Your search returned 85 results in 31 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Camp fires of the boys in Gray. (search)
t will be the result. He arranges for every possible and impossible contingency, and brings the war to a favorable and early termination. The greatest mistake General Lee ever made, was that he failed to consult this man. Who can tell what might have been if he had. Now, to the consternation of all hands, our old friend, the Bore, familiarly known as the old Auger, opens his mouth to tell us of a little incident illustrative of his personal prowess, and, by way of preface, commences at Eden and goes laboriously through the Patriarchal age, on through the Mosaic dispensation to the Christian era, takes in Grecian and Roman history, by the way, then Spain and Germany and England and colonial times, and the early history of our grand Republic; the causes of and necessity for our war, and a complete history up to date. And then slowly unfolds the little matter. We always loved to hear this man, and prided ourselves on being the only mess in the army having such treasure all our ow
to take of history. If we expect to know Lincoln thoroughly we must be prepared to take him as he really was. In 1826 Abe's sister Sarah was married to Aaron Gigsby, and at the wedding the Lincoln family sang a song composed in honor of the event by Abe himself. It is a tiresome doggerel and full of painful rhymes. I reproduce it here from the manuscript furnished me by Mrs. Crawford. The author and composer called it Adam and eve's wedding song. When Adam was created He dwelt in Eden's shade, As Moses has recorded, And soon a bride was made. Ten thousand times ten thousand Of creatures swarmed around Before a bride was formed, And yet no mate was found. The Lord then was not willing That man should be alone, But caused a sleep upon him, And from him took a bone. And closed the flesh instead thereof, And then he took the same And of it made a woman, And brought her to the man. Then Adam he rejoiced To see his loving bride A part of his own body, The product of his side.
of this bright host, A spirit of a different-aspect waved His wings, like thunder-clouds above some coast, Whose barren beach with frequent wrecks is paved. His brow was like the deep when tempest-tost; Fierce and unfathomable thoughts engraved Eternal wrath on his immortal face, And where he gazed, a gloom pervaded space. Yes, in the moment of our country's triumph, in the plenitude of its pride, in the hey-day of its hope, and in the fulness of its beauty, the serpent which crawled into Eden, and whispered his glozing story of delusion to the unsuspecting victim of his guile, unable to rise from the original curse which rests upon him, sought to coil his snaky folds around it and sting it to the heart. From the arts and the enjoyments of peace we have been plunged deep in the horrors of civil war. Our once happy land resounds with the clangor of rebellious arms, and is polluted with the dead bodies of its children, some seeking to destroy, some struggling to maintain the common
All the fetid gall that drips From the land's infected lips, In the murky woof embroider Darkness, death, and hell's disorder. Weave we in the magic loom Piles of slain without a tomb, Cities lit with midnight fires, Crashing walls and toppling spires, Famine's sunken, ghastly cheek, Outraged woman's helpless shriek, Hoary age and infancy Plunged in one wide misery; In the murky woof embroider Darkness, death, and hell's disorder. Let the banner's folds be bound With a fiery serpent round; Eden's destroyer shall recal The new temptation, sin, and fall. We have changed the stripes of flame To the burning blush of shame, And the streaks of spotless white To the pallor of affright, And the stars which blazoned all To wormwood in its endless fall. The song of treason ceased — the demons fled, And as I mused in the dark bitterness Of grief to this sad prophecy of woe, I heard a sound, as when the ocean moves His moist battalions to the tempest's march, To storm the fortress of the rocky
d. Wave, banners, wave, and let the sky Glow with your flashing wings on high, There's music in each rustling fold Sweeter than minstrel ever told. Oh! who that ever heard the story Of all our dead who fell in glory, Still pressing where the starry light Streamed like a meteor o'er the fight, Till their expiring bosoms poured The red libation of the sword, Would leave Kentucky now, or thrust Her beaming forehead in the dust, Where treason's reptiles writhe and hiss Like fiends shut out from Eden's bliss? Better the freeman's lowliest grave Than golden fetters of a slave; Then with or on thy shining shield Return, Kentucky, from the field. If bribed by lust of power or gold, Thy country's welfare thou hast sold, Iscariot-like thy name shall be In Freedom's dark Gethsemane; Disgrace and fell remorse shall plough Eternal furrows o'er thy brow; By angels, men, and fiends abhorred-- Like Judas who betrayed his Lord. Outcast at home — across the sea, Shunned like a leper thou shalt be-- N
