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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nez Perce Indians, (search)
government. On May 21 General Howard reported that he had had a conference with Joseph and other chiefs on May 19, and that they yielded a constrained compliance with the orders of the government, and had been allowed thirty days to gather in their people, stock, etc. On June 14 the Indians under Joseph from Wallowa, White Bird from Salmon River, and Looking-glass from Clearwater, assembled near Cottonwood Creek, in apparent compliance with their promise, when General Howard, who was at Fort Lapwai, heard that four white men had been murdered on John Day's Creek by some Nez Perces, and that White Bird had announced that he would not go on the reservation. Other murders were reported. General Howard despatched two cavalry companies, with ninety-nine men, under Captain Perry, to the scene, who found the Indian camp at White Bird Cañon, and on June 17 made an unsuccessful attack, with the loss of one lieutenant and thirty-three men. General Howard then took the field in person with 4
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, (search)
starts from Boston overland for Oregon, and with a remnant of his party descends the Columbia, arriving at Fort Vancouver......Oct. 29, 1832 Fort Nisqually built by Archibald McDonald 4 or 5 miles from the mouth of the Nisqually River.......1833 Mission station established at Waiilatpu, near Walla Walla, by the Revs. Whitman, Spaulding, and Gray......1836 Lieut. R. E. Johnson, of the United States exploring expedition, with three men from Nisqually, visits Forts Okanagan, Colville, Lapwai, and Walla Walla, and returns by Yakima River......May–July, 1841 Michael T. Simmons, with five families, settles at Tumwater, at the head of Budd Inlet, naming it New Market......October, 1845 Congress notifies Great Britain that the conventions of 1818 and 1827, for joint occupation of Oregon Territory (including Washington) will terminate after twelve months......Feb. 9, 1846 Smithfield, afterwards (1850) Olympia, founded by Levi L. Smith and Edmund Sylvester......1846 Indian
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Oregon Volunteers. (search)
gainst Snake Indians in Idaho August 19-October 11, 1862, and protect emigrant roads till November 1, 1862. At Fort Walla Walla till April, 1863. Moved to Fort Lapwai June 13, 1863; thence to Canyon City July 10. Ordered to Fort Vancouver September 29, 1863, and duty there till April, 1864. Expedition to Southeastern OrCity to Fort Dalles; thence to Fort Walla Walla June 24-July 12, 1862. Duty near Lewiston, Nez Perce Reservation, July 25 to November 1, 1862. Garrison at Fort Lapwai till May, 1865. Expedition from Fort Lapwai to the Meadows August 22 to September 20, 1863. At Fort Walla Walla and other points in District of Oregon MayFort Lapwai to the Meadows August 22 to September 20, 1863. At Fort Walla Walla and other points in District of Oregon May, 1865, to muster out. Companies G, H, I, K, L and M authorized January, 1863. Companies G and H at Camp Watson on Rock Creek, Ore.; Company I at Fort Klamath, Company K at Fort Dalles and Companies L and M at Fort Boies. Expedition from Camp Lincoln, near Canyon City, to Harney Lake Valley March 24-April 16, 1864 (Detachm
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 63: in the Northwest, among the Indians; trip to Alaska; life in Portland, Ore.; 1874 to 1881 (search)
lass in his Sunday school, and bore my part in his social and religious meetings. As much of my duty had to do with the various tribes of Indians, I spent much time in going from one post to another of my extensive territory. The three Indian wars with the Nez Perces, the Piutes and Bannocks, and the so-called Sheep Eaters took three summers and much planning during my command of the Department of the Columbia. In the Nez Perces campaign I gathered all available military force near Fort Lapwai, Idaho, and after the most arduous campaign, with several battles. and a continuous march of over 1,400 miles across the Rocky Mountains, making our way through the forests of the Yellowstone National Park, I succeeded in detraining the Indians till General Nelson A. Miles overtook and had a battle with them near Bearpaw Mountain. The firing was still going on when I arrived on the field, and through my own interpreters succeeded in persuading Chief Joseph to abandon further hostile ef
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
46, F11 Lake Natchez, La. 156, D6 Lakeport, La. 135-A Lake Providence, La. 117, 1; 135-A; 155, A6, 135-A; 155, B6; 171 Lake Saint Joseph, La. 155, D6 Lake Spring, Mo. 152, H6 Lake Village, Ark. 154, G6 Lamar, Miss. 135-A; 154, B12 Lamar, Mo. 135-A; 160, A11 Lamar, Tex. 43, 8; 54, 1; 65, 10 Lancaster, Ky. 9, 2; 118, 1; 135-A; 141, F1; 150, B11; 151, H12 Fort Lancaster, Tex. 54, 1 Lane's Prairie, Mo. 152, F6 Fort Lapwai, Idaho Ter. 134, 1 Laredo, Tex. 54, 1; 171 Larkinsville, Ala. 24, 3; 61, 9; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, E8 Fort Larned, Kans. 119, 1 Lauderdale Spring, Miss. 135-A Laurel Creek, W. Va. 9, 3; 140, G10; 141, C11, 141, D11 Laurel Fork, Cheat River, W. Va. 2, 4; 84, 10; 100, 1; 116, 3 Laurel Fork, Guyandotte River, W. Va. 141, E9 Laurel Hill, Va. 17, 1; 19, 1; 74, 1; 94, 2; 100, 1; 137, G6 Laurel Hill, W. Va. 84, 10; 116, 3; 135-A; 13