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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,121 1 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 334 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 68 40 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 52 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 36 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 24 24 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 21 1 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's campaign in Georgia-siege of Atlanta --death of General McPherson-attempt to capture Andersonville-capture of Atlanta (search)
ks were spent at some; and about Atlanta more than a month was consumed. It was the 23d of May before the road was finished up to the rear of Sherman's army and the pursuit renewed. This pursuit brought him up to the vicinity of Allatoona. This place was very strongly intrenched, and naturally a very defensible position. An assault upon it was not thought of, but preparations were made to flank the enemy out of it. This was done by sending a large force around our right, by the way of Dallas, to reach the rear of the enemy. Before reaching there, however, they found the enemy fortified in their way, and there resulted hard fighting for about a week at a place called New Hope Church. On the left our troops also were fortified, and as close up to the enemy as they could get. They kept working still farther around to the left toward the railroad. This was the case more particularly with the cavalry. By the 4th of June Johnston found that he was being hemmed in so rapidly that h
his military judgment, and that his proposition could have been successfully executed. From Adairsville the Union forces marched to Kingston and Dallas, where, in a severe engagement against Hardee's veteran corps, General Logan was shot through the arm about half-way between the elbow and the shoulder. They seemed determined to deprive him of his left arm, as he had been shot through that arm at the point of the shoulder at Fort Donelson. He paid little attention to the wound received at Dallas, feeling that there was no time to be off duty for a single hour. General Logan always claimed that Dallas, for the length of time and number of troops engaged, was one of the most hotly contested battles of the war. The attack of the Fifteenth Corps on Kenesaw Mountain, up its perpendicular sides, was one of the most daring and tragic in history. It was made in obedience to orders against the advice of General Logan, who considered the impossible feat little short of madness, an opinion
again the enemy's destructive fire, and shared with your comrades of the Army of the Cumberland the glories of a victory than which no soldier can boast a prouder. In that unexampled campaign of vigilant and vigorous warfare from Chattanooga to Atlanta you freshened your laurels at Resaca, grappling with the enemy behind his works, hurling him back dismayed and broken. Pursuing him from thence, marking your path by the graves of fallen comrades, you again triumphed over superior numbers at Dallas, fighting your way from there to Kenesaw Mountain and under the murderous artillery that frowned from its rugged heights; with a tenacity and constancy that finds few parallels you labored, fought, and suffered through the boiling rays of a southern midsummer sun, until at last you planted your colors upon its topmost heights. Again, on the 22d of July, 1864, rendered memorable through all time for the terrible struggle you so heroically maintained under discouraging disasters and that sadd
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
s and artillery and its valuable mills and foundries. General Sherman having given his army a few days' rest at this point, again put it in motion on the 23d for Dallas, with a view of turning the difficult pass at Allatoona. On the afternoon of the 25th the advance, under General Hooker, had a severe battle with the enemy, driving him back to New Hope Church, near Dallas. Several sharp encounters occurred at this point. The most important was on the 28th, when the enemy assaulted General Mc- Pherson at Dallas, but received a terrible and bloody repulse. On the 4th of June Johnston abandoned his intrenched position at New Hope Church and retreated Dallas, but received a terrible and bloody repulse. On the 4th of June Johnston abandoned his intrenched position at New Hope Church and retreated to the strong positions of Kenesaw, Pine, and Lost Mountains. He was forced to yield the two last-named places and concentrate his army on Kenesaw, where, on the 27th, Generals Thomas and McPherson made a determined but unsuccessful assault. On the night of the 2d of July Sherman commenced moving his army by the right flank, and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
ingston. Combats near Cassville. May 20, 1864.Skirmish'at Etowah River, near Cartersville. May 23, 1864.Action at Stilesborough. May 24, 1864.Skirmishes at Cass Station and Cassville. Skirmish at Burnt Hickory (or Huntsville). Skirmish near Dallas. May 25-June 5, 1864.Operations on the line of Pumpkin Vine Creek, with combats at New Hope Church, Pickett's Mills, and other points. May 26-June 1, 1864.Combats at and about Dallas. May 27, 1864.Skirmish at Pond Springs, Ala. May 29, 1864.ADallas. May 27, 1864.Skirmish at Pond Springs, Ala. May 29, 1864.Action at Moulton, Ala. June 9, 1864.Skirmishes near Big Shanty and near Stilesborough. June 10, 1864.Skirmish at Calhoun. June 10-July 3, 1864.Operations about Marietta, with combats at Pine Hill, Lost Mountain, Brush Mountain, Gilgal Church, Noonday Creek, McAfee's Cross-Roads, Kenesaw Mountain, Powder Springs, Cheney's Farm, Kolb's Farm, Olley's Creek, Nickajack Creek, Noyes' Creek, and other points. June 24, 1864.Action at La Fayette. July 4, 1864.Skirmishes at Ruff's Mill, Neal Dow Sta
