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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 570 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 328 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 124 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 116 60 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 89 3 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 84 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 80 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 74 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 66 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Resaca (Georgia, United States) or search for Resaca (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
tack Johnston's position at Dalton in front, but marched from Chattanooga to feign at his front and to make a lodgment in Resaca, eighteen miles to his rear, on his line of communication and supply. The movement was partly, not wholly, successful; but it compelled Johnston to let go Dalton and fight us at Resaca, where, May 13th-16th, our loss was 2747 and his 2800. I fought offensively and he defensively, aided by earth parapets. He then fell back to Calhoun, Adairsville, and Cassville, wher on Allatoona, which was handsomely repulsed by Corse. Hood then moved westward, avoiding Rome, and by a circuit reached Resaca, which he summoned to surrender, but did not wait to attack. He continued thence the destruction of the railroad for about twenty miles to the tunnel, including Dalton, whose garrison he captured. I followed up to Resaca, then turned west to intercept his retreat down the Valley of Chattooga [see map, p. 249]; but by rapid marching he escaped to Gadsden, on the Coosa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
ough Snake Creek Gap to the railroad bridge at Resaca, a light intrenchment to cover 3000 or 4000 mertin's division to observe the Oostenaula from Resaca to Rome, and Kelly's little brigade to join thrk. Lieutenant-General Hood was dispatched to Resaca with three divisions immediately. The next moConfederate army moved from Dalton and reached Resaca just as the Federal troops approaching from Sn occupied the west face of the intrenchment of Resaca. Hardee's corps, also facing to the west, fored before being recalled. The occupation of Resaca being exceedingly hazardous, I determined to a supplies of intrenching tools. Two events at Resaca were greatly magnified to him. He says that to march by two good roads direct from Dalton to Resaca; and. the further fact that our post at ResacaResaca could hold out a longer time than our march to that point would require. Mr. Davis and General Sorks, not on ridges and ravines. In leaving Resaca I hoped to find a favorable position near Calh[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opening of the Atlanta campaign. (search)
263]: Cantey with his division arrived at Resaca that evening (7th), and was charged with the drk. Lieutenant-General Hood was dispatched to Resaca with three divisions immediately. It so haake Creek Gap was left wholly unprotected. At Resaca, where the railroad crosses the Oostenaula, CaMcPherson, marching through Snake Creek Gap to Resaca, should not only destroy but hold the only rai on our left flank and rear, McPherson holding Resaca, Thomas, with the corps of Howard and Palmer, ng the evacuation of Dalton and the retreat to Resaca, is undoubtedly true. That we could have heldng Part of the Confederate intrenchments at Resaca. From a photograph. them to be Georgians, or when McPherson drove us into the works before Resaca, which were defended only by Cantey's brigade r night. One serious attack by McPherson, and Resaca must have been captured. Fortunately McPherate column moving on him. The intrenchments at Resaca were formidable, and when McPherson felt the l
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
came from Mobile about the 7th of May and was stationed at Resaca. Loring's division, three infantry brigades and two battety and a detachment of 550 from French's division, reached Resaca May 10th, 11th, and 12th. Meantime a regiment of the Geor six hundred strong, had been added to Hood's corps. At Resaca General Johnston had at least 67,000 men for battle and 1. at most 104,000: For the strength of Sherman's army at Resaca, add 5200 for cavalry joined between May 1st and 12th to h On the night of May 16th the Confederate army evacuated Resaca. On the following day, at Adairsville, it was reinforced h 4174 effectives, exclusive of the detachment that was at Resaca. Another Georgia State line regiment, estimated as 600, wserts that the only affair worth mentioning on his left at Resaca was near the night of May 14th, when forty or fifty skirmircy. The Fifteenth Corps lost 628 killed and wounded at Resaca. The troops in its front, Loring's and Cantey's divisions
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
Transferred to Fourth Division, Twentieth Corps, July 25th and August 9th, respectively. Col. William W. Berry; 6th Ky., Transferred to Fourth Division, Twentieth Corps, July 25th and August 9th, respectively. Maj. Richard T. Whitaker, Capt. Isaac N. Johnston; 23d Ky., Transferred to Second Brigade, First Division, August 19th. Lieut.-Col. James C. Foy, Maj. George W. Northup; 1st Ohio, Ordered to Chattanooga July 25th. Maj. Joab A. Stafford; 6th Ohio, At Cleveland, Kingston, and Resaca; relieved for muster out June 6th. Col. Nicholas L. Anderson; 41st Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Robert L. Kimberly; 71st Ohio, Joined August 31st. Col. Henry K. McConnell; 93d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Daniel Bowman; 124th Ohio, Col. Oliver H. Payne, Lieut.-Col. James Pickands, Col. Oliver H. Payne. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel Beatty, Col. Frederick Knefier: 79th Ind., Col. Frederick Knefier, Lieut.-Col. Samuel P. Oyler, Maj. George W. Parker, Capt. John G. Dunbar, Capt. Eli F. Ritter; 86th Ind., Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
the Atlanta railroad at least ten miles below Resaca. McPherson, failing in getting some of his trt Marietta, who had come out from the woods at Resaca and formed their line behind a rail fence. Afup the chase until it ran against the works at Resaca. followed closely by Dodge's Sixteenth Corps, on Confederate cavalry, which had run out from Resaca to watch this doorway. Our cavalry followed uAs soon as Johnston reached the little town of Resaca he formed a horseshoe-shaped line, something l commander but to withdraw his whole army from Resaca. This was effected during the night of the 15nfederate prisoners, word was telegraphed from Resaca that bacon, hard-bread, and coffee were alreadhnston. Polk, with Loring's division, reached Resaca May 11th. June 14th, Polk having been killed, rthward march, Hood avoided Rome and aimed for Resaca. Schofield was warned, and got ready to defenthat of the resolute Colonel Clark R. Wever at Resaca, Hood had partly invested Resaca, and on th[12 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
ntended Wheeler should operate, in the first instance, south of Chattanooga. I was hopeful that this combined movement would compel Sherman to retreat for want of supplies, and thus allow me an opportunity to fall upon his rear with our main body. In accordance with my determination to attempt, with cavalry, the destruction of Sherman's road, I ordered General Wheeler, with 4500 men, to begin operations at once. He succeeded in burning the bridge over the Etowah; recaptured Dalton and Resaca; destroyed about 35 miles of railroad in the vicinity, and captured about 300 mules and 1000 horses; he destroyed in addition about 50 miles of railroad in Tennessee. General Forrest, with his usual energy, struck shortly afterward the Federal line of supplies in this State, and inflicted great damage upon the enemy. Forrest and Wheeler accomplished all but the impossible with their restricted numbers, and the former, finally, was driven out of Tennessee by superior forces. So vast were
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
er road. He should lose no time in moving. On the 11th the army crossed the Coosa River, marched in the direction of Resaca and Dalton, and bivouacked that night fourteen miles above Coosaville and ten miles north-west of Rome. That same day Ms advance from Rome. Having thus relieved the army of all incumbance, and made ready for battle, we marched rapidly to Resaca, and thence to Dalton, via Sugar Valley Post-Office. Lieutenant-General Lee moved upon Resaca, with instructions to displResaca, with instructions to display his forces and demand the surrender of the garrison, but not to attack unless, in his judgment, the capture could be effected with small loss of life. He decided not to assault the Federal works, and commenced at once the destruction of the railr was refused, but was finally acceded to at 4 P. M. The garrison consisted of about one thousand men. As the road between Resaca and Tunnel Hill had been effectually destroyed, the army was put in motion the next morning in the direction of Gadsden,