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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 21 1 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 18, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 17: Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
Mary's River, five miles from the railway junction, he had a sharp skirmish, and drove the Confederates, but with a loss to himself of seventeen men. He reached Sanderson, forty miles from Jacksonville, at six o'clock in the evening, where he captured and destroyed much property; and, pushing on, he was almost to Alligator or Lakerongly posted across his path, that he thought it prudent to fall back about five miles. There he halted in a drenching rain, and telegraphed to Seymour, then at Sanderson, for food and orders. He was afterward informed that Finnegan, with three thousand men, fell back to Lake City and beyond, that night. Gillmore did not tarryion of Florida. And such was the latter's intention when Gillmore left; and on the 12th he telegraphed to his superior that he had ordered Henry to fall back to Sanderson. To this Gillmore replied, I want your command at and beyond Baldwin concentrated at Baldwin without delay. Seymour demurred, alleging that to leave the south
. M., and was in Baldwin at 7; capturing another gun, three cars, and $500,000 worth of provisions and munitions. He had a skirmish at the south fork of St. Mary's, 5 miles farther on, and drove the enemy, but lost 17 men. At (P. M., he was in Sanderson, 40 miles from Jacksonville; where he captured and destroyed much property; pushing on, at 2 A. M., very nearly to Lake City, almost half way from the coast to Tallahassee; but here, at 11 A. M., he found Finnegan in position, very stubborn, and too strong to be moved: so he fell back 5 miles, bivouacked in a drenching rain, and telegraphed to Seymour, now at Sanderson with part of his infantry, for orders and food. It was reported that Finnegan, though he had 3,000 men, fell back from Lake City that night. Whether he did so or not, the belief that he did probably misled Seymour into his great blunder thereafter. Gillmore had followed his lieutenant down to Jacksonville and out so far as Baldwin; Feb. 9. returning directly to
  F 1 19 20 1 11 12 224   G   17 17   15 15 227   H 1 22 23   16 16 206   I 2 10 12   11 11 205   K 2 35 37   10 10 209 Totals 18 218 236 2 131 133 2,173 236 killed==10.8 per cent. Wounded in addition to the above, 623; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 44. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Bluffton, S. C. 1 Cold Harbor, Va. 17 Morris Island, S. C. 8 Petersburg Mine, Va. 11 Fort Wagner, S. C. 83 Petersburg Trenches, Va. 10 Sanderson, Fla. 1 Deep Bottom, Va. 6 Olustee, Fla. 47 Strawberry Plains, Va., August 16, 1864 10 On Picket, Fla. 1 Hatcher's Run, Va. 2 Chester Heights, Va. 7 Fort Fisher, N. C. 4 Drewry's Bluff, Va. 22 Wilmington, N. C. 4 Bermuda Hundred, Va. 1 By Prison Guard 1 Present, also, at Fort Pulaski; Tybee Island; Skull Creek; Coosahatchie River; Proctor's Creek.; Chaffin's Farm; Darbytown Road; Fair Oaks (1864); Fort Anderson. notes.--Organized and commanded by Rev. James H. Perry
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
one P. M., we moved forward, and arrived at Sanderson at six P. M. Sanderson is a village a littleSanderson is a village a little larger than Baldwin, a railroad station, and distant from Jacksonville forty miles. The rebels had the burning buildings afforded sufficient. Sanderson was the centre to which all the forage and pr the State was forwarded. We remained at Sanderson till two A. M. the next morning, and then sta message to General Seymour, who Was now at Sanderson, asking for further orders. He was firm in was in getting provisions to the troops. At Sanderson the troops were forty miles away from their ally resolved that Henry should fall back to Sanderson. To that point several regiments of infantr Friday while following a negro soldier from Sanderson. A courier, going from Camp Finnigan to Jacn the command. I heard a woman tell one, at Sanderson, that he would be surely hung if the rebels eral Seymour ordered to be burned just above Sanderson, are the only breaks between Jacksonville an
th, a portion of our forces were sent toward Sanderson, and I returned to Jacksonvillle. Telegraphulse, on advancing on Lake City, but to hold Sanderson, unless there were reasons for falling back repulse in advancing on Lake City, but hold Sanderson unless there are reasons for falling back whnce meets serious opposition, concentrate at Sanderson and the South-Fork of the St. Mary's, and ifosal. But nothing is visible this side of Sanderson. Saddles, etc., for mounting the Seventh Nerch from Barber's, our troops passed through Sanderson at about noon. At this place they did not h his mind. And when, about six miles beyond Sanderson, the rebel pickets were driven in, no preparOlustee, a railroad station ten miles beyond Sanderson. The railroad intersected their position. n the breast, and was left on the retreat at Sanderson, to be treated by the rebels. Second Lieutecure order and rally fugitives. Arriving at Sanderson about nine o'clock in the evening, he found [5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Ocean Pond, Florida. (search)
