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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 35 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 12 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
n Vine Creek, with combats at New Hope Church, Pickett's Mills, and other points. May 26-June 1, 1864.Combats at and about Dallas. May 27, 1864.Skirmish at Pond Springs, Ala. May 29, 1864.Action at Moulton, Ala. June 9, 1864.Skirmishes near Big Shanty and near Stilesborough. June 10, 1864.Skirmish at Calhoun. June 10-July 3, 1864.Operations about Marietta, with combats at Pine Hill, Lost Mountain, Brush Mountain, Gilgal Church, Noonday Creek, McAfee's Cross-Roads, Kenesaw Mountain, Powder Springs, Cheney's Farm, Kolb's Farm, Olley's Creek, Nickajack Creek, Noyes' Creek, and other points. June 24, 1864.Action at La Fayette. July 4, 1864.Skirmishes at Ruff's Mill, Neal Dow Station, and Rottenwood Creek. July 5-17, 1864.Operations on the line of the Chattahoochee River, with skirmishes at Howell's, Turner's, and Pace's Ferries, Isham's Ford, and other points. July 10-22, 1864.Rousseau's raid from Decatur, Ala., to the West Point and Montgomery Railroad, with skirmishes near Coo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
t nature of the ground passed over, camped at a point on Allatoona Ridge, about half way between Stilesborough and Burnt Hickory. McCook reached Burnt Hickory about 2 p. m., after skirmishing with the enemy about four miles. He captured a rebel courier, bearing a dispatch to the rebel General Jackson, commanding a division of cavalry, with instructions from General Johnston to observe our movements toward Burnt Hickory, and stating that Johnston was moving in the direction of Dallas and Powder Springs. General Garrard, commanding Second Cavalry Division, informed me that he was camped on Pumpkin Vine Creek, about three miles from Dallas, and that in moving on that place, and when within a quarter of a mile from it, he was attacked by what was reported by prisoners to be Bate's division, the advance of Hardee's corps. Garrard repulsed this force and drove it back toward Dallas. On the 25th the First Division of Cavalry (McCook's) moved on the road leading to Golgotha, preceding Bu
o operate against the railroad between the Chattahoochee and Marietta. That night the Army went into bivouac eight miles north of Pray's Church, after having effected an undisturbed and safe passage of the Chattahoochee. Information was here received that Kilpatrick's cavalry was north of the river, and that Girard's cavalry had moved in the direction of Rome. The next morning, I telegraphed to General Bragg as follows: (no. 33.] October 2d. To-night my right will be at Powder Springs, with my left on Lost Mountain. This will, I think, force Sherman to move on us or to move south. Should he move towards Augusta, all available troops should be sent there with an able officer of high rank to command. Could General Lee spare a division for that place in such an event? J. B. Hood, General. The night of the 2d, the Army rested near Flint Hill Church. On the morning of the 3d, Lieutenant General Stewart was instructed to move with his Corps, and take possession of
enn. Cleveland, Tenn. Ripley, Miss. Salisbury, Tenn. Bean's Station, Tenn. Morristown, Tenn. Mossy Creek, Tenn. Dandridge, Tenn. Fair Gardens, Tenn. Arkadelphia, Ark. Camden, Ark. Prairie D'ann, Ark. Jenkins' Ferry, Ark. Natchitoches, La. Wilson's Farm, La. Sabine Cross Roads, La. Cane River, La. Red Clay, Ga. Resaca, Ga. Varnell's Station, Ga. Tilton, Ga. Rome, Ga. Dallas, Ga. Kingston, Ga. Kenesaw, Ga. Decatur, Ga. Ackworth, Ga. McAffee's Cross Roads, Ga. Powder Springs, Ga. Noonday Creek, Ga. Lovejoy's Station, Ga. Newnan, Ga. Hillsboro, Ga. Fairburn, Ga. Red Oak, Ga. Jonesboro, Ga. Pulaski, Tenn. Cypress River, Ga. Brice's Cross Roads, Miss. Tupelo, Miss. Hurricane Creek, Miss.: Booneville, Mo. Little Blue, Mo. Independence, Mo. Big Blue, Mo. Osage River, Mo. Franklin, Tenn. Nashville, Tenn. Rutherford's Creek, Tenn. Pulaski, Tenn. Egypt Station, Miss. Mount Sterling, Ky. Saltville, Va. Sherman's March to the Sea. Griswoldville,
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
Resaca, May 13-15 (3,000); New Hope Church, May 25 (1,000); Pickett's Mills, May 27 (1,900); Dallas, May 28-31 (1,800); Adairsville, Cassville, Rome Cross Roads, etc.Atlanta Campaign, Ga Killed 4,423 Wounded 22,822 Missing 4,442   Total 31,687 1,458 7,436 405 9,299 June 1-30 Includes Dallas, June 1-4 (900); Pine Mountain, June 14-19 (1,100); Culp's House, June 22 (700); Kenesaw Mountain, June 20-30 (1,200); Assault on Kenesaw, June 27 (3,000); Lattimore's Mill; Powder Springs, etc.Atlanta Campaign, Ga 1,125 5,740 665 7,530 July 1-31 Includes Nickajack Creek, July 2-5 (450); Chattahoochie, July 6-10 (850); Peach Tree Creek, July 20 (2,200); Atlanta, July 21, 22 (4,200); Ezra Chapel, July 28 (850); and others.Atlanta Campaign, Ga 1,110 5,915 2,694 9,719 Aug. 1-31 Includes Utoy Creek, Aug. 5, 6 (800); and Siege of Atlanta.Atlanta Campaign, Ga 453 2,318 466 3,237 Sept. 1 Jonesboro and Lovejoy's Station.Atlanta Campaign, Ga 277 1,413 212 1,902
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 16: Atlanta campaign-battles about Kenesaw Mountain. June, 1864. (search)