llars per day to our State and Federal Government. I, for one am tired of such a useless tax, and will now suggest a form of government which will rid the people of it and them. I propose that Virginia forthwith declare herself independent of the Federal Government, and then that every county in the State of Virginia declare itself independent of the State government — each county taking care of itself; every county will be taken care of. Justice being the law, and magistrates enforcing it, we shall have no need of learned ignoramuses to legislate for us. By throwing open our ports we should make friends of the world, and have no need of standing armies, nor Old Abe as President. Our postal affairs can be much better conducted by express companies, on the insurance principle. Respectfully submitted by L. L. Lee, Of Prince George County, Va. Eden, April 9, 1861. P. S.--Let him that is opposed to me challenge for debate; Those that take sides with me will promulgat
read out into several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial character, proved to be upon a thin crust, which was soon cut through by our long trains into the deep quicksand, requiring miles of corduroy. At several of the swamps, the enemy had attempted to obstruct our march by falling timber. The supplies continued good and the weather excellent. On the ninth, our direction of march was changed to the east, taking the road from Eden to Monteith Post-Office, on the Charleston Railroad. At the large Monteith Swamp, we found that the enemy, besides obstructing the road for nearly a mile by falling trees, had built two small earthworks, and with a single gun and about four hundred infantry was making a show of stopping our march. Jackson's division being in advance, he was ordered to throw out several regiments on each flank, while a brigade in the centre should make a feint, to engage attention and enable the pioneers to
read out into several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial character, proved to be upon a thin crust, which was soon cut through by our long trains into the deep quicksand, requiring miles of corduroy. At several of the swamps, the enemy had attempted to obstruct our march by falling timber. The supplies continued good and the weather excellent. On the ninth, our direction of march was changed to the east, taking the road from Eden to Monteith Post-Office, on the Charleston Railroad. At the large Monteith Swamp, we found that the enemy, besides obstructing the road for nearly a mile by falling trees, had built two small earthworks, and with a single gun and about four hundred infantry was making a show of stopping our march. Jackson's division being in advance, he was ordered to throw out several regiments on each flank, while a brigade in the centre should make a feint, to engage attention and enable the pioneers to
teen miles in same direction. December 7.--Marched to Springfield. December 8.--Camped near Eden. December 9.--Moved out to the Monteith road, reaching the Monteith Swamp about noon, where thSpringfield; crossed Turkey Branch Creek. December 8.--Marched twelve miles south-west to near Eden; passed through Springfield. December 9.--Marched three miles south to the Monteith road; the; marched twelve miles and camped for the night. 6th. Marched at nine A. M.; took dinner near Eden, went into camp for the night at Wall-hower Swamp. 10th. Received orders to report to ColonelDistance marched, fifteen miles. 8th. Moved at half-past 6 A. M., encamped for the night near Eden at half-past 3 P. M. Distance marched, fourteen miles. 9th. Marched at seven o'clock A. M., eeld. 8th. Moved at seven A. M., and crossed Ebenezer Creek, and bivouacked for the night near Eden. 9th. Moved at eight A. M., First division leading. At two P. M., the rebels opened with art
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee to the rear. (search)
Lee to the rear. by John R. Thompson. Dawn of a pleasant morning in May Broke through the Wilderness, cool and gray, While perched in the tallest tree-tops, the birds Were carrolling Mendelsshon's “Songs without words,” Far from the haunts of men remote, The brook brawled on with a liquid note, And Nature, all tranquil and lovely, wore The smile of the spring, as in Eden of yore. Little by little, as daylight increased, And deepened the roseate flush in the East; Little by little did morn reveal Two long, glittering lines of steel, Where two hundred thousand bayonets gleam, Tipped with the light of the earliest beam, And the faces are sullen and grim to see, In the hostile armies of Grant and Lee. All of a sudden, ere rose the sun, Pealed on the silence the opening gun-- A little white puff of smoke there came, And anon the valley was wreathed in flame. Down on the left of the Rebel lines, Where a breastwork stands in a copse of pines, Before the Rebels their ranks can form, The
1 2 3 4