hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 71 results in 21 document sections:

1 2 3
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ved back to Conyers, where, learning that General Stoneman had gone to Covington and south on the east side of the Ocmulgee, he returned and resumed his position on our left. It is known that General Stoneman kept to the east of the Ocmulgee to Clinton, sending detachments off to the east, which did a large amount of damage to the railroad, burning the bridges of Walnut Creek and Oconee, and destroying a large number of cars and locomotives, and with his main force appeared before Macon. He doga and drove him off. He then passed up into East Tennessee and made quite a stay at Athens, but on the first show of pursuit he kept on north across the Little Tennessee, and crossing the Holston near Strawberry Plains, reached the Clinch near Clinton, and passed over toward Sequatchie and McMinnville. Thence he seems to have gone to Murfreesborough and Lebanon, and across to Franklin. He may have committed damage to the property of citizens, but has injured us but little, the railroads bei
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
n time, Wheeler, who, as we have seen, had struck the railway at Calhoun, See page 391. had swept around so as. to avoid the National forces at Allatoona, and appeared before Dalton and demanded its surrender. The little garrison there, under Colonel Liebold, held the post firmly until General Steedman came down from Chattanooga and drove Wheeler off. The latter then pushed up into East Tennessee, made a circuit around Knoxville by way of Strawberry Plains, crossed the Clinch River near Clinton, went over the Cumberland Mountains by way of the Sequatchie, and appeared at McMinnville, Murfreesboroa, and Lebanon. Rousseau, Steedman, and Granger, in Tennessee, were on the alert, and they soon drove the raider into Northern Alabama by way of Florence. Although he had destroyed much property, his damage to Sherman's communications was so slight, that the latter said, in writing from Atlanta on the 15th of September: 1864. Our roads and telegraphs are all repaired, and the cars run w
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
. At East Point he met some of Wheeler's cavalry, which Hood had left behind to operate Against Sherman. These were attacked and driven across the Flint River. Kilpatarick crossed that stream at Jonesboroa, and pursued them to Lovejoy, where Murray's brigade, dismounted, expelled them from intrenchments, captured the works, took fifty prisoners, and, in the pursuit, Atkins's brigade seized and held two of their guns. Pressing forward, Kilpatrick went through Macdonough and Monticello to Clinton, and then made a dash upon Macon, driving in some of Wheeler's cavalry there, threatening the strongly-manned works, burning a train of cars, tearing up the railway, and spreading the greatest consternation over that region. By this time the Confederates began to comprehend the grand object of Sherman's movement, but could not determine his final destination. The evident danger to Georgia and the Carolinas caused the most frantic appeals to be made to the people of the former State. Ar
ither side were about 100. Wheeler, after breaking the railroad at Calhoun, as already narrated, appeared before Dalton, which he summoned ; but Col. Leibold held it firmly till Gen. Steedman arrived from Chattanooga and drove the Rebels off. Wheeler now pushed up into East Tennessee, halting at Athens; whence, on being menaced, he dashed eastward across the Little Tennessee, and thence across the Holston at Strawberry plains; and so, circling around Knoxville, he crossed the Clinch near Clinton, and the Cumberland mountains, by Sequatchie, MeMinnville, Murfreesborough, and Lebanon, whence he was chased southward across the Tennessee near Florence into Alabama. He destroyed much property during this extensive raid; but his operations had little influence on the results of the campaign. Hardee, moving to his right, formed a junction with Hood near Jonesboroa, and their army was soon considerably reenforced : Jefferson Davis hastening from Richmond to Georgia, visiting the army
, he had been confronted at East Point by Rebel cavalry; with whom he skirmished, driving them to Flint river, which he crossed at Jonesboroa at 7 A. M. next day; following the enemy to Lovejoy's, where they had taken post in the old Rebel works, having two guns. Dismounting Murray's brigade, Kilpatrick attacked and carried the works, capturing 50 prisoners; Atkins's brigade soon after charging the fleeing foe, and taking their guns. Kilpatrick pushed thence by McDonough and Monticello to Clinton; whence he made a dash at Macon, driving in the enemy's cavalry; but was unable to carry the defenses, which were held by infantry and artillery. He burned a train of cars, and broke up the railroad; covering all the roads which diverged eastward from Macon, by the aid of Wolcott's brigade of infantry, which was sharply assailed from Macon, but worsted and beat off its assailants; while the right wing marched by to Gordon. Howard now advanced Nov. 24-5. to the Oconee at Ball's ferry,