out five miles southeast of where I was, but this was nothing unusual, for at the same moment there was firing along our lines full ten miles in extent. Early the next day (23d) I rode down to the Kulp house, which was on a road leading from Powder Springs to Marietta, about three miles distant from the latter. On the way I passed through General Butterfield's division of Hooker's corps, which I learned had not been engaged at all in the battle of the day before; then I rode along Geary's and m; and the same day General T. J. Wood's division took a hill, which the enemy assaulted three times at night without success, leaving more than a hundred dead on the ground. Yesterday the extreme right (Hooker and Schofield) advanced on the Powder Springs road to within three miles of Marietta. The enemy made a strong effort to drive them away, but failed signally, leaving more than two hundred dead on the field. Our lines are now in close contact, and the fighting is incessant, with a good
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 19 (search)
and was terribly angry at the cautious pursuit by Garrard's cavalry, and even by the head of our infantry columns. But Johnston had in advance cleared and multiplied his roads, whereas ours had to cross at right angles from the direction of Powder Springs toward Marietta, producing delay and confusion. By night Thomas's head of column ran up against a strong rear-guard intrenched at Smyrna camp-ground. six miles below Marietta, and there on the next day we celebrated our Fourth of July, by athening the several points for the proposed passage of the Chattahoochee, in increasing the number and capacity of the bridges, rearranging the garrisons to our rear, and in bringing forward supplies. On the 15th General Stoneman got back to Powder Springs, and was ordered to replace General Blair at Turner's Ferry, and Blair, with the Seventeenth Corps, was ordered up to Roswell to join McPherson. On the 17th we began the general movement against Atlanta, Thomas crossing the Chattahoochee a
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
ected signs of activity on the part of the enemy. On the 21st Hood shifted his army across from the Macon road, at Lovejoy's, to the West Point road, at Palmetto Station, and his cavalry appeared on the west side of the Chattahoochee, toward Powder Springs; thus, as it were, stepping aside, and opening wide the door for us to enter Central Georgia. I inferred, however, that his real purpose was to assume the offensive against our railroads, and on the 24th a heavy force of cavalry from Mississalmetto Station. I could not get spies to penetrate his camps, but on the 1st of October I was satisfied that the bulk of his infantry was at and across the Chattahoochee River, near Campbellton, and that his cavalry was on the west side, at Powder Springs. On that day I telegraphed to General Grant: Hood is evidently across the Chattahoochee, below Sweetwater. If he tries to get on our road, this side of the Etowah, I shall attack him; but if he goes to the Selma & Talladega road, why w
about Palmetto Station. He also threw a pontoon-bridge across the Chattahoochee, and sent cavalry detachments to the west, in the direction of Carrolton and Powder Springs. About the same time President Davis visited Macon and his army at Palmetto, and made harangues referring to an active campaign against us. Hood still remainbout the first of October, some of the enemy's cavalry made their appearance on the west of the Chattahoochee, and one of his infantry corps was reported near Powder Springs; and I received authentic intelligence that the rest of his infantry was crossing to the west of the Chattahoochee. I at once made my orders that Atlanta andrps encamped in the vicinity of Dallas. On the following day, the Seventeenth corps moved to Lost Mountain, while the Fifteenth proceeded in the direction of Powder Springs. The movement continued, and the whole command reached Smyrna camp-ground on the afternoon of the fifth, and went into position, facing westward, Seventeen
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 9: (search)
in the expected confusion of his crossing the Chattahoochee, a broad and deep river then to his rear. Ordering every part of the army to pursue vigorously on the morning of the 3d of July, I rode into Marietta, just quitted by the rebel rear guard, and was terribly angry at the cautious pursuit by Garrard's cavalry, and even by the head of our infantry columns. But Johnston had in advance cleared and multiplied his roads; whereas ours had to cross at right angles from the direction of Powder Springs toward Marietta, producing delay and confusion. By night Thomas' head of column ran up against a strong rear guard intrenched at Smyrna camp ground, six miles below Marietta, and there, on the next day, we celebrated our Fourth of July, by a noisy but not a desperate battle, designed chiefly to hold the enemy there till Generals McPherson and Schofield could get well into position below him, near the Chattahoochee crossings. It was here that General Noyes, late Governor of Ohio, lost h
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