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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 45 45 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 10 10 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 6 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Rome, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Rome, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
rst Michigan Engineers and Mechanics ordered to the front. This regiment, or rather eight companies of it, arrived at Atlanta about the last of September. Two more companies subsequently joined, but the remaining two companies did not reach the regiment for some months. The major-general commanding having directed that the new line of fortifications be proceeded with, the entire engineer force was set at work to construct the profiles and revetments. General Corse, then commanding at Rome, Ga., on the 29th of September, made an urgent requisition for an engineer officer to examine and improve the defenses of that town. Lieut. William Ludlow, Corps of Engineers, was sent. The first infantry details for work on the fortifications were called for on the 3d of October, and numbered 2,000 men. On the 5th of October I telegraphed to General Sherman, then at Big Shanty, as follows: The new line of works is in a defensible condition from the redoubt where the photographs were t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
15, occupying the same position as yesterday; severe fighting this afternoon to the right and left of us, though nothing serious in our immediate front; casualties are, Private William C. Green (Company B) killed and Corpl. John W. Bartlett, Privates — Walker (Company I), and George Schmith (Company E) wounded. May 16, on its being ascertained that the enemy had left our front, the regiment proceeded back to where the knapsacks had been left, and at 8 a. m. was moving in the direction of Rome, Ga.; bivouacked for the night at 9 p. m., having marched about twenty miles. May 17, moved forward at daylight, marching rapidly; our advance encountered the enemy one mile north of the Oostenaula River, and a lively fight ensued, both forces using artillery; the Sixteenth was deployed as skirmishers on the right of the road; the enemy fell back to the river; no casualties reported. May 18, at 3 a. m. our lines were advanced; the enemy retreated to the south side of the river, burning the br
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 133 (search)
ng them to the top of the mountain; my men being greatly exposed to the enemy's fire, our loss was heavy, having lost 30 men killed and wounded, including 1 commissioned officer. May 12, made a flank movement to the right, passing through Snake [Creek] Gap at dark. During the engagement at Resaca my regiment was held in reserve. May 15, took up position on the left of the Fifteenth Corps in the front line. May 16, the enemy having evacuated, we took up line of march in the direction of Rome, Ga. May 18, reached Rome. May 24, moved from Rome in the direction of Van Wert, marching eighteen miles, and encamped for the night at [Peak's] Spring. May 26, moved to Dallas, Ga., passing through the town and camping on the hills beyond, where we tound the enemy strongly intrenched. May 30, 1 commissoned officer wounded while on the skirmish line. June 1, abandoned our works and moved to the left. Nothing of importance transpired until the 19th. June 19, my regiment advanced as skirmish
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 134 (search)
eached Resaca, Ga., on the 16th day of May, 1864, after having marched steadily for twenty days previous, and joined the First Brigade, Second Di vision, Fourteenth Army Corps, in the earlypart of the day, just as our division was starting for Rome, Ga., and, although the regiment had already marched five miles with heavy knapsacks, they kept pace readily with the column, which moved rapidly through Snake Creek Gap and toward Rome, a distance of fifteen miles, making twenty miles for the Tenth Michigan. Halted at 9 p.m. May 17, left camp at 6.30 a. m. and marched toward Rome, Ga. During the engagement which occurred near Rome, when the head of the column struck the rebel army defending the town, we were held in reserve, as our brigade was in rear of the column in the order of march. At 8.30 p. m. moved to the right and front one and a half miles, and bivouacked until morning. May 18, moved out just after daybreak in a dense fog, which rendered it impossible to see but a few rods,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 139 (search)