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
Euharlee, Stilesborough, and Burnt Hickory on Dallas; General Schofield to cross the Etowah higher road, beginning about two miles northeast of Dallas and extending full five miles. As soon as the General McPherson was ordered to draw off from Dallas and move up six miles and replace General Hookton, and on the 23d put the army in motion for Dallas. General McPherson crossed the Etowah at the l Davis' division moved directly from Rome for Dallas via Van Wert. General Thomas took the road vineral Thomas was moving from Burnt Hickory for Dallas, his troops on three roads, General Hooker havof the presence of the enemy, led him north of Dallas about four miles. It was near 4 p. m. before Gubstantially in front of the road leading from Dallas to Marietta. We were consequently compelled tenemy made a bold and daring assault on him at Dallas. Fortunately our men had erected good breast-pe for him to repeat them after the example of Dallas and the Kolb House, and upon studying the grou[7 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
Army of the Cumberland, In the Field, near Dallas, Ga., June 5, 1864. Colonel: I have the honorarmy at daylight on the morning of the 23d on Dallas, by Euharlee and Stilesborough; the division om General McPherson's army, to march direct on Dallas, by way of Van Wert. The advance guard of Mc-g that Johnston was moving in the direction of Dallas and Powder Springs. General Garrard, commandin on Pumpkin Vine Creek, about three miles from Dallas, and that in moving on that place, and when wid repulsed this force and drove it back toward Dallas. On the 25th the First Division of Cavalryoker's command advanced on the road leading to Dallas running south of the one used by Butterfield'snessee), was sent by General Palmer to move on Dallas by the most direct road from where he then wasnd covering the road leading from Allatoona to Dallas, via New Hope Church. There was light skirmishort and warm contest. General Davis occupied Dallas with his division on the afternoon of the 27th[1 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 12 (search)
oga. At Resaca I was prostrated by fever and compelled to return to Chattanooga, where I remained until the actions near Dallas occurred, when I went to Kingston, and received the wounded and sick from the front, had them transferred to the rear, anin charge of the Twentieth Corps, resigned in the latter part of May and left when the army was in the neighborhood of Dallas, Ga. About the middle of June Surgs. C. W. Jones, U. S. Volunteers, and John W. Foye, U. S. Volunteers, were, respectivelyil they were in condition to be conveyed in the hospital train to the hospitals at the rear. After the first action near Dallas, the wounded were brought in wagons to Kingston and thence by rail to Chattanooga. Those wounded in the last action near Dallas were brought in wagons to Acworth, where temporary hospitals were improvised until the bridge over the Etowah River was rebuilt, when the wounded were carried in freight cars to the rear. The wounded from the various assaults and skirmishes
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
enewed its supplies, sent back everything surplus, and made other preparations for a movement on Dallas. May 23, crossed the Etowah River at Gillem's Bridge and went into position at Euharlee Cree by a settlement road, making a detour to the right of Burnt Hickory, and expecting to come into Dallas by a Van Wert and Dallas road. This route was taken to avoid collision with the numerous wagons nant-Colonel Mendenhall, department inspector-general, met me at a point six or seven miles from Dallas, bringing an order from General Thomas for me to move by the first left-hand road across to the ls Stanley and Newton, while he was making a regular assault upon General McPherson's lines near Dallas. The enemy was repulsed at every point. May 29, very little of interest occurred during thee at 11 p. m., which his troops handsomely repulsed. Heavy firing was heard in the direction of Dallas a little later, whereupon a strong demonstration by artillery and musketry firing was made by St
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 17 (search)
the Army of the Cumberland at that point. From that time until the 7th of the present month it was engaged in a series of skirmishes and battles, the most prominent of which are Tunnel Hill, Buzzard Roost, Resaca, Calhoun, Adairsville, Kingston, Dallas, Kenesaw, and Atlanta. The system of brigade hospitals was abolished at the outset of the campaign, and that of division hospitals established, as by Circular No. 4, of March 25, 1863, from the Surgeon-General's Office. This system, with a fthe surgeons in charge, with energy and ability. Operations were primary, and every possible attention and care given to the patients. Medical and commissary supplies were abundant, except during the three weeks that the army was in front of Dallas, or New Hope Church, and far distant from the depot of supplies. However, although at that time they were not abundant, yet they proved sufficient, and at no time have patients suffered from the want of such supplies. All wounded and serious
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