y, and skirmished heavily with my advanced line. Discovering my position and its strength, and probably presuming my force larger than it was, they retreated to Sanderson, thence to Barber's, on the east bank of the St. Mary's, where they constructed field works, and concentrated their whole force for a final movement on Lake Citygave way entirely, and were closely pressed for three miles, until nightfall. I directed Brigadier-General Colquitt to continue the pursuit, intending to occupy Sanderson that night, but in deference to his suggestion of the fatigue of the troops, the absence of rations, and the disadvantages of the pursuit in the dark, and in conadier-General. Captain Call, Assistant Adjutant-General. Report of Colonel Geo. P. Harrison, Jr.Headquarters Second brigade, A. E. T., in the field, near Sanderson, Florida, 22d February, 1864. Captain,--I have the honor to submit the following report of my command in the engagement with the abolitionists near Ocean Pond on
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
mits the unexecuted part of the sentence disqualifying Gen. Fitz-John Porter......May 4, 1882 Immigration of Chinese laborers to the United States suspended for ten years, and admission of Chinese to citizenship prohibited by act of......May 6, 1882 Lieut. James B. Lockwood and Sergeant Brainard of the Greely expedition reach lat. 83° 23′ 8″ N.......May 13, 1882 Bill to appoint a tariff commission approved......May 15, 1882 New indictment in the star-route trial presented, with Sanderson's name omitted......May 20, 1882 Lieutenant Danenhower, Dr. Newcomb, Cole, and Long Sing, part of the survivors of the Jeannette, arrive in New York......May 28, 1882 Deadlock in the House of Representatives begins May 25, over contested election of E. M. Mackey, of South Carolina, v. Samuel Diddle; the former finally seated.......May 31, 1882 New star-route trial begins......June 1, 1882 Guiteau executed at Washington, D. C.......June 30, 1882 Tariff commission meets at Was
8th. General Finegan, with his well-known energy, immediately issued all necessary orders for the concentration of his scattered troops, and lost no time in notifying General Beauregard of the emergency. From Jacksonville the enemy, unhindered, pressed on to Baldwin; then to Barber's; then to Sanderson, and was, on the 11th, within three miles of Lake City. There his progress was checked by a force composed of about 450 infantry, 100 cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. He fell back to Sanderson, and thence to Barber's, on the east bank of the St. Mary's, where he evidently intended to concentrate before moving on Lake City. In the mean time General Finegan, with all the reinforcements he had thus far been able to procure, had marched to Ocean Pond, on the Olustee River, and, on the 13th, with not more than 2000 men of all arms, resolutely awaited the enemy's advance. Several days of anxious suspense were thus passed, during which, to the great relief of all, the following t
fantry and five pieces of artillery. Here they opened upon us, fighting as infantry, and skirmished heavily with my advanced line. Discovering my position and its strength, and probably presuming my force larger than it was, they retreated to Sanderson, thence to Barber's, on the east bank of the St. Mary's, where they constructed field-works, and concentrated their whole force for a final movement on Lake City. In the mean time I used every possible effort to gather reinforcements, and ons and three 10-pounder Parrott guns, and one set of colors captured from them, they gave way entirely, and were closely pressed for three miles until nightfall. I directed Brigadier-General Colquitt to continue the pursuit, intending to occupy Sanderson that night; but, in deference to his suggestion of the fatigue of the troops, the absence of rations, and the disadvantages of the pursuit in the dark, and in consequence of a report from an advance cavalry picket that the enemy had halted for
nry resumed the advance at 1 P. M., entering Sanderson three hours later. Gen. Joseph Finegan, theBarber's at midnight on the 10th. Henry, at Sanderson, rested until 2 A. M. on the 11th, when he a strong, defensive line. Seymour arrived at Sanderson with Barton's brigade on the evening of the to risk a repulse at Lake City, but to hold Sanderson and the south fork of the St. Mary's. Seymoung two thousand men, he moved forward toward Sanderson, taking post at Olustee, where he constructewere little heeded. Near an old mill beyond Sanderson, Henry's men came upon a few cavalry of the Swails, wounded in the head, set out toward Sanderson, but soon fell exhausted beside the road, unendorf, Forty-eighth New York, there; and at Sanderson some twenty-three more remained. Moving toward Sanderson, the narrow road was choked with a flowing torrent of soldiers on foot, wounded and uction, ordered Colquitt to pursue and occupy Sanderson. Colquitt representing that his men were fa
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