee, Fla. $50. Cunningham, William A. 20, sin.; boatman; Montgomery, N. Y. 9 Apl 63; 20 Aug 65. Wounded 20 Feb 64 Olustee, Fla. $50. Curry, Josephus 20, sin.; farmer; Washington, Pa. 12 May 63; killed 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Dandridge, James 26, sin.; waiter; Winchester, Va. 8 Jly 64.; 20 Aug 65.. David, Anthony 26, sin.; cook; Jackson, La. 14 Apl 6
, with orders to threaten Augusta, but not to be drawn needlessly into a serious battle. This he skilfully accomplished, skirmishing heavily with Wheeler's cavalry, first at Blackville and afterward at Williston and Aiken. General Williams, with two divisions of the Twentieth corps, marched to the South Carolina railroad at Graham Station on the eighth, and General Slocum reached Blackville on the tenth. The destruction of the railroad was continued by the left wing from Blackville up to Windsor. By the eleventh of February all the army was on the railroad from Midway to Johnson's station, thereby dividing the enemy's forces, which still remained at Branchville and Charlestonon the one hand, Aiken and Augusta on the other. We then began the movement on Orangeburg. The Seventeenth corps crossed the south fork of Edisto river at Binnaker's bridge and moved straight for Orangeburg, while the Fifteenth corps crossed at Holman's bridge and moved to Poplar Springs in support. The l
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
ss, or the diffusion of correct principles of political economy, all the evils of the age would peacefully be rectified — in a century or two! He died in 1633. Peter Brown, the second, was born in 1632. A monument in the churchyard of Windsor, Connecticut, is his only biography. It tells us that he married Mary Gillett in 1658, and died October 16, 1692. He had four boys: the second-born named John Brown; who, in his turn, married Elizabeth Loomis in 1692, had eight daughters and thmarriage, remained a spinster till her death at the age of one hundred. John, the third, was born November 4, 1728; married Hannah Owen in 1758; John Owen, the ancestor of Hannah, was a native of Wales. He was among the first settlers of Windsor, where he was married in 1650. was the father of John, Frederick, Owen, and Abiel Brown; and the honored grandfather of Captain John Brown, the hero of Kansas and Harper's Ferry. John Brown, the third, at the outbreak of the revolutionary war,
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: the child and his ancestors. (search)
ss, or the diffusion of correct principles of political economy, all the evils of the age would peacefully be rectified — in a century or two! He died in 1633. Peter Brown, the second, was born in 1632. A monument in the churchyard of Windsor, Connecticut, is his only biography. It tells us that he married Mary Gillett in 1658, and died October 16, 1692. He had four boys: the second-born named John Brown; who, in his turn, married Elizabeth Loomis in 1692, had eight daughters and thmarriage, remained a spinster till her death at the age of one hundred. John, the third, was born November 4, 1728; married Hannah Owen in 1758; John Owen, the ancestor of Hannah, was a native of Wales. He was among the first settlers of Windsor, where he was married in 1650. was the father of John, Frederick, Owen, and Abiel Brown; and the honored grandfather of Captain John Brown, the hero of Kansas and Harper's Ferry. John Brown, the third, at the outbreak of the revolutionary war,
er, Mary, sister of H. B. S., 1; married, 55; letter to, 61; accompanies sister to Europe, 269; letters from H. B. S. to, on love for New England, 61; on visit to Windsor, 235. Beecher, Roxanna Foote, mother of H. B. S., 1; her death, 2; strong, sympathetic nature, 2; reverence for the Sabbath, 3; sickness, death, and funeral, 4oir4e, 219; meets English celebrities at Lord Mayor's dinner in London, 226; meets English nobility, 229; Stafford House, 232; breakfast at Lord Trevelyan's, 234; Windsor, 235; presentation of bracelet, 233; of inkstand, 240; Paris, first visit to, 241 ; en route for Switzerland, 243; Geneva and Chillon, 244; Grindelwald to Meyring61; letter to H. B. S. from, on Uncle Tom's Cabin, 162; on Pearl of Orr's Island, 327; on Minister's Wooing, 327; poem on H. B. S.'s. seventieth birthday, 502. Windsor, visit to, 235. Womanhood. true, H. B. S. on intellect versus heart, 475. Woman's rights, H. W. Beecher, advocate of, 478. Women of America, Appeal from
29. West Field, 4. Wethersfield, Conn., founded, 6. Whalley, the regicide, 11. Wharton, Francis, 68. White, Daniel, Charity, 277, 320. Whitefield, George, preaches on the Common, 13, 48; a friend to the college, 236. Whitefield tree, 48. Willard, Emery, the village strong man, 40. William H. Smart Post 30, 288. Williams, Rev. Mr., 73. Willson, Forceythe, 68. Wilson, John, Sr., 334. Wilson, Rev. John, election speech of, 7, 48. Windmill Hill, 3. Windsor, Conn., founded, 6. Winlock, Professor, 75. Winship, Mrs. Joanna, tomb of, 189. Winthrop, John, 1, 2, 7, 47. Winthrop, Prof. John, 72, 73. Winthrop Square, 5. Wires, Inspectors of, and Superintendent of Lamps, 404. Witchcraft, 11, 12. Wollaston, Mount, Thomas Hooker's company settle at, 6, 233. Wolves, bounties for, 9. Worcester becomes a city, 54. Worcester, Joseph E., lexicographer, 68. Worthington Street, 116. Wright, Elizur, description of London parks
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Edwards (search)
Edwards's early years. his marriage. his journal. his love of God. his preaching. the great Awakening. narrative of surprising Conversions. thoughts on the revival of religion. marks of a work of the true spirit. treatise concerning religious affections. the quarrel with the Northampton congregation. Stockbridge. President of the College of New Jersey. death. the relations of Edwards to the deistic controversy. the freedom of the will Jonathan Edwards was born at Windsor, Connecticut, in 1703. He belonged, unlike his great contemporary Franklin in this, to the Brahmin families of America, his father being a distinguished graduate of Harvard and a minister of high standing, his mother being the daughter of Solomon Stoddard, a revered pastor of Northampton, Massachusetts, and a religious author of repute. Jonathan, one of eleven children, showed extraordinary precocity. There is preserved a letter of his, written apparently in his twelfth year, in which he retort
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 2: the Worcester period (search)
r as eye could reach. Some log huts held Irish apparently, and some negroes; others of the latter were driving wood-sleds, or sawing at the stations. All looked hale and well dressed. My heart bounded when we came out of the trees on a vast level plain, with the withered grass appearing through the snow, and a snow-storm driving across it --reminding me of Sarah Clarke's brown etchings. They tell me since that it was not a prairie, but it was as good as one to me. At last we got to Windsor, where the ferry-boat was slowly toiling through the ice, and I preferred, with many others, to walk across, carpetbag in hand, and thus I reached Detroit at 3 P. M. January, 1860 Dearest Mother: I have not written very punctually, but it is from wandering up and down the world lecturing. ... I enjoyed Hartford. . . . There I saw Rose Terry. She lives in a sort of moated grange a mile out of town, an old house with an air of decay, once lovely among its fields and shrubbery, now mo
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