rists. The balance of the regiment gained the knob mentioned, from where they were able to do serious damage to the rebels, remaining in that position until night, firing every cartridge from a position where every shot might be made fatal. A little after dark we rejoined the brigade, having lost 3 commissioned officers wounded, 1 (Capt. John A. Parrott) mortally; 6 enlisted men killed and 21 wounded; aggregate, 31 killed and wounded. May 16, our division took up the line of march toward Rome, Ga., going into camp about twelve miles from that place. My regiment having the advance, the next day Company A was sent forward as advance guard, meeting the vedettes of the enemy six miles north of Rome. From this point this company, under Capt. Peter Ege, skirmished constantly with the enemy, being supported by Company F, under Lieutenant Slaughter, and driving the rebels within their works at Rome. Here Company F was deployed, taking position on the left of Company A, Captain Ege assum
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 143 (search)
y on the morning of the 18th Captain Clason, of Company B, who was in charge of the brigade picket-line, notified me that the enemy had left and that he was occupying the enemy's works with the skirmishers of the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio. I sent the information to Colonel Mitchell, commanding the brigade, who sent me an order during the day, hereunto attached, and markedA, Not found. complimenting the regiment and Captain Clason for being first inside the enemy's breast-works at Rome, Ga. The enemy, consisting of General French's division of infantry and a brigade of Texas cavalry, retreated across the Etowah and Oostenaula, burning the bridges over both streams. In addition to 6 pieces of artillery captured here, we also secured a large amount of tobacco and cotton and extensive machine-shops for the manufacture of heavy ordnance. The One hundred and twenty-first rested on the north side of the river, where they were supplied with shoes and clothing and enabled to get p
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 148 (search)
ch was long and tedious, but was borne by all cheerfully and without complaint. At Resaca we met the enemy and were engaged actively with him. The regiment occupied a temporary line of works immediately in front of and but a few hundred yards from the works of the opposing forces. Here, as in previous instances, every man did his duty, until the flight of the enemy from Resaca, on the night of the 14th [15th] of May, opened on the following morning a new field of labor. An expedition to Rome, Ga., was fitted out for our division, and on the morning of the 15th [16th] the regiment was detailed, with one section of Battery I, Second Illinois Artillery, to command and guard the division supply and ordnance train, in rear of the marching column of the division, to that city. The regiment took no part in the fight at Rome on the 17th; arrived with its important charge on the following day. Remained at Rome doing various duty until the 24th day of May, when the entire division took up
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 177 (search)
harness off for the first time in thirty-six hours. 11th, placed three pieces in the gap on the railroad and fired forty rounds. 12th, marched at 6 a. m. for Snake [Creek] Gap, arriving in camp at 2 a. m. on the 13th. 13th, formed line of battle in front of Resaca, Ga. 15th, went into position and kept up a steady fire all day; at night the enemy opened with musketry in our front, when, supposing they were advancing, I fired a few rounds; in half an hour all was quiet. 16th, marched for Rome, Ga., under General Davis. 17th, arrived at 5 p. m. within two miles of Rome, where we had a sharp fight, and drove the enemy across the river into the town. 18th, in position to shell the city, when a rebel battery opened on us; returned their fire and silenced them. At noon our division had the town. 21st, moved into Rome. 24th and 25th, marched in a southeasterly direction twenty-five miles. 26th, arrived at Dallas, Ga., at 5 p. m. 27th to 31st, in position fronting west. June 1, moved
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 181 (search)
illery, Fourteenth Army Corps, took a position 500 yards from, and partially enfilading, the enemy's main works; fired-rapidly until night-fall, when it withdrew and replenished with ammunition. On the 15th relieved Battery I, First Ohio Artillery, one-half mile to the right of our former position, and kept up a slow fire on the enemy's works during the day. Marched with the Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, May 16 and 17 until 4 p. m., when it engaged the enemy with the division at Rome, Ga., where it remained until the 24th of May, when it took up the line of march toward Dallas, Ga., arriving on the 27th, and was in position in different sections of the lines for the most part, yet firing but a few rounds, until the enemy evacuated, June 5, 1864. After resting until the 10th of June the battery moved with the division and took up a position. June 15, in line in front of the enemy's first line at Kenesaw Mountain, where it remained until the 19th, when the enemy fell back t