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
ok, and Kilpatrick. Stoneman had not obeyed his orders to attack the railroad first before going to Macon and Andersonville, but had crossed the Ocmulgee River high up near Covington, and had gone down that river on the east bank. He reached Clinton, and sent out detachments which struck the railroad leading from Macon to Savannah at Griswold Station, where they found and destroyed seventeen locomotives and over a hundred cars; then went on and burned the bridge across the Oconee, and reunited the division before Macon. Stoneman shelled the town across the river, but could not cross over by the bridge, and returned to Clinton, where he found his retreat obstructed, as he supposed, by a superior force. There he became bewildered, and sacrificed himself for the safety of his command. He occupied the attention of his enemy by a small force of seven hundred men, giving Colonels Adams and Capron leave, with their brigades, to cut their way back to me at Atlanta. The former reached
might be destroyed. After pushing well in on Forsyth, and being convinced that the impression was made upon the enemy that our forces were moving directly on that point, I rapidly marched to Planters' Factory, crossed the Ocmulgee, and reached Clinton November nineteenth. Learning that a portion of Wheeler's cavalry had also crossed the river, and was now in my immediate front, I moved on the road to the city; forced back Wheeler's cavalry across Walnut Creek; charged and carried a portion othe enemy was driven by him beyond Griswold Station. The same day Colonel Atkins (Second brigade) had some severe fighting on the Macon and Milledgeville road, and effectually prevented any attack upon our trains, that were this day moving from Clinton to Gordon. November 24. My command marched to Milledgeville and crossed the Oconee. Having met the General-in-Chief the day previous at Milledgeville, and received instructions from him to move rapidly in direction of Millen, and, if poss
November 22. Wheeler advanced with his entire corps of cavalry and three (3) brigades of infantry, drove in my pickets and skirmish line, but was finally checked and driven back by the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry (Colonel Jordon) and Fifth Kentucky cavalry, (Colonel Baldwin,) the sabre being principally used. General Wolcott with his infantry now came up, and the enemy was driven by him beyond Griswold Station. The same day Colonel Atkins (Second brigade) had some severe fighting on the Macon and Milledgeville road, and effectually prevented any attack upon our trains, that were this day moving from Clinton to Gordon.
e hundred men of the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, at Clinton, with orders to take a road leading to Macon, to thon. On the twentieth, we moved toward Macon, (from Clinton.) Late in the evening we participated in a demonstrulgee on pontoon, and marched thirty miles, to Clinton, Georgia. 20th. Moved from Clinton at twelve M., myClinton at twelve M., my brigade in the advance. The Ninety-Second Illinois mounted infantry volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Van Buskirildings, and destroy the railroad. Starting from Clinton, he found the enemy picketing the roads. Avoiding the Ocmulgee and marched thirty-two (32) miles, to Clinton. This day's march killed ten (10) horses. On thgiment was ordered to make a sabre-charge along the Clinton and Macon road, and from which the enemy were then ng the Ocmulgee, passed through Hillsboro and on to Clinton; arrived at three P. M., and encamped. During the three captured. The remainder of the regiment left Clinton, and marched to within three (3) miles of Macon, an
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Georgia, 1864 (search)
23d, 24th, 27th and 28th Infantry. KAN-1st and 11th Cavalry. MICHIGAN--8th Cavalry. OHIO--7th Cavalry (Co. "D"); McLaughlin's Squadron Cavalry. July 30: Combat, ClintonILLINOIS--14th Cavalry. INDIANA--5th and 6th Cavalry; 24th Indpt. Battery Light Arty. KENTUCKY--1st and 11th Cavalry. MICHIGAN--8th Cavalry. OHIO--7th Cavalry (Co.o Reports.) Nov. 17: Skirmish, Towallga BridgeKENTUCKY--5th Cavalry. Nov. 19: Skirmish, Buckhead Station(Detachment 2d Div. 20th Corps.) Nov. 20: Skirmish near ClintonILLINOIS--92d Mounted Infantry. WISCONSIN--10th Indpt. Battery Light Arty. Nov. 20: Skirmish, Walnut CreekILLINOIS--92d Mounted Infantry. MICHIGAN--9th Cavalry. OILLINOIS--92d Mounted Infantry. Nov. 21: Skirmish, GordonPENNSYLVANIA--9th Cavalry. Nov. 21: Skirmish near EatontonOHIO--61st Infantry. Nov. 21-23: Skirmishes, ClintonILLINOIS--55th, 116th and 127th Infantry. MICHIGAN--15th Infantry. MISSOURI--6th and 8th Infantry. OHIO--30th and 57th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--9th Cavalry. Nov. 2
1 2 3